Public Policy

Bachelor of Arts

www.uis.edu/politicalscience/
Email: pos@uis.edu
Office Phone: (217) 206-6646
Office Location: PAC 350

The Public Policy B.A. program at UIS is located within the department of Political Science and instructed by faculty and practitioners with diverse public policy expertise. The Public Policy Bachelor’s Degree curriculum offers comprehensive training in the field of public policy, including applied policy implementation and program evaluation, which is especially important given the program’s location in the state capital of Illinois.

Students interested in careers as lawmakers, policy analysts, legislative aides, community activists, lobbyists, graduate study of public policy, and attorneys are encouraged to apply. The program’s two-track BA degree option offers an emphasis in American Public Policy or Comparative/International Public Policy, equipping students with the specialized skills desired to pursue advanced studies in public policy, political science, law, and public management.

The Public Policy Bachelor’s Degree curriculum addresses questions surrounding the ethics of policy-making, the conditions in which policies are made, how programs should be implemented, and whether they are effective. Courses provide in-depth consideration of health, education, labor law, social welfare, environmental, or agricultural policy while equipping students with the tools to participate in the advocacy, drafting, and analysis of public policy.

Practical experience is enhanced by the degree requirement that students complete a six credit-hour internship with a local government or policymaking agency as part of the Public Policy Bachelor’s Degree curriculum. Internships are designed to introduce students to various post-graduate professional options and can be tailored to students’ unique policy interests. Students will be assisted in obtaining internship opportunities.

The Bachelor's Degree

American Track Degree Requirements

Comparative/International Track Degree Requirements

Advising

Entering students are assigned to our undergraduate college advisor when they declare Public Policy as their major field of study. They are also assigned a faculty advisor. After their first semester, when they are acquainted with the faculty and are more knowledgeable about the department and the campus, students may wish to select a specific faculty advisor. The course of study for the B.A. is planned jointly with the college advisor, so students should consult with their advisor before each registration and from time-to-time during the semester.

One distinct advantage of the program is its location in Springfield, affording opportunities to participate directly in public policy work. Cooperation between UIS and governmental and private agencies provides many opportunities for experiential learning in public affairs and public policy.

Grading Policy

The Public Policy program has no grading policy different from that used by the UIS campus.

Honors in Public Policy

Students with at least 15 completed hours in Public Policy courses with a minimum 3.50 GPA in those courses may apply for participation in the department’s honors program. To graduate with Honors in Public Policy, students must successfully complete an independent research project in PSC 488 Honors Closing Seminar. Students are also able to take a graduate-level course in Political Science as an elective. (Please be aware that any graduate-level course counted toward credit in a student’s undergraduate degree cannot later be counted toward a graduate degree.)

Communication Skills

Both the study and the practice of public policy require that students/citizens speak, write, and read well. These skills are also critical for successful careers in government, law, and business.

Engaged Citizenship Common Experience (ECCE) Requirements

Students are required to complete a minimum of 10 semester hours of Engaged Citizenship Common Experience (ECCE) requirements in the areas of U.S. Communities, Global Awareness, Engagement Experience, and ECCE Speaker Series.

In Public Policy, all majors must complete six hours of Engagement Experience – an internship program which emphasizes improvement of the student’s ability to learn from experience, career assessment, relationships between theory and practice, and realistic appreciation of public policy. The department requires that students use six hours of ECCE credit toward the Engagement Experience.

If a student can justify a different distribution of the 10-hour requirement, he/she may claim an exception to the rule by petitioning the Political Science department.

Students must also take a U.S. Communities course as a part of completing ECCE requirements.

Degree Program Program Type Dept Application Materials and Admission Criteria Prerequisite Course Requirements Department ADM Review Dept Conditional Admits Dept Appeal Process
Public Policy BAOn campus*No additional admission requirements beyond the general UIS criteriaProgram Prerequisites:
ECO 201 Introduction to Microeconomics (3 hours)
ECO 202 Introduction to Macroeconomics (3 hours)

Prerequisite (American Track): PSC 201 Intro to the American Political System (3 hours)

Prerequisite (Comparative/International Track): PSC 371 Intro to Comparative Politics(3 hours)
N/AN/AN/A

Courses

PSC 171. Comparative Political Cultures. 3 Hours.

This introductory course in comparative politics provides an interdisciplinary examination of the formation, content, and impact of political culture on a nation's economic, legal, social, and political system. A wide variety of current and historical political cultures are examined. Course Information: This course fulfills a general education requirement at UIS in the area of Comparative Societies Social Sciences.

PSC 174. The Cold War and American Political Culture. 3 Hours.

This course uses a variety of disciplinary perspectives to examine the political culture of the United States during the Cold War era. We will explore the interaction between politics and the other spheres of American life. Course Information: This course fulfills a general education requirement at UIS in the area of Freshman Seminar and a general education requirement at UIS in the area of Social and Behavioral Sciences.

PSC 201. Introduction to the American Political System. 3 Hours.

