History (HIS)

Courses

HIS 106. Peoples of the Past. 3 Hours.

This course combines historic and archaeological approaches to explore major social, political and cultural transformations in several different world regions, with particular attention to the rise of agriculture, cities, states, and writing systems. No prerequisites. Course Information: Same as SOA 106. This course fulfills a general education requirement at UIS in the area of Comparative Societies Social Sciences.

HIS 107. Globalization and Power. 3 Hours.

The history of world cultures with a focus on marginalized groups on the periphery of civilization. The course is broken into four units: (1) The Inuit, (2) The Faroe Islands, (3) South Africa, and (4) Uncontacted Tribes. Course Information: Same as LIS 107. This course fulfills a general education requirement at UIS in the areas of Comparative Societies Social Sciences.

HIS 118. Making of the West. 3 Hours.

This interdisciplinary course will offer students the opportunity to become familiar with an array of Near Eastern cultures and societies, beliefs, and traditions, mainly by examining the archaeological evidence and reading ancient literary sources. It will be taught linking Greece and the Near East together. Course Information: This course fulfills a general education requirement at UIS in the areas of Comparative Societies Social Sciences.

HIS 119. Gods & Heroes of Early Europe. 3 Hours.

This interdisciplinary course will offer students the opportunity to become familiar with an array of European cultures and societies, beliefs, and traditions, mainly by examining the archaeological evidence and reading ancient literary sources. It will be taught as a course linking Greece to Western Europe. Course Information: This course fulfills a general education requirement at UIS in the areas of Comparative Societies Social Sciences (IAI Code: S1 901N).

HIS 121. The Historical Jesus. 3 Hours.

This course examines the portraits of Jesus in history. The class will focus on Jesus in the New Testament and non-canonical gospels, the history of Jesus in culture, and recent scholarly searches for the historical Jesus. Course Information: This course fulfills a general education requirement at UIS in the area of Freshman Seminar or a general education requirement at UIS in the areas of Humanities.

HIS 122. Game of Thrones. 3 Hours.

This course examines the cultural manifestations of Game of Thrones through the lens of history and philosophy. It will teach students how to employ historical and philosophical approaches using Game of Thrones as a vehicle for critical study.

HIS 123. Animals in Antiquity. 3 Hours.

The bond between humans and animals, domesticated for labor, consumption, or companionship, has been ancient and complex. This arguably co-dependent relationship has reflected what is good, but also dark and capricious in humans and is indicative of human fascination with their lives, feelings, and drives. This course will examine the cultural history and sociology of animals in Greco-Roman antiquity, drawing from a variety of primary sources, including literature, inscriptions, archaeology, and folklore. Course Information: This course fulfills a general education requirement at UIS in the area of Humanities and a general education requirement at UIS in the area of Freshman Seminar.

HIS 124. Antiquity in Film. 3 Hours.

Antiquity is a beloved and enduring theme in popular entertainment. Modern screenwriters follow Aristotle's rules for building a successful story, explore ancient myths, historical events, and ideas, transforming them into new vehicles of meaning. This course will explore the changing cultural and historical contexts, as well as the social forces behind movies we will watch and the stories that have inspired them over the centuries, as these seek to evoke emotional and intellectual responses among students. Course Information: This course fulfills a general education requirement at UIS in the area of Humanities and a general education requirement at UIS in the area of Freshman Seminar.

HIS 150. Topics in Comparative Religion. 3 Hours.

Introduction to the comparative study of religion. Course Information: This course fulfills a general education requirement at UIS in the area of Comparative Societies Humanities.

HIS 160. Topics in Middle Eastern History. 3 Hours.

Introduction to Middle Eastern history through a comparative perspective. This course takes a cross-disciplinary approach, designed to allow students the chance to examine the region from a number of different perspectives; not only a historical one but also those of literature, art, religion, economics, politics and international relations. Course Information: This course fulfills a general education requirement at UIS in the area of Comparative Societies Humanities.

HIS 161. Introduction to the Modern Middle East. 3 Hours.

This course introduces students to the history of the Middle East, Surveying major social, economic, and political developments, with a focus on the modern (20th century) period. Course Information: This course fulfills a general education requirement at UIS in the area of Comparative Societies Humanities.

HIS 176. History of Premodern East Asia. 3 Hours.

This course provides an introduction to the histories and societies of East Asia (primarily China, Japan, and Korea) from prehistoric times through the early-modern era (ca 1700). Themes include intercultural exchange, political and economic transformations, Confucianism, the relationships between Buddhism and indigenous religions and worldviews, gender relations, and warfare. Course Information: This course fulfills a general education requirement at UIS in the area of Comparative Societies Humanities.

HIS 177. History of Modern East Asia. 3 Hours.

This course uses a comparative, regional perspective to explore the histories of East Asia (primarily China, Japan, and Korea) from the early-modern era (ca 1700) to the present. Topics under examination include modern political, cultural, religious, and economic transformations, western and Asian colonialisms, changing world views and ideologies, and the historical evolution of gender roles. Course Information: This course fulfills a general education requirement at UIS in the area of Comparative Social Sciences Humanities.

