Public Administration

Bachelor of Arts

www.uis.edu/publicadministration/ or www.uis.edu/dpa/

Email: mpa@uis.edu or dpa@uis.edu
Office Phone: (217) 206-6310
Office Location: PAC 420

Departmental Goals and Objectives

Public Administration is a field of study that prepares students to serve as managers in local, state, and federal governments and the nonprofit sector. This interdisciplinary field applies the theories and methods of the social sciences to solve governance and public service problems. Areas of study include the principles of public administration, management, organization theory, public policy, public budgeting, financial management, law, ethics, and social science research methods.

Department of Public Administration Mission:

To contribute to improvement in the public and nonprofit sectors by:

  • Preparing students for public service through quality Bachelor, Master, and Doctoral degrees and graduate certificates;
  • Developing, sharing, and applying knowledge

The UIS Bachelor of Arts in Public Administration degree program is designed to prepare students to advance the public interest and civic engagement. Students are prepared through the integration of theory and practice. The program seeks to capitalize on the University’s location in the state capitol and traditional focus on Public Affairs. The program features opportunities for practical learning through access to the state government and historical sites, faculty with experience in government, and internship experiences coordinated through the Internship and Prior Learning Program

Program outcomes:

By the time students graduate, they should be able to:

  • Demonstrate an understanding of the role of public administration in government
  • Demonstrate an understanding of the principles of management and administration of public service organizations
  • Demonstrate an understanding of the fundamentals of public policy
  • Demonstrate an understanding of the basic principles of organizational theory
  • Demonstrate an understanding of the importance of public service ethics
  • Demonstrate an understanding of the role and value of diversity
  • Apply critical thinking skills to public administration and policy problems
  • Employ research methods in the public administration context
  • Demonstrate an ability to work collaboratively
  • Demonstrate professional oral and written communication skills

The Bachelor's Degree

Departmental Goals and Objectives

The Bachelor of Arts in Public Administration (BAPA) prepares students to serve as managers in nonprofit organizations and local, state, and federal governments. This interdisciplinary field applies the theories and methods of the social sciences to solve problems or management, administration, and governance in the nonprofit and public sectors. Areas of study include the principles of management, public administration, organizational theory, public policy, public budgeting, financial management, law, ethics, and social science research methods. We prepare students through the integration of theory and practice to advance the public interest and civic engagement.

Degree requirements for the BAPA include 27-credit hours of core course work and 9-credit hours of elective coursework for a total of 36-credit hours in the major and 120 overall.

Our program benefits greatly from the University’s location in the state capital and its traditional Public Affairs focus. We provide opportunities for practical learning through access to Illinois state government and historical sites, faculty with experience in nonprofit management and government, and applied study experiences such as internships coordinated through the University’s Internship and Prior Learning Program.

ECO 201Introduction to Microeconomics3
MAT 121/LES 201Applied Statistics (Satisfies the applied math requirement)3
or MAT 122 Contemporary Statistics
PSC/LES 201Introduction to the American Political System3
PAD 301Introduction to Public Service Management3
PAD 302Leadership and Management of Public Organizations3
PAD 303Public Policy for Managers3
PAD 310Nonprofit Sector and Society3
PAD 470Research Methods and Management3
PAD 471Public Administration Senior Capstone3
Elective Coursework9
Choose 9-credit hours of electives from 300 or 400 level Public Administration (PAD) courses.
Total Hours36

Note: Students who believe that they have had a comparable course at a four-year university or community college may petition the department to waive the course requirements. Students may petition to count a maximum of four courses as transfer credit toward the major. Students are encouraged to take the foundation courses before taking other 400-level courses.

Internship Opportunities

It is highly recommended for students without professional experience to participate in an internship or other applied study experience. Public Administration applied study experiences are coordinated through the Internship and Prior Learning Program. Students can apply up to 6 hours of credit for up to two courses through IPL 300 Internship Applied Learning or IPL 301 Project Applied Learning. Students should consult with their Program Student Advisors to begin exploring this opportunity.

Advising

Students will be assigned an initial faculty advisor when they declare Public Administration as their major field of study. The course of study is planned jointly with the academic advisor. Students should consult with their advisors before registration and at times during the semester.