Designed to provide an introduction to the American political system for both majors and non-majors. Examines the role and function of governments in providing for a variety of public goods. In addition to examining the system's institutions and political behavior, special attention will be devoted to federalism and the role of the states. Course Information: Same as LES 201. This course fulfills a general education requirement at UIS in the area of Social and Behavioral Sciences (IAI Code: S5 900).

PSC 202. Introduction to the American Legal System. 3 Hours.

Provides basic understanding of and introduction to the American Legal System including: the Illinois and federal courts systems and the concept of federalism. Emphasis on how the American legal system works, how it differs from other major legal systems, the basic elements of tort, contract, criminal and property law as well as basic criminal and civil procedure. Discussion will include current legal controversies. Course Information: Same as LES 202. Will require participation in off-campus field trips beyond scheduled class time. This course fulfills a general education requirement at UIS in the area of Social and Behavioral Sciences.

PSC 203. State of the State. 3 Hours.

Introduction to the structure, operations, and politics of state government in Illinois, examining the interplay of these factors in determining public policy on key issues facing the state. Course Information: Same as PAR 203. This course fulfills a general education requirement at UIS in the area of Social and Behavioral Sciences.

PSC 204. Comparative State Politics. 3 Hours.

Introduction to American government comparing state governmental structures, politics, and state policies. Course covers state diversity, reform and renewal of state governments, and the impact of institutions. Course Information: This course fulfills a general education requirement at UIS in the area of Social and Behavioral Sciences.

PSC 205. ECCE: Global Women. 4 Hours.

Women are actively changing the world and yet continue to face issues of gender stereotypes, undervalued work and unequal access. How have women in Somalia been active in the face of war? What does it mean for women to work the night shift in a call center in India? Course Information: Same as SOA 204 and WGS 204. This course fulfills an Engaged Citizenship Common Experience requirement at UIS in the area of Global Awareness.

PSC 242. Statistics for Social Sciences. 3 Hours.

This course explains the basic principles of statistical analysis used throughout much of the social sciences. Concepts include sampling, variables, descriptive statistics, visual presentation of data, basic probability, principles of inference, and basic statistical tests. These concepts are taught by examining real-world data through the lens of political campaigns. Course Information: Prerequisite: Intermediate Algebra and Intermediate Geometry with a grade of C or better. This course fulfills a general education requirement at UIS in the area of Mathematics Statistics.

PSC 300. Internship / Political Science. 3 Hours.

This course, taken in conjunction with EXL 300, fulfils the internship requirement for Political Science majors. Course Information: Students may enroll after the EXL project outline is approved by the course instructor.

PSC 311. Introduction to Public Policy. 3 Hours.

This course examines the design and implementation of public policy in the United States. The historical and political origins of national health and social welfare programs such as Social Security, Medicare, and Medicaid are considered, as well as recent policy reforms such as the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act.

PSC 325. Introduction to Political Philosophy. 3 Hours.

Survey of the great thinkers who have raised the perennial normative questions of political philosophy: What is the nature of a good regime? What is politics? The course will begin with Plato and Aristotle and conclude with late 20th century theory. Course Information: This course fulfills a general education requirement at UIS in the area of Social and Behavioral Sciences.

PSC 326. Ideas, Ethics, and Public Policy. 3 Hours.

This course examines the role that ideas play in the formation and analysis of public policy. A variety of relevant ideologies will be explored, as well as the vehicles used to impart an ideological influence on policy, such as advocacy groups and think tanks. The course also explores the ethical dimensions of public policy.

PSC 330. Topics: Political Studies I. 3 Hours.

Selected topics in Political Studies. Course Information: Maybe repeated if topics vary.

PSC 331. ECCE: Political Ideas and Ideologies. 3 Hours.

Course focuses on the role of ideas in politics and assumes that ideas shape politics and history. It explores the prominent ideas and ideologies in light of different global perspectives and attempts to better understand our world through these prisms. Course Information: This course fulfills an Engaged Citizenship Common Experience requirement at UIS in the area of Global Awareness.

PSC 333. ECCE: Sexual Orientation and Public Policy. 3 Hours.

Interdisciplinary examination of factual basis of majority ideas about sexual orientation, gender identity, or sexuality used to assign important legal rights and disabilities to lesbian, gay bisexual, transgender and queer communities. Explores political movements and issues involved in the struggle for civil rights for sexual minorities. Requires an open mind. Course Information: Same as LES 333, SOA 333, and WGS 333. This course fulfills an Engaged Citizenship Common Experience requirement at UIS in the area of U.S. Communities.

PSC 334. ECCE: Sexuality, Law, and Politics. 3 Hours.

This course examines the U.S. sexual minority community through the prism of politics and law. It explores the history and contemporary dynamics of the LGBT rights movement and investigates the ways in which dynamics in U.S. law politics have limited and advanced the movement. Course Information: Same as LES 334, SOA 334, and WGS 334. This course fulfills an Engaged Citizenship Common Experience requirement at UIS in the area of U.S. Communities.