HIS 201. World History. 3 Hours.

A broad survey of historical forces at work over the past 12,000 years, examining the manners in which human societies have organized themselves along categories of race, ethnicity, class, and gender to meet the challenges of the increasing human population and its demands on natural resources.

HIS 202. European History. 3 Hours.

Picking up with the year 1348, this survey examines the development of modern Europe. Topics include the aftereffects of the Crusades, the rise of market capitalism, the Black Death, the division of Christianity, the formation of nation-states, industrialization, and the spread of European influence across the world. Course Information: This course fulfills a general education requirement at UIS in the area of Humanities (IAI Code: H2 901).

HIS 204. U.S. History to 1877. 3 Hours.

An overview of U.S. political, social, economic, cultural, and foreign relations history from the colonial era through Reconstruction. Course Information: Fulfills a lower-division prerequisite for HIS majors/minors and a general education requirement at UIS in the area of Humanities or Social and Behavioral Science.

HIS 205. U.S. History Since 1877. 3 Hours.

An overview of U.S. political, social, economic, cultural, and foreign relations history from the Gilded Age to the present. Course Information: Fulfills a lower-division prerequisite for HIS majors/minors and a general education requirement at UIS in the area of Humanities or Social and Behavioral Science.

HIS 211. Women in the Middle East. 3 Hours.

Students will consider the ways in which social, religious, and cultural factors shape the lives of women in the Middle East over time - 7th century to present. course Information: This course fulfills a general education requirement at UIS in the area of Social and Behavioral Sciences.

HIS 212. History of Russia: Peter I to Putin. 3 Hours.

This survey course covers the history of modern Russia from the founding of the Empire under Peter I to the present day. It will examine major political, diplomatic, and cultural developments in Russia from the eighteenth to the twenty-first centuries in a broader global context, especially in comparison with other European countries. Course Information: This course fulfills a general education requirement at UIS in the area of Humanities or Social and Behavioral Sciences.

HIS 241. Survey of African American History. 3 Hours.

This course provides students with an introduction to African American history that covers ancient African cultures, the development of the transatlantic slave trade, the role of slavery as an economic system in the founding and development of the nation, and ends with the Civil War and Reconstruction. Course Information: Same as AAS 241. This course fulfills an Engaged Citizenship Common Experience requirement at UIS in the area of U.S. Communities.

HIS 242. ECCE: Srvy/Africn Amer Hist II. 3 Hours.

This course has been designed to acquaint the student with the major issues and trends related to understanding the historical experiences of African American people in this country. A variety of source materials, including historical documents, oral histories, literary texts, and cultural artifacts such as motion pictures, photographs, television programs, documentaries, and the visual arts will be used to help the student to analyze important themes of African American experience from the end of Reconstruction through the beginning of the millennium. Course Information: Same as AAS 242. This course fulfills an Engaged Citizenship Common Experience requirement at UIS in the area of U.S. Communities.

HIS 299. Tutorial. 1-4 Hours.

Intended to supplement, not supplant, regular course offerings. Students interested in a tutorial must secure the consent of the faculty member concerned before registration and submit any required documentation to him or her. Course Information: Not intended for use in meeting general education requirements.

HIS 301. The Historian's Craft. 3 Hours.

An introduction to the work of historians and the basic methods of the discipline. Should be completed before student reaches senior status. Course Information: Successful completion - C or higher - satisfies the department's requirement for the major or minor.

HIS 303. Understanding U.S. History. 3 Hours.

Conceptual approach to the U.S. past, developing themes of race (ethnicity), class, and gender. Emphasizes use of primary sources.

HIS 305. Monuments, Museums, and Memory: Springfield and Beyond. 4 Hours.

HIS 305 focuses on historical memory and cultural heritage in contemporary settings. As an introduction to public history, the course outlines theoretical and methodological approaches to working with people outside academia. Springfield serves as a laboratory, with site visits, in-class visits from local professionals, and assistance with UIS ?History Harvest? ? an event where community members bring historical objects and memories to be interpreted and recorded by curators and students.

HIS 325. ECCE: Latina/o USA. 4 Hours.

Introduction to the study of Mexican, Puerto Rican, Cuban, Dominican, and Central/South American communities in the U.S. Main themes are immigration, identity, gender and racial constructions, labor, education, and activism. Other topics include demographic trends, political participation, and relations with origin communities in Latin America and the Caribbean. Course Information: Same as GBL 325, LIS 325, PSC 465, and SOA 325. This course fulfills an Engaged Citizenship Common Experience requirement at UIS in the area of U.S. Communities. 420188.

HIS 341. Popular Culture in United States History: From Barnum to Beyonce. 4 Hours.