Grading Policy

The department has no grading policy different from that used by the UIS campus.

Writing Competence

Faculty may identify writing deficiencies during courses and refer students to the Learning Hub.

AAS/ BA in Public Administration transfer completion degree program

The AAS/BA in Public Administration completion option seeks to offer students with Associate of Applied Science degrees in career and technical fields the opportunity to attain a baccalaureate degree that will enable them to capitalize on their specialized field while preparing them for management and supervisory positions in public service and nonprofit organizations. The program employs the reverse funnel stackable credential approach in which AAS degree holders complete their general education requirements after transfer to the baccalaureate granting institution. Typically, a student who has earned an AAS degree has earned 15 hours of general education credit and will then complete their remaining general education courses at UIS. Upon transfer into the Public Administration program, the student with a 60+ semester hour AAS degree from an accredited institution would need to complete at least 60 hours at UIS for the BA in Public Administration. Of these 60, the remaining general education credits needed to complete their general education requirements would include nine credits (ECO 201MAT 121 (or MAT 122), and PSC 201 (or LES 201)) that would also satisfy part of the Public Administration program core. Thus, after transfer, most AAS degree holders would complete 60 hours at UIS, 27 of which would typically be general education hours with nine overlapping in the public administration core, leaving 27 more public administration courses and six electives to complete the degree. ECCE hours also need to be included in this total (10 more hours).

Child Advocacy Studies Minor

The CAST (Child Advocacy Studies) minor was created as a collaborative approach to training and educating front line professionals and the next generation of child welfare practitioners. The core UIS CAST courses are certified by the ZERO Abuse Project and UIS Cast students are eligible for a certificate as proof of their knowledge, skills and abilities in child maltreatment prevention and intervention.  Upon completion for the 15-hour minor, students are eligible to receive credit for both the minor at UIS as well as the certificate awarded externally. Students may complete the CAST minor on-campus or fully online.

Required Courses
PAD 481Perspectives on Child Maltreatment and Advocacy3
PAD 482Global Child Advocacy Studies3
OR
Childhood Trauma: Risk and Resiliency
PAD 483The System's Response to Child Maltreatment3
PAD 486Child Advocacy Studies Capstone3
One of the following3
ECCE: Internship Applied Learning
ECCE: Project Applied Learning
or and PAD 300 or PAD 400 Elective
Total Hours15

Online Degree:

The online degree allows students to participate in dynamic, diverse, and interactive online learning communities and to complete their degrees via the Internet. The online format enables them to complete course work using the latest networked information technologies for increased access to educational resources, advisors, and materials with no on-campus visits required. The online degree follows the same curriculum as the on-campus degree.

Integrated BPA/MPA in Public Administration

This curriculum is designed to reduce time to completion of a master's degree for undergraduates who wish to prepare for a public administration career. It is an integrated program that makes it possible for a student majoring in public administration to complete course work applied to the master's degree, thus reducing their time to completion.

For students in the Integrated BPA/MPA program, all MPA program prerequisites will have been met as a part of meeting the requirements of the BPA program, and PAD 501 will be waived given that the students will already have experienced an introduction to the profession through the acquisition of the BPA. BPA students can also take up to six hours of 400 level elective credit that will be applied to the MPA. Thus, the integrated BPA/MPA student would complete at least 24 post-baccalaureate hours depending on how many 400 level electives are taken, including the following:

PAD 502Organization Dynamics3
PAD 503Analytical Tools3
PAD 504Budget And Finance3
PAD 505Human Resource Management3
PAD 506Public Policy for Managers3
PAD 507Information for Decision Making3
PAD 571Capstone Seminar3
Electives (up to four hours can be internship) 112
Degree Program Program Type Dept Application Materials and Admission Criteria Prerequisite Course Requirements Department ADM Review Dept Conditional Admits Dept Appeal Process
Public Administration BA On campus and online *No additional admission requirements beyond the general UIS criteria

N/A N/A N/A N/A
Integrated BPA/MPA On campus *Students must first be admitted to the BPA

*Additional qualifications for admission to the integrated program include:
-Minimum 3.0 GPA for all previous college course work
*Completion of a basic course in American government or PSC 201, introductory microeconomics or ECO 201, and either MAT 121 or MAT 122 or equivalent course approved by the department N/A N/A N/A

Courses

PAD 201. Issues in American Public Administration. 3 Hours.