PSC 336. Contemporary American Political Philosophy. 4 Hours.

Focuses on four late 20th century political philosophies: liberalism, libertarianism, communitarianism, and conservatism. Considers left-wing vs right-wing approaches to social redistribution and individualistic vs. communitarian views of the person as the basis for political theories. Readings include selections from Rawls, Nozick, Walzer, Guttman, and Taylor. Course Information: Same as PHI 336. This course fulfills a general education requirement at UIS in the area of Social and Behavioral Sciences.

PSC 351. The American Jury. 3 Hours.

Provides an interdisciplinary examination of the fascinating socio-legal institution that is the jury. Encourages critical analysis of how laypersons from different communities make legal decisions as well as the jury's history and role in both civil and criminal trials. Course Information: Same as LES 351.

PSC 353. ECCE: Women Across Cultures. 4 Hours.

Addresses the complexity of "Third World" women's lives including development and structural adjustment, reproductive rights and other health issues, violence against women, and highly effective activism. Course Information: Same as SOA 353 and WGS 353. This course fulfills an Engaged Citizenship Common Experience requirement at UIS in the area of Global Awareness.

PSC 354. Philosophy of Law. 3 Hours.

Philosophy of justice, law and legal systems. Emphasizes origins, purposes and practices of legal institutions. Examines major legal theories about the nature of law and its place in political system. Course Information: Same as LES 354.

PSC 357. ECCE: LGBTQ and Allies Peer Education. 3 Hours.

Experiential learning course that seeks to combat homophobia, transphobia, and heterosexism by training students in peer-education skills focused on LGBTQ issues. Interdisciplinary course materials and topics focusing on interpersonal communication, group facilitation, multicultural/social justice, and queer theory. Students become peer educators that provide workshop activities throughout the year on campus. Course Information: Same as SOA 357 and WGS 357. This course fulfills an Engaged Citizenship Common Experience requirement at UIS in the area of Engagement Experience.

PSC 371. ECCE: Introduction to Comparative Politics. 3 Hours.

This course provides students with the basic concepts and theories of the field of comparative politics. Topics include: comparative systems and institutions, electoral politics, and democratic development. Course Information: This course fulfills an Engaged Citizenship Common Experience requirement at UIS in the area of Global Awareness.

PSC 372. ECCE: Global Issues. 3 Hours.

Global issues are problems that transcend national boundaries, cannot be resolved by countries acting separately, and require policy changes now because the problems are long-term. This course will look at four areas: security, economics, the environment, and human rights. Course Information: This course fulfills a Engaged Citizenship Common Experience requirement at UIS area of Global Awareness.

PSC 373. ECCE: Introduction to International Relations. 3 Hours.

This course provides students with the basic concepts and theories of the study of international relations. Topics include: the international system, the balance of power, and economic interdependence. Course Information: This course fulfills an Engaged Citizenship Common Experience requirement at UIS in the area of Global Awareness. 420188.

PSC 376. Trial Advocacy. 3 Hours.

This course is built around a simulated trial in which students play the roles of attorneys and witnesses. Students will develop trial advocacy skills, study courtroom procedures, and etiquette, and learn substantive and evidentiary law. Students will also enhance numerous transferable skills by participating in American Mock Trial Association competitions. Course Information: Same as LES 376.

PSC 402. Legislative Politics. 3,4 Hours.

Legislative decision making in the state legislature and United States Congress. The law-making process as a system involving interplay of competing personalities, interests, and actors. Special attention to Illinois. Course Information: Undergraduates are restricted to 3 credit hour sections; graduates are restricted to 4 credit hour sections.

PSC 403. Public Opinion. 3,4 Hours.

A survey of the extensive literature dealing with American public opinion. Potential topics include survey research (polling), ideology, democratic norms and values, heuristics and cognition, the role of information and learning, medial influence, racial attitudes, and presidential popularity. Designed to leave the student with a better understanding of the role of public opinion in democracy, what the public feels on a variety of topics, and an appreciation for the complexities inherent in measuring public opinion. Course Information: Undergraduates are restricted to 3 credit hour sections; graduates are restricted to 4 credit hour sections.

PSC 404. ECCE: African Americans and American Politics. 4 Hours.

Examines political, economic, and social factors affecting African American participation in global, national, state, and local politics. Organized to compare perspectives, ideologies, and strategies as they developed and changed over time, this course explores four areas: Government; Strategies for Change; Sociopolitical Situations; Politics of Expression and Identity. Course Information: Same as AAS 432. This course fulfills an Engaged Citizenship Common Experience requirement at UIS in the areas of U.S. Communities.

PSC 405. Illinois Government and Politics. 3,4 Hours.

Policy-making process as it operates in Illinois. Major topics include constitutional structure, political culture, role of parties and interest groups, initiation of public policy, legislative process, role of the governor, politics of the budgetary process, implementation of public policy. Course Information: Undergraduates are restricted to 3 credit hour sections; graduates are restricted to 4 credit hour sections.