This course surveys the development and influence of popular culture in the United States, from the early 1800s to near the present day. Special attention is paid to the manner in which popular culture is formed by social, political, and economic conditions, as well as the ways that popular culture influences those conditions. The primary focus is on the construction and consumption of music and the dramatic forms of theatre, film, and television.

HIS 345. ECCE: US Women's History. 3 Hours.

Explores the history of U.S. women beginning with Native Americans. Examines themes of women in colonial society, domesticity, suffrage, reproduction, and work. Course Information: Same as WGS 345. This course fulfills an Engaged Citizenship Common Experience requirement at UIS in the area of ECCE U. S. Communities.

HIS 347. ECCE: Native American History. 4 Hours.

This course will cover Native American history, from before the arrival of Europeans in North America to the present day. Students will learn the concept of 'ethno history'. The course will cover Native American beliefs and cultures, and will explore the history of events such as the settlement of Cahokia, King Philip's War, the Pueblo Revolt, Pontiac's Rebellion, and the Trail of Tears. Course Information: This course fulfills an Engaged Citizenship Common Experience requirement at UIS in the area of U.S. Communities.

HIS 348. ECCE: Slavery and Abolition in the Nineteenth-Century United States. 4 Hours.

This course focuses on the histories of slavery and abolition in the nineteenth-century United States. In our class, we will consider how different groups of Americans worked to uphold and undermine their nation's "peculiar institution" of slavery. We will examine a diverse assortment of primary sources from enslaved people, antislavery activists, and slave owners as well as secondary scholarship about the institution of slavery and the evolution of abolitionism.

HIS 352. History of American Law. 3 Hours.

Historical examination of the professional and constitutional development of law in the United States. Topics include the common-law legacy, substantive and procedural aspects of legal history, jurisprudence, the American lawyer, and the interaction of law with American society, thought, and politics. Course Information: Same as LES 352.

HIS 360. Topics in Warfare. 3 Hours.

Much of history is military history. This course treats wars, warriors, and their impact on their contemporary societies. It also examines military practices and encounters with the other and discusses technical aspects of warfare like strategy, logistics, and armor.

HIS 365. ECCE: Culture Wars/Europe. 4 Hours.

This course examines the roots and manifestations of sacred-secular conflict in nineteenth and twentieth-century Europe. Topics include: popular religious piety, the spread of liberalism, the expansion of civil rights, the crisis of the papacy, the First Vatican Council, the secularization of education, movements to disestablish state churches, Euro-orientalism, and contemporary sacred secular conflicts such as Europe's Muslim communities and European Union identity. Course Information: This course fulfills an Engaged Citizenship Common Experience requirement at UIS in the area of Global Awareness.

HIS 371. Islamic Civilization. 4 Hours.

Introduction to pre-modern and modern Islamic history. The course examines the development of Muslim peoples and cultures from the seventh century through the nineteenth century. Themes include the study of Islamic origins and early Islam, methods of ancient and modern historians, politics, women, and other topics.

HIS 373. ECCE: Reading Arab Pasts. 4 Hours.

The disciplines of history and literature have long been closely combined. Writing history necessitates the crafting of a narrative; likewise, literature can serve as a primary source through which we gain insights into history and culture, In this course, we will look at literary works originating from the Middle East in order to gain a deeper understanding of the culture and policies of the countries under study. Countries under consideration may vary from semester to semester. Course Information: Same as ENG 325.

HIS 375. ECCE: Conflict in the Middle East. 4 Hours.

The various conflicts that have wracked the Middle East over the last two centuries are examined. The specifics of each conflict are considered, as well as the larger factors that have helped lay the groundwork for them. Among the latter are the historical relationships between the Middle East and the "West," which in many respects had been characterized by the latter's political and economic domination of the former. Course Information: This course fulfills an Engaged Citizenship Common Experience requirement at UIS in the area of Global Awareness.

HIS 378. ECCE: Christian-Muslim Encounters. 4 Hours.

Seminar on the global history of Christian-Muslim relations from the seventh century through the twenty-first century. This course surveys first contacts, Christians living under Muslim rule, significant intellectual figures and their theological writings, Crusade and Jihad, recent global encounters and dialogue in the religious and public spheres. Course Information: This course fulfills an Engaged Citizenship Common Experience requirement at UIS in the area of Global Awareness.

HIS 399. Tutorial. 1-8 Hours.

Intended to supplement, not supplant, regular course offerings. Students interested in a tutorial must secure the consent of the faculty member concerned before registration and submit any required documentation to him or her.

HIS 401. Senior Seminar. 3 Hours.

Capstone course for majors that focus upon refining and assessing skills in the discipline. Will examine current issues in the study of history. Course Information: Students should have senior status before enrolling and must have completed HIS 301 with a grade of C or higher.

HIS 402. Honors Research Seminar. 4 Hours.

Required for students in the History Honors Course of Study. Not to be taken earlier than the student's second-to-last semester. Students complete an honors portfolio and a major primary-source-based research project. Course Information: Prerequisite: Admission into History Honors Course of Study.