This course is intended to provide a survey of the American governmental system from the administrative rather than political perspective, focusing on some fundamental debates that have shaped American governance at the federal, state and local levels. It will explore the role of the public administrator in the context of contemporary social, political and economic trends.

PAD 301. Introduction to Public Service Management. 3 Hours.

This course will explore the role and competencies of the public service and nonprofit administrator in the context of contemporary social, political and economic issues. Course Information: Prerequisites: Introductory Course in U.S. Government.

PAD 302. Leadership and Management of Public Organizations. 3 Hours.

This course is an introduction to the concepts and skills of leadership, human resource development and organizational theory all focused around the idea of how to lead a public service organization.

PAD 303. Public Policy for Managers. 3 Hours.

This course is an introduction to the concepts and skills required for strategic planning, implementation and evaluation of public policy. The course emphasizes the role of public service organizations in public policy processes.

PAD 310. Nonprofit Sector and Society. 3 Hours.

This course offers an overview of the role that the nonprofit sector provides in delivering goods and services in society. The course emphasizes the role that managers and organizations play in a complex world.

PAD 399. Tutorial in Public Administration. 1-3 Hours.

Students interested in a tutorial must secure the consent of the faculty member concerned before registration and submit any required documentation to him or her. Course Information: May be repeated to a maximum of 12 credit hours if topics vary. Requires instructor approval.

PAD 411. Contemporary Issues in Nonprofit Management. 3 Hours.

This course offers an overview of contemporary issues in nonprofit management and examines these issues using the theories and practices of nonprofit management. The course emphasizes the role of the manager in addressing challenges in this field.

PAD 431. Operations Research Methods. 4 Hours.

Quantitative methods necessary for analysis, modeling, and decision making. Topics include linear programming, transportation model, network models, programming, decision theory, games theory, PERT-CPM, inventory models, and queuing theory. Additional topics may be chosen from integer linear programming, system simulation, and nonlinear programming. Course Information: Same as MAT 444. Prerequisite: MAT 332 with grade of C or better.

PAD 432. State and Local Community Development. 3 Hours.

This course offers an introduction to state and local development. The course emphasizes the role of public administration and nonprofit professionals in this policy area. The course covers theories related to community development as well as policies and practices for improving quality of life in communities.

PAD 441. Contemporary Issues in Policy. 3 Hours.

This course offers an overview of contemporary public policy issues and examines these issues using the techniques of public policy analysis. The course emphasizes the role of the manager and public service organizations within these policy arenas.

PAD 452. Employment Discrimination Law. 3,4 Hours.

Development and implementation of anti-discrimination laws in employment, including hiring, firing, promotion, terms and conditions, benefits and pay, with respect to race, gender, disability, religion, and national origin, among others. Course Information: Same as LES 449 and WGS 449.

PAD 470. Research Methods and Management. 3 Hours.

This course provides students with an introduction to research methods which are important for public and nonprofit administrators and prepares students to frame and organize their research project in the senior capstone course.

PAD 471. Public Administration Senior Capstone. 3 Hours.

The senior capstone course is a summative course which allows students to integrate their coursework in public and nonprofit administration by bringing it to bear on an issue or problem in the practice of administration. The course will include written research/analytic projects. Course Information: Prerequisites: PAD 470.

PAD 475. Government Regulations and Administrative Law. 4 Hours.

Administrative law and administrative agencies, the so called 4th branch of government, have a profound effect on everyone's daily lives. They dictate who, what, where, why and how things are done. This course will explore their impact on Federal and state governments and the American people. Course Information: Same as LES 475.

PAD 481. Perspectives on Child Maltreatment and Advocacy. 3,4 Hours.

Covers the history, comparative perspectives, legal framework, responses to child maltreatment, the skills necessary to do the work, and other pertinent issues pertaining to child maltreatment and child advocacy. The approach of the course will be from a variety of diverse, professional perspectives. The course is designed for students majoring in public administration, criminal justice, psychology, social work, sociology, legal studies or other areas where knowledge of child maltreatment and advocating for children might be necessary or beneficial. Course Information: Same as CCJ 481, PSY 481, SWK 481, and TEP 481.