PSC 406. The American Presidency. 3,4 Hours.

Nature and scope of the American presidency -- both historically and analytically. Topical attention given to the views of the framers of the Constitution and to problems of presidential management, leadership, and prerogative. Course Information: Undergraduates are restricted to 3 credit hour sections; graduates are restricted to 4 credit hour sections.

PSC 408. American Political Behavior. 3,4 Hours.

Examination of mass public opinion, electoral behavior, and participation in American politics. Special attention is given to the role of the mass media. Course Information: Undergraduates are restricted to 3 credit hour sections; graduates are restricted to 4 credit hour sections.

PSC 409. Political Parties and Interest Groups. 3,4 Hours.

Examination of interest groups and political parties in American politics. Special attention is given to the impact of mass media on contemporary political organizations. Course Information: Undergraduates are restricted to 3 credit hour sections; graduates are restricted to 4 credit hour sections.

PSC 410. Policy Analysis and Implementation. 3,4 Hours.

Designed to deepen students' understanding of public policy processes at the federal, state, and local levels. The first part of the course explores the dynamics of issue and agenda formation at the federal and state levels. The second part focuses on public policy implementation processes. Students conduct library and field research on existing intergovernmental policies and programs to trace the dynamics issue and policies and programs at the state and local levels. Course Information: Prerequisites: PSC 201 or PSC 371; Undergraduates are restricted to 3 credit hour sections; graduates are restricted to 4 credit hour sections.

PSC 412. Political Psychology. 3,4 Hours.

Both political science and psychology study how individuals interact with their environment, other individuals and groups. We will use theories and findings from both disciplines to gain deeper insights into political processes and decisions. Likely topics include stereotyping, trust, schemas, heuristics, media effects, social identity, and political tolerance. Course Information: Same as PSY 433. Undergraduates are restricted to 3 credit hour sections; graduates are restricted to 4 credit hour sections.

PSC 414. Appellate Advocacy: Moot Court. 3,4 Hours.

In this course, students will study legal argumentation and prepare for, and participate in, the Model Illinois Government Moot Court Competition. In addition to completing assignments about legal reasoning and argumentation, students will examine and analyze the competition's fact pattern and will engage in role-playing simulations as lawyers and judges. Course Information: Same as LES 413.

PSC 415. The Supreme Court and Judicial Politics. 3,4 Hours.

The place of the Constitution and Supreme Court in American policy, using both empirical and case materials. Focus on structure and powers of national government, with special emphasis on the Supreme Court as a policy-making institution. Course Information: Same as LES 415.

PSC 416. The American Constitution and Civil Liberties. 3,4 Hours.

Civil liberties constitutional law, with examination of the Supreme Court's role in the definition and development of civil liberties. Emphasis on Bill of Rights and Civil War Amendments. Course Information: Same as LES 416.

PSC 419. Environmental Law. 4 Hours.

Surveys the major federal statutes and regulatory schemes relating to environmental quality and analyzes and compares the contrasting approaches to regulation that have been used. Focuses on the interaction of law and policy and considers the role of Congress, regulatory agencies, and the courts in defining and implementing environmental mandates. Course Information: Same as ENS 419, LES 419, and MPH 419.

PSC 420. National Security Issues and the U.S. Constitution. 3,4 Hours.

Provides an historical and contemporary examination of the issues of U.S. constitutional law raised during times of heightened concern about national security. Course Information: Same as LES 420. Undergraduates are restricted to 3 credit hour sections; graduates are restricted to 4 credit hour sections.

PSC 421. Law and Inequality. 3,4 Hours.

The role of law and the legal system in creating, maintaining, and reducing inequality, with emphasis on race, class, and gender inequality in the United States. The relationship between law and the legal system and political/economic institutions and ideologies. Course Information: Same as LES 404, SOA 425, and WGS 445.

PSC 422. ECCE: Politics and Religion: Culture Wars. 4 Hours.

This ECCE course seeks to examine the multifaceted connections between politics and religion in the United States, although with a global perspective. Our goal will be to establish a dialogue on the issues that increasingly confront us about the proper role of religion in our public life. Course Information: Same as: HIS 422 and LES 422. This course fulfills an Engaged Citizenship Common Experience requirement at UIS in the area of U.S. Communities.

PSC 423. ECCE: Women and Politics. 4 Hours.

Why are there so few women in elected positions within American Government, and how does their absence affect public policy? In this class we will consider the electoral experiences of women who run for office. We will also consider whether the women who are elected to public office behave differently, and what, if any, implications such a difference might have for public policy. Course Information: Same as WGS 423. This course fulfills an Engaged Citizenship Common Experience requirement at UIS in the area of U.S. Communities.

PSC 424. Democratization and the Public Sphere. 3,4 Hours.

This course examines the limitations of election-centered notions of democracy and explores theories of the public sphere, where social movements transpire, new issues circulate, and common concerns are addressed. Classic and contemporary theories of the public sphere are introduced, including the works of Kant, Arendt, and Habermas. Course Information: Undergraduates are restricted to 3 credit hour sections; graduates are restricted to 4 credit hour sections.