HIS 411. ECCE: Democracy and Democratic Theory. 4 Hours.

This course focuses on the evolution of Western Democratic theory from the ancient Greeks to our times, emphasizing institutions and traditions associated with evolving theories. Course Information: Same as PSC 425. This course fulfills an Engaged Citizenship Common Experience requirement at UIS in the area of Global Awareness.

HIS 412. Alexander the Great. 4 Hours.

This interdisciplinary course examines Alexander the Great's life, career, and legacy through primary and secondary sources. It places him in his historical context and discusses the political, religious, socio-economic, and cultural changes that transformed the Mediterranean world during his reign and beyond.

HIS 414. ECCE: Cleopatra's Egypt. 4 Hours.

This course will explore Cleopatra's reign, multi-cultural society, politics, representatives, and the ever-changing meanings with which she was invested from her lifetime through our days. Images and texts manipulated and shaped historical knowledge. Subsequent generations assigned different signifiers to the culturally charged icon of Cleopatra as a woman in power. Course Information: This course fulfills an Engaged Citizenship Common Experience requirement at UIS in the area of Global Awareness.

HIS 416. Rise of Rome. 4 Hours.

This interdisciplinary course offers an overview of Roman history from the founding of Rome (8th century BCE) to the collapse of the Roman Republic (30 BCE). We will survey how a city-state conquered the Italian peninsula, historical circumstances defined its role as a major political player, and Rome swallowed up the Hellenistic world.

HIS 417. Caesar to Charlemagne. 4 Hours.

Seminar on the decline and fall of the Roman Empire through the rise of Europe, the Byzantine Empire, and the Arab conquests. The course explores the transformation of the religions, political, social, and cultural identities in Europe, the Mediterranean, and the Near East from the second through the ninth centuries.

HIS 419. Egyptology. 4 Hours.

This course will provide an overview of the history, art, and archaeology of Pharaonic Egypt (i.e. Bronze Age Egypt under the pharaohs and before the Persian conquest and Alexander the Great). We will look at Egyptian monuments, including the pyramids, towns, mummies, religion, art, and literary texts. Course Information: Same as ART 419.

HIS 422. ECCE: Politics and Religion: Culture Wars. 4 Hours.

This ECCE course seeks to examine the multifaceted connections between politics and religion in the United States, although with a global perspective. Our goal will be to establish a dialogue on the issues that increasingly confront us about the proper role of religion in our public life. Course Information: Same as: LES 422 and PSC 422. This course fulfills an Engaged Citizenship Common Experience requirement at UIS in the area of U.S. Communities.

HIS 424. ECCE: Ancient Sport and Spectacle. 4 Hours.

This course will study the beginnings of sport in the Greco-Roman world and its transformation throughout the centuries to our days It will also examine how sport became a vehicle for the ideological and political expression, was associated with class, gender, violence, nationalism, and ethnicity, and how it has been appropriated and reinterpreted in modern times. Course Information: Same as LIS 424. This course fulfills an Engaged Citizenship Common Experience requirement at UIS in the area of Global Awareness.

HIS 427. African-American History. 4 Hours.

Focuses on the history and sojourn of the African-American from the creation and demise of the last three West African empires, through the enslavement and shipment of Africans to North America and their struggle for human and civil rights in present-day America. Topics are the Middle Passage, religion of the slaves, slave resistance, Abolitionism, the Civil War, Reconstruction, the Great Migration, Harlem Renaissance, the Civil Rights movement, Black Power movement, urban unrest, affirmative action, and the new reparations movement.

HIS 429. ECCE: Civil Rights Movement of the Twentieth Century. 4 Hours.

This discussion course examines the connections between the oral histories of the civil rights movement, the intellectual contributions of African American essayists to traditions of thought in United States history in the twentieth century and the political activism of educated professionals and grass-roots community figures. Course Information: Same as AAS 433. This course fulfills an Engaged Citizenship Common Experience requirement at UIS in the area of U.S. Communities.

HIS 431. Colonial America. 4 Hours.

Survey of the establishment and development of England's North American colonies between 1585 and 1763. Emphasis primarily on land use, economic development, religions, and social history.

HIS 432. Revolutionary America. 4 Hours.

Examines the social trends, economic rivalries, and political disputes that together created the American Revolution. Course begins with the Stamp Act Crisis of 1765 and follows the developments and conflicts through the presidential election of 1792.

HIS 433. United States, 1790-1840. 4 Hours.

Examines the first decades of the new republic, including early industrialization, settlement of the frontier, Manifest Destiny, the War of 1812, the cotton economy, and Jacksonianism.

HIS 434. United States, 1840-1890. 4 Hours.

Examines antebellum U.S. plus the Civil War and Reconstruction. Also explores cultural and social history, including Victorianism and the women's movement.

HIS 435. United States, 1890-1945. 4 Hours.

Examines the emergence of the U.S. as an industrial and world power, progressivism, World War I, the 1920's, the Great Depression, and World War II. Focus is on political, cultural, social, and foreign relations history.