PAD 482. Global Child Advocacy Studies. 3,4 Hours.

The purpose of this course is to prepare students to recognize child advocacy issues around the world. The course is designed for students majoring in public administration, criminal justice, education, social work, nursing, psychology, legal studies, or other areas where knowledge of child maltreatment and advocating for children will be necessary. Multidisciplinary approaches to advocacy in different countries throughout the world will be presented and discussed. Course Information: Same as TEP 482.

PAD 483. The System's Response to Child Maltreatment. 3,4 Hours.

This course focuses on the responses of professionals to allegations of child maltreatment. The purpose of this course is to expand the student's knowledge and skills in the prevention, identification, investigation and criminal justice response to child maltreatment. The course is designed for students who are likely to pursue a profession in which they will be a mandated reporter and knowledge of child maltreatment and advocacy is critical. Course Information: Same as TEP 483.

PAD 484. Childhood Trauma: Risk and Resiliency. 3,4 Hours.

This course examines the psychological effects of trauma on children. Specifically, the impact of physical, emotional, and sexual abuse and neglect, war, terrorism, and natural disasters are explored. The concepts of resilience and post traumatic growth are discussed to discover why many affected children successfully traverse their trauma. Additionally, interventions and treatment for trauma in childhood are considered. Course Information: Prerequisites: PSY 201, 302, and 321 or 322. Same as PSY 484.

PAD 485. Administrative Law and Management. 3 Hours.

This course explores the structure and function of modern administrative agencies, the promulgation of regulations and the impact of decisions by administrative law judges. Areas of focus include: the rights of public sector employees, judicial review of agency actions, leveraging agency resources, statutory interpretation and due process requirements relative to agency decisions.

PAD 486. Child Advocacy Studies Capstone. 3 Hours.

The Child Advocacy Studies Capstone course is a summative course which allows students to integrate their coursework in the minor by bringing it to bear on an issue or problem in the field of Child Advocacy. The course will include written research/analytic projects. Course Information: Prerequisites: PAD 481 and PAD 483.

PAD 490. Topics in Public Administration. 3 Hours.

Selected topics announced when offered. Course information: May be repeated if topics vary.

PAD 499. Tutorial in Public Administration. 1-4 Hours.

Students interested in a tutorial must secure the consent of the faculty member concerned before registration and submit any required documentation to him or her. Course Information: May be repeated to a maximum of 10 credit hours if topics vary. Requires Instructor Approval.

PAD 501. Introduction to the Profession. 3 Hours.

Analyzes fundamental issues of professionalization facing M.P.A. practitioners in the occupational field. Course Information: Prerequisite: Introductory course in U.S. Government.

PAD 502. Organization Dynamics. 3 Hours.

Structure and function of public organizations as socio-technical systems and of related individual, group, and leadership processes. Topics include leadership, decision making, group dynamics, motivation, job satisfaction, authority, power, organizational change, communication, conflict, and organization structure and design.

PAD 503. Analytical Tools. 3 Hours.

Analytical tool required by public and nonprofit administrators. Topics include research design, descriptive statistics, probability and inferential statistics.

PAD 504. Budget And Finance. 3 Hours.

Budgetary decision making in governmental units. Political, economic, legal, and administrative aspects of budgeting are examined. Analysis of budget practices, such as the integration of budgeting with strategic planning and performance management. Course Information: Prerequisite: Lower-division courses in American government, computer spreadsheet applications, and microeconomics, or equivalents.

PAD 505. Human Resource Management. 3 Hours.

Personnel administration in the public sector and administrative problems raised by this important management responsibility. Evaluation of administrative, political, and legal factors affecting management's ability to deal with organization/employee relationships.

PAD 506. Public Policy for Managers. 3 Hours.

Functions of policy analysis in political and administrative decision making, including basis for judgment, impact on bargaining, analytical process and other issues in design and implementation of policy for managers.

PAD 507. Information for Decision Making. 3 Hours.

This course explores information technology and the process of taking data to information and knowledge for management and decision making in the public and nonprofit sectors. The ability to use technology in data analysis and management will be developed.