PSC 425. ECCE: Democracy and Democratic Theory. 4 Hours.

This course focuses on the evolution of Western Democratic theory from the ancient Greeks to our times, emphasizing institutions and traditions associated with evolving theories. Course Information: Same as HIS 411. This course fulfills an Engaged Citizenship Common Experience requirement at UIS in the area of Global Awareness.

PSC 428. Globalization and the Future of Democracy. 4 Hours.

Democracy means that national governments must respond to and represent their own national people (the American government represents the American people). But increasing "globalization" has created new "transnational" problems beyond the democratic control of any one government. We consider classic and contemporary theories of globalization and democracy in political philosophy. Course Information: Same as PHI 428.

PSC 433. Feminist Theories. 4 Hours.

A range of feminist political theories including liberal, radical, socialist, postmodern, and global feminisms which offer different solutions to social issues such as the division of labor in the home and beyond, reproductive rights, and sexuality. Course Information: Same as PHI 411, SOA 408, and WGS 411. Prerequisite: WGS 301 is recommended but not required.

PSC 435. ECCE: American Political Thought. 3,4 Hours.

This course examines developments in political thought in the United States from the American Revolution through the end of the twentieth century. Particular attention will be paid to issues of political inclusion and exclusion on the basis of race, gender, and class/economic status. Course Information: Same as LES 435. This course fulfills an Engaged Citizenship Common Experience requirement at UIS in the area of U.S. Communities.

PSC 437. Marxist Philosophy: Past, Present, Future. 4 Hours.

We examine the origins and development of Marxist philosophy and consider its relevance today. We study essential works of Karl Marx, 18th and 19th century precursors in political theory, and contemporary Continental political philosophy dealing with the legacy of Marx's work. We analyze Marx in light of current events and debates. Course Information: Same as PHI 437.

PSC 438. Postmodern Theory: Politics and Possibility. 4 Hours.

By the 20th century, understandings of truth, reality, and history were shaken to their core. Philosophy had to come to terms with Marx, Nietzsche, and psychoanalysis. What does it mean to "be political" without certain knowledge of truth, reality, and history? What is politically possible in light of postmodernism? Course Information: Same as PHI 438.

PSC 441. Poverty, Law, and Justice. 3,4 Hours.

Addresses questions concerning what poverty is and why it exists. Will consider historical and current legal approaches to the problem of poverty, including an examination of welfare policies in the U.S. and their implications with respect to societal well-being, individual rights, and justice. Discussion of the intersection of race, gender, and poverty, and possible solutions to the problem. Course Information: Same as LES 441, SWK 441, and WGS 441.

PSC 442. Mexican Migration to the U. S.. 4 Hours.

This interdisciplinary course on Mexican migration to the US examines global power inequalities that lead to international migration. Topics include the formation of the US-Mexico border, why people migrate from Mexico, how most Mexican immigration has become "illegal," and the contributions of Mexican immigrants to the United States and Mexico. Course Information: Same as GBL 442 and SOA 442.

PSC 443. Religion, Politics, and Public Policy. 3,4 Hours.

This course considers how religious values, ideas, and communities impact laws, elections, and public policies across the United States and beyond. We will pay particular attention to the "accommodationist" or "separationist" policies that governments pursue when trying to strike a balance between preserving individuals' religious liberty and resisting undo religious influence over government institutions and public life.

PSC 444. Gender, Politics, and Public Policy. 3 Hours.

This course surveys classic and contemporary scholarship on women and gender in world politics. It is designed to motivate students to think critically about a range of issues related to gender and politics both in the United States and abroad. It introduces students to feminist theoretical frameworks for thinking about politics, as well as to empirical explorations of a variety of key topics within the larger field of gender and politics. These topics include women?s political representation, the family and public policy, as well as women's experiences with war, human rights, and globalization.

PSC 451. Empirical Political Analysis. 3,4 Hours.

Examines the empirical research process from conceptualization to data analysis and writing the research report. Particular emphasis will be given to research design and causal analysis. Empirical methods explored will include direct observation and survey research. Students will be expected to carry out an empirical research project and to write a paper on the research.

PSC 452. ECCE: Economic Analysis. 3 Hours.

This course examines the dominant theories in the study of economics, both domestic and international. Special attention will be paid to the consequences of decisions that are made for the use of land, labor capital, and other endowments that go in the production process. The interests that give rise to certain types of economic activity and not others will be analyzed with reference to specific cases. The impact of globalization on traditional societies will also be considered. This course fulfills an Engaged Citizenship Common Experience requirement at UIS in the area of Global Awareness.

PSC 453. The Politics of Reproduction. 4 Hours.

This interdisciplinary, discussion-based course will provide a critical examination of political and ideological influences on women and reproduction. Readings will focus on such themes as: birthing practices, birth control, eugenics, race and sterilization, abortion, reproductive technologies, and the political economy of wombs in the world of adoption. Course Information: Same as LES 453 and WGS 473.