HIS 436. United States, 1945-Present. 4 Hours.

Examines domestic and foreign policy issues in the post-World War II period with an emphasis on how the Cold War shaped contemporary America. Focus is on political, cultural, social, and foreign relations history.

HIS 437. The Sixties. 4 Hours.

Examines the social movements of the decade, including the Civil Rights movement, the antiwar movement, the student movement, the women's movement, and the counterculture. Explores how these movements emerged in the post-World War II period and their legacies for the 1940's and beyond.

HIS 438. American Environmental History. 4 Hours.

Study of the American land that examines human attitudes toward both the wilderness and the quest for resources and the actual use and abuse of the natural world. Beginning with the 16th century, the course focuses on the conflicting advocacies of exploitation, preservation, and conservation. Course Information: Same as ENS 418.

HIS 439. American Agricultural History. 4 Hours.

Survey of the history of American agriculture from colonial times to the present. Topics include farm building and farming techniques, farm life, and the production of cash commodities. Attention to the impact of transportation, technology, education, science, and shifting population patterns on the farmer, the farm community, and American agriculture.

HIS 440. Topics In U.S. History. 4 Hours.

Special topics ranging from early American history to the recent past. Course Information: May be repeated if topics vary. Students may register in more than one section per term.

HIS 441. The Civil War and Reconstruction. 4 Hours.

A study of the origins of the American Civil War, the war itself, and post-war Reconstruction. Major topics include the Market Revolution; Slavery and Racism; and social, cultural, political, economic, and legal impacts of the conflict.

HIS 442. American Urban History. 4 Hours.

Examines the development of American urban centers from 1800 to the present. Demographic, sociological, economic, and political aspects of the urbanizing process will be discussed, as well as the impact urban populations have had on American culture over time.

HIS 443. American Foreign Relations in the 20th Century. 4 Hours.

Examines the emergence of the U.S. as a world power and the ways in which it used that power. Focus on the relationships between foreign policies and domestic politics. Topics include the Open Door policy, U.S./Latin American relations, the World Wars, the Cold War, the Vietnam War, and peace movements.

HIS 444. The American Presidency. 4 Hours.

Examines the definition and evolution of the powers and responsibilities of the office of the president from Washington to the present. Considers constitutional and political dimensions of the expansion of the power and prestige of the presidency.

HIS 445. Intellectual Origins of the American Revolution. 4 Hours.

This course introduces students to the ideas and texts that influenced the leaders of the American Revolution. The Founding Fathers had studied classical Greek and Roman through eighteenth-century European thinkers. Americans used these ideas to articulate their critique of the British, and debate the formation of a new government.

HIS 446. American Political Thought from the Revolution to the 20th Century. 4 Hours.

In this course, students will explore the foundational ideas of the American Revolution and investigate how these ideas have been used to shape, justify and challenge the structures of American society. Students will read texts, including the Federalist Papers, and authors such as Tocqueville, Thoreau, Lincoln, Jane Addams, Theodore Roosevelt and Martin Luther King.

HIS 449. American Westward Expansion. 4 Hours.

Examines the peopling of America over four centuries of expansion. Considers patterns of frontier settlement, development, and community building on a moving frontier. Special topics include study of the Turner Thesis, role of ethnicity and social mobility in migration and regional development. The impact of expansion on indigenous peoples will be evaluated to the near present.

HIS 450. Major Figures in History. 4 Hours.

Focuses on important individuals from the past. Course Information: May be repeated if topics vary. Students may register in more than one section per term.

HIS 452. American Revivalism and Christian Religion. 4 Hours.

The development of American revivalism from colonial times to the near present, and the part American Christian denominations, sects, and communitarian religious organizations played in the shaping of revivalism, evangelicalism, and religious reform movements.

HIS 453. ECCE: Women of Color and Minority Women. 4 Hours.

The experience of American women of color is at the center of this course. Interdisciplinary consideration of the intersection of race, class, and gender in the lives of women past and present. Course Information: Same as AAS 403, SOA 451,SWK 462, and WGS 403. This course fulfills an Engaged Citizenship Common Experience requirement at UIS in the area of U.S. Communities.

HIS 454. ECCE: History of the Family. 4 Hours.

The modern family in comparative and historical perspective. Selected themes -- changing patterns of household, intimacy, gender -- explored historically to understand their present importance. Course Information: Same as SWK 454, and WGS 454. This course fulfills an Engaged Citizenship Common Experience requirement at UIS in the area of U.S. Communities.

HIS 455. Fashion History. 4 Hours.

This course examines the history of fashion in the U.S. from the American Revolution through the present. The course considers how fashion had been used as a means of crafting individual, group, and national identities, and how race, class gender, and sexuality have impacted fashion culture. This course reflects on how fashion has worked to both construct and destabilize existing social structures, and fashion's potential as a liberating and oppressive force.

HIS 456. ECCE: Rebels and Revolutionaries: Female Activism in the United States. 4 Hours.