PAD 508. Economics and Public Policy. 3 Hours.

This course provides an introduction to public economics with application to policy analysis. The course covers microeconomic principles with applications and techniques relevant to public policy. Additionally, topics such as market failures, regulation, taxation, subsidization, and creation of new markets are covered in order to highlight the pressing problems facing central cities and urban areas in the United States.

PAD 509. Workplace Democracy. 3 Hours.

Origins and recent developments in theory and practices of workplace democracy, both in the United States and in other countries. Exploration of such concepts as worker control, work self-management, and economic democracy.

PAD 510. Current and Emerging Public Policies. 4 Hours.

This course will examine U.S. public policies with an emphasis on new and emerging policies. Course Information: Same as PSC 510.

PAD 511. Collective Bargaining. 3 Hours.

Development and nature of employee organizations, collective bargaining, and public policies on labor relations in the public sector -- federal, state, and local. Analysis of contemporary bargaining relations, procedures, problems, and consequences.

PAD 521. International Poverty, Inequality, and Development. 3 Hours.

This seminar course analyzes the nature and extent of poverty and inequality in the developing world and the influence of various macro-and micro-level factors. The course is intended to provide a broad introduction to poverty and inequality in the developing world, while allowing students to study in greater depth a particular developing country of their choosing.

PAD 522. U.S. Social Policy. 3 Hours.

This seminar course analyzes the nature and extent of poverty in the United States, its causes and consequences, and government policies and programs to reduce poverty and assist the poor. The course is intended to provide a broad introduction to poverty and antipoverty policies in the United States, while allowing students to study in greater depth particular topics of their choosing.

PAD 524. Capital Budgeting. 3 Hours.

Overview of how public sector entities finance long-term projects. Includes measurement of governmental debt capacity by tracking trends in major fiscal indicators, such as per capita debt and debt as a percent of general revenue. Other topics include the role of rating agencies in capital expenditure decisions determining yields to maturity and internal rates of return, cost benefit analysis, and recent innovations in bond financing. Course Information: Prerequisite: PAD 504 or permission of instructor.

PAD 525. Informatics for Public Policy. 3 Hours.

This course provides an introduction to policy informatics. Policy informatics are the computation and communication technologies used to inform, understand, and solve complex public policy problems. This course equips students with the conceptual building blocks to address policy problems and introduces fundamental tools and technologies necessary to transform data into knowledge.

PAD 526. Advanced Analytical Tools: Forecasting, Time Series Analysis, and Predictive Analytics. 3 Hours.

This course expands upon core knowledge of statistical methods to include elements of forecasting, time series analysis, and predictive modeling. These are essential tools in the toolkit of a public policy analyst.

PAD 531. Public Policy Analysis. 3 Hours.

Functions of policy analysis in political decision making, including bases for judgment, impact on bargaining, analytical limitations, and other issues in design and implementation of policy studies.

PAD 532. Case Analysis. 3 Hours.

Course provides methods for analyzing complicated public policy situations. Students interact with local and state policy leaders in examining contemporary public policy debates affecting Illinois, which may include but are not limited to: affirmative action, immigration, economic development, or capital punishment.

PAD 533. Program Evaluation. 3 Hours.

Goals, methods, and techniques of program evaluation in public agencies and nonprofit organizations and the implications of program evaluation findings for legislative and executive program planning and implementation. Each student is required to design an evaluation of an organizational program.

PAD 534. Program Implementation. 3 Hours.

Advanced graduate seminar focusing on ways state, local, and national administrative units carry out governmental policies/programs. Provides particular attention to the processes through which policy intent is translated into program performance and service delivery. Examines barriers to effective implementation of policy initiatives. Also examines ways public administrators and managers can be more effective in the implementation of public policy decisions.

PAD 535. Public Administration Diversity. 3 Hours.

Diversity in public service, including value tensions, managing representative bureaucracy and service delivery, public and professional education, legal history and public policy.

PAD 536. Intergovernmental Relations. 3 Hours.

This course examines the division of responsibilities and the interrelationships among the federal, state, and local governments in the United States. Topics to be addressed include the legal origins and historical evolution of American federalism, theoretical and political perspectives, fiscal federalism, and ways to manage intergovernmental relations.