PSC 455. The Politics of Prosecution. 3,4 Hours.

Through politics, people make decisions and choices about values and interests to be preferred or denied. This concept will be brought to bear on the roles of local prosecutors, state attorneys general, and Department of Justice officials. As executive-bureaucratic decision-makers, they may exercise greater power, in the aggregate, than does the judiciary. Course Information: Same as CCJ 455 and LES 455.

PSC 458. ECCE: Global Social Change and Transnational Movements. 4 Hours.

This course will draw from an interdisciplinary framework to examine the theories and research on global social change with attention to the world historical development of normative, political, and economic institutions. We will analyze the emergence of contemporary global social movements. Course Information: Same as SOA 458. This course fulfills an Engaged Citizenship Common Experience requirement at UIS in the areas of Global Awareness.

PSC 462. International Law and Organizations. 3,4 Hours.

This course will examine the major principles and concepts of international law. Students will study the sources of international law, the purposes of international organizations, and affected issues such as security, peacekeeping, ethnic conflicts, human rights, and economic and social development. Course Information: Same as LES 462. Undergraduates are restricted to 3 credit hour sections; graduates are restricted to 4 credit hour sections.

PSC 463. International Political Economy. 3,4 Hours.

Examines the important issues of the world economy including globalization, international trade and investment, the rise and impact of multinational corporations, the role of multilateral institutions, and underdevelopment and poverty alleviation. Important social issues as well as regional case studies are analyzed.

PSC 464. ECCE: Latin American Politics. 3,4 Hours.

This course explores cultural and institutional trends in Latin America and studies, in more depth, four country cases. In addition, the course analyzes the evolution of U.S. policy in Latin America and examines current foreign policy issues such as immigration, drug trafficking, and economic trade. Course Information: This course fulfills an Engaged Citizenship Common Experience requirement at UIS in the area of Global Awareness.

PSC 465. ECCE: Latina/o USA. 4 Hours.

Introduction to the study of Mexican, Puerto Rican, Cuban, Dominican, and Central/South American communities in the U.S. Main themes are immigration, identity, gender and racial constructions, labor, education, and activism. Other topics include demographic trends, political participation, and relations with origin communities in Latin America and the Caribbean. Course Information: Same as GBL 325, HIS 325, LIS 325, and SOA 325. This course fulfills an Engaged Citizenship Common Experience requirement at UIS in the area of U.S. Communities.

PSC 466. Politics of Western Europe. 3,4 Hours.

This course introduces the politics of Western Europe with a focus on its domestic political and political economic institutions, including legislatures, party, and electoral systems and welfare state structures. The last part of the course also focuses on the process of European integration. Course Information: Prerequisite: PSC 371.

PSC 468. Foreign Policy Analysis. 3,4 Hours.

This course introduces students to the study of how states formulate and implement their foreign policies. It provides an extensive overview of the concepts, methods, and frameworks of analysis to study foreign policy, alongside a survey of case studies from the foreign policies of the United States as well as some of the major actors in Europe and the Middle East. Course Information: Prerequisite: PSC 371 and 373.

PSC 470. Terrorism and Public Policy. 3,4 Hours.

Examines terrorism as a problem addressed through the public policy process at both the national and state levels. This examination addresses controversies related to problem definition, an overview of the constitutional and statutory structure in which policy responses operates, policy alternatives and critical evaluations of the policy alternatives.

PSC 472. The Law of Military Conflict. 3,4 Hours.

Examines the legal and political issues raised by military conflict. Includes the origins of modern law governing military conflicts, the definition of combatants and noncombatants in a conflict and the specifications of the military's responsibilities to those two groups, and difficulties related to adjudicating specific cases. Course Information: Same as LES 473.

PSC 473. War and Peace. 3,4 Hours.

Why war? How have political scientists attempted to explain the endemic nature of interstate violence? More recently, international relations have focused on explaining cooperation in world affairs: the "democratic peace" and economic interdependence.

PSC 474. American Foreign Policy. 3,4 Hours.

Analyzes postwar American foreign policy from the Cold War and after. Topics include American responses to Third World nationalism and revolution in South and Central America, Vietnam, and South Africa and the impact of domestic policy and "great power" role on foreign policy making.

PSC 476. International Politics of the Middle East. 3,4 Hours.

Examines the regional and global aspects of Middle East politics, with an emphasis on the Arab-Israeli dispute and the Persian Gulf area. Other topics include oil, the Islamic revival, and American policy toward the region.

PSC 477. Russian Politics. 3,4 Hours.

Explores the rise and fall of communism in the former Soviet Union. Special attention to the Gorbachev period, 1985-91. Focuses on post-communist politics in Russia and the other republics.

PSC 478. National Model United Nations. 1 Hour.