Throughout U.S. history, women have participated in movements designed to undermine and defend existing hierarchies of race, class, gender, and sexual orientation within American society. In this course, we will examine how notions of female activism have changed from the eighteenth century up to the present, considering how race, class, and sexual orientation have shaped women's access to public space and how women have shaped the activist movements in which they have taken part.

HIS 457. ECCE: Women and Gender in the U.S. South, 1607-1877. 4 Hours.

This course examines the histories of women and gender in the U.S. South from 1607 to 1877. The class will consider how ideas about masculinity and femininity shaped the lives and experiences of Native American, African American, and white Southern men and women in the seventeenth, eighteenth, and nineteenth centuries.This course fulfills an Engaged Citizenship Common Experience requirement at UIS in the area of U.S. Communities.

HIS 459. World Environmental Thought. 4 Hours.

Examines human reactions to natural surroundings in a variety of cultural contexts, including ancient Chinese, Hindu, African, American Indian, and Judeo-Christian. Compares and contrasts attitudes concerning the value of wilderness and the exploitation of natural resources. Considers the problem of understanding nature and the relationship with nature as human beings. Course Information: Same as ENS 412.

HIS 460. Studies in Latin American History. 4 Hours.

Studies include roots of Latin American history, Latin American history since independence, revolution in modern Latin America, and the history of Brazil. Course Information: May be repeated up to 2 time(s) if topics vary.

HIS 461. Europe in the 18th Century: The Enlightenment. 4 Hours.

Cultural and intellectual history of the Enlightenment focusing on formative ideas of modernism (freedom, reason, equality) and movements in literature and the arts. Consideration of works by representative figures such as Voltaire, Rousseau, Hume, and Kant. Course Information: Same as PHI 459.

HIS 462. ECCE: Conflict in 19th Century Europe. 4 Hours.

This course explores political, cultural, and international conflicts in Europe from the French Revolution to 1890. It examines the conflicting political ideologies that shaped the century, struggles between church and state, the impact of modernity on religion, nationalism, anti-Semitism, and the revolutions and wars that continuously threatened the status quo.Course Information: This course fulfills an Engaged Citizenship Common Experience requirement at UIS in the area of Global Awareness.

HIS 463. Europe In The 20th Century. 4 Hours.

Study of the political, socioeconomic, cultural, and colonial history of Europe from the turn of the century to the present. Special emphasis on the importance of ideology in shaping society, the transforming effects of war and depression, and Europe's changing role in the international order.

HIS 467. Renaissance and Reformation Europe. 4 Hours.

Intellectual and cultural history of the European Renaissance and Christian Reformation, 1350-1700. Themes include Italian city-states, Humanism, the relationship between the Renaissance and Christian Reformation, and the cultural, socio-political, and international impact of the Protestant, Catholic and English Reformations.

HIS 468. History Of Spain. 4 Hours.

A general survey of the history of Spain from the times of the Iberians and Romans to the present, focusing on the rise and fall of the Spanish empire and monarchy and the emergence of a new democratic nation.

HIS 470. Topics in 20th Century World History. 4 Hours.

Topics such as imperialism, holocaust and genocide, war and revolution, environmental history, gender history, biography, intellectual history. Students may take additional sections for credit, but must study different topics each time. Course Information: May be repeated if topics vary. Students may register in more than one section per term.

HIS 471. ECCE: The Pacific War: World War II in East Asia. 4 Hours.

This class takes its theme the different ways in which inhabitants of countries bordering the Pacific, particularly China, Japan, Korea, and the United States, experienced World War II in different ways. It also explores how the Second World War became one of the defining elements in understanding relations between these countries today. Themes such as total war, colonialism, race, and memory will be covered. Course Information:This course fulfills an Engaged Citizenship Common Experience requirement at UIS in the area of Global Awareness.

HIS 472. Imperial Russia. 4 Hours.

Examines significant aspects of Russian political, cultural, and intellectual life from 1689 to the revolutions of 1917 in the broader European context. Topics will include: the expansion and dissolution of the empire from Tsar Peter I to World War I; Russian Orthodoxy and society; the emergence of the intelligentsia and the revolutionary tradition; and major intellectual/cultural movements from the Enlightenment to the Silver Age. Course readings will consist of selections from primary and secondary sources, including literary works from the period.

HIS 473. History of the Soviet Union. 4 Hours.

Examines the culture, society, economy, and diplomacy of the U.S.S.R. from 1917 to 1991. Themes include the Bolshevik revolution, civil war, Leninism and Stalinism, World War II and the Cold War, and the collapse of the Soviet System.

HIS 474. Vietnamese History. 4 Hours.

Focuses on the internal dynamics of Vietnamese society and politics from 1800 to the present with attention to colonial, economic, gender, and international issues.

HIS 475. ECCE: Nationalism and Imperialism. 4 Hours.