PAD 538. Public Service Ethics and Leadership. 3 Hours.

This course examines the leading ethical issues encountered by public service professionals and reviews several different sources that one might look to for guidance. Rather than concentrating on wrongdoing, this class will focus on the legitimate use of administrative discretion to establish the concept of public value leadership.

PAD 541. Nonprofit Sector: Human Resources. 3 Hours.

Context and dynamics, strategic planning, management functions, volunteers, development, and challenges in nonprofit sector human resources.

PAD 542. Nonprofit Sector & Society. 3 Hours.

This course considers the integral role that the nonprofit sector provides in delivering essential services. Topics include the challenges that both managers and organizations face in a dynamic resource environment.

PAD 543. Marketing for Public and Nonprofit Organizations. 3 Hours.

Applies marketing concepts and methodologies to planning and delivery of public and nonprofit services. Requirements include preparation and presentation of a marketing plan for a public or nonprofit organization.

PAD 544. Fund Raising for Public and Nonprofit Organizations. 3 Hours.

Fund-raising and resource development for public and nonprofit organizations, including proposal/grant research and writing, grants management, annual and capital campaign development, special events, planned giving, and fund-raising software.

PAD 545. Public Financial Management. 3 Hours.

This course addresses financial management concepts, policies, and analytical techniques that are relevant to governmental and nonprofit organizations. Topics to be addressed include revenues and other financing sources, financial reporting and analysis, cost analyses, cash management, internal controls, and performance management and reporting.

PAD 552. Strategic Planning and Management. 3 Hours.

Concepts, methods, processes, and applications of strategic planning and management for public and nonprofit organizations. Topics may include: futures thinking, strategy, planning in uncertain environments, leadership, impact of the Government Performance and Results Act, strategy implementation, community governance, and linkages among planning, budgeting, performance, and results-based management.

PAD 553. Community Planning and Policy. 3 Hours.

The purpose of this course is to provide an introduction to the professional practice of community planning and the basic theoretical concepts on which the discipline of professional planning is based. Students will identify and analyze the critical factors for achieving community quality of life, the relevant public policy issues, decision making processes, and resources that affect planning across a broad spectrum of community types, including urban-suburban-exurban-rural, and the complexities of zoning, economic and community development.

PAD 554. Community Planning Tools. 3 Hours.

This course is designed to prepare students to successfully carry out technical portions of the planning process. The course will focus on basic design concepts and applications of GIS; regional economic and demographic analysis; decision making tools; and citizen participation tools.

PAD 556. Community Economic Development. 3 Hours.

This course is designed to provide a general understanding of the typologies, processes, and theoretical underpinnings of Community Economic Development, Further, this course attempts to bridge the gap between theory and practice - seeking to convey to the student various tactics that can be applied in real world situations. The course provides an opportunity to learn how communities are categorized as well as showing some of the broad strategies utilized in contemporary social policy.

PAD 561. Graduate Public Service Internship Seminar in Organization Environment in the Public Service. 1 Hour.

Provides exposure to the organizational-bureaucratic environment within the context of the internship experience. Course Information: Restricted to GPSI students.

PAD 568. Labor Arbitration and Dispute Resolution. 3 Hours.

Philosophy and practice of labor arbitration in the unionized private and public sectors. Students develop skills in arbitration practices, decision making, negotiation, rules and procedures, selection of arbitrators, and presentation of cases in a simulated arbitration proceeding. Students also learn alternative methods of settling disputes, including conciliation and mediation, and understanding processes of when and how to use alternative techniques. Course Information: Same as LES 568. Restricted to graduate students and to senior undergraduates with permission from Department of Public Administration.

PAD 571. Capstone Seminar. 3 Hours.

Integrates and applies skills and values from other coursework in the MPA curriculum. Integrates academic research with issues faced by practicing professionals. Major paper and oral presentation required. Course meets program and campus requirements for master's degree closure. NOTE: If the course requirements are not completed during the four-hour enrollment, students must register for PAD 572 for zero credit hours (one billable hour) in all subsequent semesters until the requirements are completed. Course Information: Prerequisite: Open only to fully admitted MPA majors who have completed at least four of the five core courses prior to registration.