This course will prepare students for the National Model United Nations course (PSC 483) and the conference in New York City during the Spring semester. Class begins the fall semester after midterm. Course Information: This class is a prerequisite for PSC 483. Students may take the course once as credit for the Political Science program and undergraduate students may repeat the course once as a non-political science elective. Graduate students may not repeat the course. Instructor permission is required.

PSC 480. Topics In Political Science. 1-4 Hours.

Issues arising from current and important political phenomena. Course Information: May be repeated if topics vary.

PSC 482. Queer Theory. 4 Hours.

Advanced survey of texts, theories and applications of "queer theory." Topics: social, economic and political roots of queer theory; social construction of normative and deviant genders/sexualities; possibilities of queer history; uneasy relationship between sex, gender, and sexualities; gender performativity; queer interventions into popular culture. Course Information: Same as WGS 418.

PSC 483. Model United Nations. 3 Hours.

This course prepares students for the National Model United Nations conference in NYC. The course increases the understanding of the United Nations, global problems, negotiation techniques, and role-simulations. Course Information: Students may take the course once as credit for the Political Science program and undergrates may repeat the course once as a non-political science elective. Graduate students may not repeat the course. Prerequisite: PSC 478 and instructor permission are required.

PSC 485. Closing Seminar. 2 Hours.

Closing course for PSC majors. Course Information: Restricted to PSC majors. Instructor approval required.

PSC 486. Honors Closing Seminar. 2 Hours.

Closing course for political science honors majors. Independent research project is required. Course Information: Restricted to PSC majors. Instructor approval required.

PSC 487. Public Policy Closing Seminar / Capstone. 2 Hours.

Closing capstone course for Public Policy majors. Capstone research project required. Course information: Restricted to Public Policy majors.

PSC 488. Honors Public Policy Closing Seminar / Capstone. 2 Hours.

Closing capstone course for Public Policy majors with honors. Independent research project required. Course information: Restricted to Public Policy majors with at least 15 completed credit hours in the major, with a 3.50 GPA or better in those courses.

PSC 489. Sex, Science, History. 4 Hours.

Advanced survey of scientific knowledge production on human sexual difference in Western culture from the Greeks until now. Course Information: Intended for Juniors, Seniors, Grad students. Same as HIS 489 and WGS 489.

PSC 499. Tutorial. 1-4 Hours.

Intended to supplement, not supplant, regular course offerings. Students interested in a tutorial must secure the consent of the faculty member concerned before registration and submit any required documentation to him or her. Course Information: May be repeated if topics vary.

PSC 501. Introduction to the Graduate Study of Politics. 4 Hours.

Overview of the major subfields, theories, thinkers, and issues in the advanced study of politics. Particular attention is paid to the logic of social science inquiry. The course is writing and reading intensive.

PSC 502. Methods Of Inquiry. 4 Hours.

Covers quantitative and qualitative techniques for obtaining and organizing information. Lays a foundation for both academic and practical investigation questions that students will encounter throughout their careers in the field while conducting and evaluating research. Course Information: Prerequisite: PSC 451 or equivalent.

PSC 503. Graduate Research Methods. 4 Hours.

Designed to help students become more effective and better informed consumers of quantitative and qualitative political and policy research. The first part of the course covers the use of various data-gathering techniques such as surveys, non-participant observational studies, participant observation, focus groups, and similar techniques. The second part covers topics relevant to the analysis of statistical data, including exploratory data analysis techniques, probability distributions, units and levels of measurement, hypothesis testing, measures of independence, associations, and correlation. Multivariate statistical techniques and models such as the General Linear Model will be briefly reviewed as time permits. Course Information: Prerequisite: PSC 451 or equivalent.

PSC 510. Current and Emerging Public Policies. 4 Hours.

This course will examine U.S. public policies with an emphasis on new and emerging policies. Course Information: Same as PAD 510.

PSC 511. Seminar In American Politics. 4 Hours.

Pre-eminent themes and basic literature in the field of American politics. Subjects may vary.

PSC 512. Graduate Seminar in Comparative State Politics. 4 Hours.

Pre-eminent themes and basic literature in the field of American state politics. Subjects may vary.

PSC 513. Seminar in Politics and Law. 4 Hours.

Pre-eminent themes and basic literature in the field of public law. Subjects may vary. Course Information: Same as LES 513.

PSC 514. Seminar in Political Philosophy. 4 Hours.

Pre-eminent themes and basic literature in the fields of political philosophy. Subjects may vary.

PSC 515. Seminar in International Relations. 4 Hours.

Pre-eminent themes and basic literature in the field of international relations. Subjects may vary.

PSC 516. Seminar in Comparative Politics. 4 Hours.

Pre-eminent themes and basic literature in the field of comparative politics. Subjects may vary.

PSC 517. Seminar on Congress. 4 Hours.

Examines themes such as institutionalization and change in congressional representation and policy making. Subjects may vary.

PSC 518. Seminar On Public Policy. 4 Hours.

Examines themes such as agenda formation and policy implementation in the public policy process. Subjects may vary.

PSC 519. Seminar in Courts and Policymaking. 4 Hours.