Is national identity inherent - are we all born with a national identity? Or is it something that is shaped by historical and social events? Historians have debated this question for many decades and we will consider this question in this course. In what ways have national identities in various parts of the world been shaped by the historical experiences of Imperialism in its various forms? In this course, we will explore the debates around how "national" identities have been shaped in the 19th and 20th centuries. We will explore a series of case studies that allow us to consider a variety of angles and approaches to this question. Course Information: This course fulfills an Engaged Citizenship Common Experience requirement at UIS in the area of Global Awareness.

HIS 476. Modern China. 4 Hours.

Examination of the main trends, events, and problems in 19th and 20th century China. Topics of study include the intrusion of the West, rebellions and revolutions, gender issues, popular culture, and environmental problems.

HIS 477. Premodern Japan. 4 Hours.

Examination of the social, cultural, and political developments of premodern Japan. Topics of study include literature and the arts in the Nara and Heian periods; the age of the Samurai; religions, including Shinto and Zen Buddhism; and popular culture.

HIS 478. Modern Japan. 4 Hours.

Examination of the main events, trends, and problems in 19th and 20th century Japan. Topics of study include the "opening" to the West, the social costs of modernization, the Pacific war, post-war economic recovery and social change, and Japan's current international status.

HIS 479. ECCE: From Vikings to Hackers: A Pirate's World History. 4 Hours.

Course seeks to understand the historical transformations across time and to compare the manifestations across cultures of the popular, but elusive figure of the pirate. We will attempt to understand how these figures may have thought of themselves, how they were so labeled by land-based authorities, and how their histories were appropriated and romanticized for ideological ends. Course Information: This course fulfills an Engaged Citizenship Common Experience requirement at UIS in the area of Global Awareness.

HIS 480. Topics in Pre-Modern World History. 4 Hours.

Special topics covering diverse geographic areas in the Pre-modern period (ca. 3300 BCE - 1500 CE). May be repeated if topics vary. Students may register in more than one section per term.

HIS 481. Women in Chinese and Japanese History. 4 Hours.

Exploration of the histories of women in China and Japan over the last several centuries, with special attention to their changing roles and status in the 20th century. Course Information: Same as WGS 481.

HIS 482. Samurai in History and Romance. 4 Hours.

This course explores the evolution of samurai in historical sources, artistic representations, and ideological constructions. Topics include debates over the origins and meaning of samurai, gender and samurai, premodern and modern romanticization, cultures of warfare and violence, and samurai lordship and the state. Course Information: No previous knowledge of Japan is expected.

HIS 483. ECCE: Anime, History, and Memory. 4 Hours.

This course employs a series of case studies of Japanese animation (anime) to explore the relationships between popular culture narratives and official, public narratives about the past in modern nation states. Topics include explorations of colonialism, environment, ethnicity, gender, modernization, nationalism, race, revolutions, and WWII. Course Information: This course fulfills an Engaged Citizenship Common Experience requirement at UIS in the area of Global Awareness.

HIS 484. History of Sexuality in America. 4 Hours.

Undergraduate seminar on sexual behaviors, discourses, and identities in US history. Topics include sexuality and conquest, race, slavery; prostitution and sex reform movements; sex education, birth control, obscenity law and pornography; medicalization of sexuality, sexology and sexual science; sexual revolutions; historical emergence of sexual identities. Course Information: Same as WGS 484. Intended for upper division students.

HIS 485. Cold War and the Middle East. 4 Hours.

In this course we will study the Middle Ease in connection with the global politics of the Cold War era in order to gain an understanding of the ways in which political, economic, cultural and other aspects of society in the region interacted with the US and USSR. Course Information: This course is an upper division research seminar in History. Students taking this course for graduate credit will be expected to do additional work.

HIS 487. History of Christmas. 4 Hours.

Seminar on the origins and development of the celebration of Christmas. Themes include early Christian Nativity traditions, the date of Christmas, devotional literature, liturgical texts, hymnography, art, global perspectives on the celebration and Christmas traditions.

HIS 488. Eastern Christianity. 4 Hours.

Introduction to the history of Christian peoples in the Middle East, India and Asia from the first century through the sixteenth century. The course focuses on significant figures and their contributions to eastern cultures. Themes include martyrdom, aceticism, intellectual learning, and women in the Syriac tradition.

HIS 489. Sex, Science, History. 4 Hours.

Advanced survey of scientific knowledge production on human sexual difference in Western culture from the Greeks until now. Course Information: Intended for Juniors, Seniors, Grad students. Same as PSC 489 and WGS 489.

HIS 499. Independent Study: Special Topics in History. 1-8 Hours.

Independent and directed readings on an individual topic for students in history. Students should make arrangements with an appropriate faculty member. Course Information: May be repeated to a maximum of 8 hours.

HIS 501. Graduate History Colloquium. 4 Hours.

Introduction to the graduate program that assists students in diagnosing skills, designing the education plan, learning research methods, using various bibliographical resources, and examining professional conflicts among historians. Research project. Successful completion satisfies communication skills requirements.

HIS 502. Public History Colloquium. 4 Hours.

Concepts of public history, including subject areas, techniques, and ethical issues. The application of historical knowledge and methods to the administration, preservation, and interpretation of historical resources as well as historical analysis of public policy issues.

HIS 503. Researching and Writing History. 4 Hours.

Seminar emphasizing research in primary sources. Includes critical examination of historical writing, exploration of research and writing techniques, and completion of an advanced research paper.

HIS 504. American Material Life. 4 Hours.

Examines interdisciplinary theories, methodological approaches, and applications of material culture studies to the study of history. Focuses on the study of artifacts and the way historians and museums use them to research, document, and interpret past and present.

HIS 505. Historic Environmental Preservation. 4 Hours.

Preservation policies and their applications in planning are considered. History of preservation movements and of American architecture and landscapes are examined, as well as current preservation technologies. Case studies of the politics and economics of preservation. Field work required. Course Information: Same as ENS 505.

HIS 506. American Architectural History. 4 Hours.

Examines the distinct movements in American architectural styles, building techniques, and landscape design, and in trend-setting architecture from America's past. Pays special attention to the designs of residential and public buildings.

HIS 507. Museum and Society. 4 Hours.

Explores the ways museums have been used since the 1800's and the functions they serve today. Indoor and outdoor history, art, folk life, and science museums are considered. Focus is on museums as learning resources and analysis of problems in communicating realities.

HIS 508. Archival Management. 4 Hours.

Examines concepts and methods of archival management and considers issues in acquiring, preserving, evaluating, and making archival resources accessible. Additional focus is on creative research and developing means to reach broad publics.

HIS 510. Graduate Readings Seminar. 4 Hours.

Intensive readings in a defined topic area. Seminar format emphasizes group discussion of historical methods and ideas. Course Information: Offered each semester. May be repeated as long as topics vary.

HIS 511. Museum/Historic Sites Methods. 4 Hours.

Examines collection management and conservation, research, interpretation, educational programming, exhibit preparation, and administration. Explores collection development in the past and current concepts of collecting "today for tomorrow".

HIS 515. History and Digital Media. 4 Hours.

This course introduces students to the digital skills necessary for conducting and presenting historical research. Topics covered include website design and management, familiarity with mapping, and database software. Students will produce final projects showcasing research using digital platforms.

HIS 520. Oral History Methods. 4 Hours.

Mastery of oral history technique, including interviewing, transcription, and editing. Includes technical and conceptual literature, collateral fields, and professional concerns. Student work added to UIS oral history collection.

HIS 525. Policy History. 4 Hours.

Focuses on the application of historical methods and historical logic to the formulation of public policy and the analysis of policy issues. Includes careful historical examination of selected public policies. Readings and case studies drawn principally from modern U.S. history.

HIS 560. Position Essay and Historiography. 1-8 Hours.

Supervised advanced research and essay to fulfill MA closure requirement for students pursing the European and World History concentration. NOTE: If the historiography is not completed by the time eight hours are accrued, students must register for HIS 561 for zero credit hours (one billable hour) in all subsequent semesters until the requirements are completed. Course Information: Prerequisite: successful completion of the core requirements HIS 501, HIS 503, or HIS 510. Restricted to HIS graduate students with European and World History concentration.

HIS 561. Position Essay and Historiography Continuing Enrollment. 0 Hours.

Refer to NOTE in course description for HIS 560. May be repeated. Course Information: Restricted to HIS graduate students.

HIS 570. Public History Internship and Project. 1-8 Hours.

Supervised applied study in public history used to develop a project to meet history M.A. requirements. Maximum of eight hours of history credit. NOTE: If the project is not completed by the time eight hours are accrued in continuing enrollment, students must register for HIS 571 for zero credit hours (one billable hour) in all subsequent semesters until the project is completed. Course Information: May be repeated to a maximum of 8 hours. Prerequisite: Successful completion of at least three of the core requirements (HIS 501, HIS 502, HIS 503 or HIS 510).

HIS 571. Public History Internship and Project Continuing Enrollment. 0 Hours.

Refer to NOTE in course description for HIS 570. Course Information: May be repeated.

HIS 580. Thesis. 1-8 Hours.

Historical research for the required master's research essay. NOTE: If the thesis is not completed by the time eight hours are accrued in continuing enrollment, students must register for HIS 581 for zero credit hours (one billable hour) in all subsequent semesters until the thesis is completed. Course Information: May be repeated to a maximum of 8 hours. Prerequisite: Successful completion of at least three of the core requirements (HIS 501, HIS 502, HIS 503 or HIS 510).

HIS 581. Thesis Continuing Enrollment. 0 Hours.

Refer to NOTE in course description for HIS 580. Course Information: May be repeated.

HIS 599. Independent Study: Special Topics in History. 1-8 Hours.

Independent and directed readings on an individual topic for graduate students in history. Students should make arrangements with an appropriate faculty member. Course Information: May be repeated to a maximum of 8 hours.