This graduate seminar focus on courts as policymaking institutions and their relationship to other institutions. The wisdom, legitimacy, and efficacy of judicial policymaking will be explored, with a particular focus on courts and social policy. The extent to which courts can achieve social change is also addressed. Course Information: Same as LES 519.

PSC 525. ILSIP: Academic Seminar. 2 Hours.

Literature on legislative process and behavior, theories of representation, legislative staffing, and Illinois government and politics. Restricted to students selected as Illinois Legislative Staff Interns.

PSC 526. ILSIP: Internship. 1-6 Hours.

Restricted to students selected as Illinois Legislative Staff Interns. Credit/No Credit grading only. May be repeated to a maximum of 6 hours.

PSC 530. Graduate Internship in Political Science. 1-8 Hours.

Concentrated learning experience in an applied setting in a political science related or teaching placement. Course Information: PSC graduate students and permission of instructor.

PSC 533. Feminist Theories II. 4 Hours.

This seminar offers close readings of major theories and accompanying methodology such as socialist, postmodernist, queer and postcolonial feminism. Our analysis will draw on political studies, communications, history, anthropology, sociology and literary criticism. Topics can include sexuality, race/ethnicity, labor and subjectivity. Course Information: Same as SOA 501 and WGS 501. Prerequisite: WGS 411, or SOA 408, or PSC 433, or PHI 411.

PSC 535. Collective Action: Political Movements and Revolution. 4 Hours.

This course will explore the literature regarding collective action by socially, economically and politically subordinate groups within nations and in a transnational context.

PSC 537. Social Capital and Values. 4 Hours.

Examines various definitions of social capital and the role it plays in business and politics. The class integrates topics in business ethics, strategy and political philosophy with a research component. Course Information: Same as PHI 537.

PSC 541. Conflict and Intervention. 4 Hours.

This course will explore the literature regarding coercive and noncoercive intervention in political conflicts within nations and in the international community.

PSC 551. Constitution and National Security Issues. 4 Hours.

Analyzes the literature provided by political science and related disciplines that focus on the legal, political and social challenges to governments during national security crises.

PSC 561. International Criminal Law. 4 Hours.

In this class students will address both substantive international criminal law (the crimes committed ? such as slavery, crimes against humanity, genocide) and its enforcement mechanisms (the institutions ? international criminal tribunals and courts, international treaty enforcement mechanisms). Students will also interrogate the legitimacy of international criminal sanctions and address the political ramifications of criminal sanctions across national borders.Course Information: Same as LES 563.

PSC 562. Practical Politics Seminar in Political Campaigns. 4 Hours.

Examines the history, techniques, and trends in modern political campaigns from the practitioner's perspective. Explores what works and why and the implications for those seeking elected public office and for the health of the political system.

PSC 563. Practical Politics Seminar in Lobbying. 4 Hours.

Course examines the techniques and trends in lobbying from the practitioner's perspective. Explores the implications of what works and why for the health of the political system and for the practitioner.

PSC 564. Practical Politics Seminar in Policy Formation, Analysis, and Presentation. 4 Hours.

Course examines policy-making perspectives, analysis techniques, and presentation strategies as they apply to policy initiatives. Uses policy initiative studies and simulations to develop practical politics perspectives. Explores the implications of what works and why for the health of the political system and for the practitioner.

PSC 565. Law, Policy, and Administration. 4 Hours.

This course provides a graduate level overview of the legal foundations of the environment in which public managers and policy makers operate. A case study approach is used to illustrate the interrelationship of public management, policymaking and law. Course Information: Same as PAD 565 and LES 565.

PSC 575. Effective Public Affairs Writing. 4 Hours.

Writing-intensive course examining a range of writing styles, structures and components used by public affairs practitioners and graduate students. Includes such topics as thesis statement literature review, fact sheet, policy memo and press release. Course Information: Same as LES 575 and PAD 575.

PSC 580. Special Topics. 4 Hours.

Intensive study of a research or theoretical problem in political science, political education, or practical politics. Subject matter and requirements for study and research are determined by the student and the supervising faculty member. Course Information: May be repeated if topics vary. Prerequisite: PSC 501 and one seminar (PSC 511-518), or permission of instructor.

PSC 590. Closure Exercise. 4 Hours.

Development and completion of a master's closure exercise in political studies. Three options are available: 1) comprehensive examination, 2) master's project in practical politics, and 3) master's thesis. NOTE: If the closure exercise is not completed by the end of the initial four-hour enrollment, students must register for PSC 591 for zero credit hours (one billable hour) in all subsequent semesters until the exercise is completed.

PSC 591. Closure Exercise Continuing Enrollment. 0 Hours.

Refer to NOTE in course description for PSC 590. Course Information: May be repeated.

PSC 599. Graduate Tutorial. 1-4 Hours.

Intended to supplement, not supplant, regular course offerings. Students interested in a tutorial must secure the consent of the faculty member concerned before registration and submit any required documentation to him or her. Course Information: May be repeated if topics vary.