PAD 572. Capstone Seminar Continuing Enrollment. 0 Hours.

Refer to NOTE in course description for PAD 571 Course Information: May be repeated.

PAD 573. Capstone in Public Policy. 3 Hours.

Based on theories and literature from the field of public policy, this course integrates academic research with issues faced by practicing professionals. A major project and formal oral presentation are conducted as closure exercises meeting campus requirements for a master's degree.

PAD 574. Thesis Continuing Enrollment. 0 Hours.

This course is offered to those students who enrolled in PAD 573 as their closure option and were unable to complete that option. Students must register for PAD 574 for zero credit hours (one billable hour) in all subsequent fall and spring semesters until the closure option is completed. Course Information: May be repeated.

PAD 580. Public Administration Internship Seminar. 3,4 Hours.

Analysis of internship experience. Course Information: Restricted to graduate PAD and GPSI students. Three credit hour option generally reserved for GPSI students.

PAD 581. Fundamentals of Public Procurement. 3 Hours.

An introductory course in the field of public procurement. The course addresses theory and practice within international, federal, state and local procurement. Additionally, the course aims to familiarize students with key terminology in public procurement.

PAD 582. Public Procurement Process, Ethics and Law. 3 Hours.

An introductory course in the legal and ethical frameworks of public procurement processes. The course focuses on the impact of decisions made with respect to principles of good governance. These decisions are placed in the context of ethical principles and laws of public procurement. Restricted to Graduate students.

PAD 583. Contract Formulation and Administration. 3 Hours.

This course introduces the practices and principles of formulation and administration of public contracts. The focus of the course is on the best practices associated with developing, drafting, sourcing and closing out of contracts in the public procurement process. Restricted to Graduate students.

PAD 584. Best Value Analysis and Negotiation. 3 Hours.

This course introduces the tools and practices of finding the best value in public sector contracting. The course discusses the theoretical and operational frameworks of negotiation. A management approach places the course in the context of the public procurement process. Restricted to Graduate students only.

PAD 585. Project Management in Public Procurement. 3 Hours.

This course provides the theoretical and conceptual frameworks for project management in the context of the public procurement process. The course focuses on planning, personnel management, delegation of responsibility, scope of work and the processes of performance management. Restricted to Graduate students only.

PAD 589. The Public and Environmental Planning. 4 Hours.

Public involvement is a part of many municipal, state, and federal decision making processes involving the environment. This class examines the history of public involvement in environmental decision making, introduces theories of public involvement, and prepares students to apply best practices for public involvement in environmental planning. Course Information: Same as ENS 589.

PAD 590. Topics in Public Administration. 3,4 Hours.

Selected topics announced when offered. Course Information: May be repeated if topics vary.

PAD 599. Tutorial in Public Administration. 1-12 Hours.

Intended to supplement, not supplant, regular course offerings. Students interested in a tutorial must secure the consent of the faculty member concerned before registration and submit any required documentation to him or her. Internship Seminars. Course Information: May be repeated to a maximum of 12 hours if topics vary.

PAD 651. Leading Social Sector Change and Innovation. 4 Hours.

Students will examine the role and potential for innovation in the social sectors, both in the design and execution of programs. This will include an introduction to a number of leadership strategies and tools that might aid in the acceleration of change. Students are also introduced to the standards of applied inquiry and scholarly discourse at the doctoral level.

PAD 652. Public Management Seminar: Connecting Practice and Theory. 4 Hours.

Students will learn the major approaches to public management, especially an understanding of the practitioner's role in both perennial and cutting edge problems. The instructor will draw connections between concepts covered in PAD 651 with emphasis on understanding and addressing the most pressing governance needs of the 21st century.

PAD 653. Public Policy Seminar. 4 Hours.

Students will learn the stages of the policy process, public policy paradigms, current research directions, and major subfields. Emphasis is placed on developing appreciation for the connections between practitioner experience and scholarly inquiry.

PAD 654. Research Design. 4 Hours.

Students will learn the essential elements of research design. Students will learn how to structure research projects using the scientific method for both academic and practical investigation. The course will cover qualitative, quantitative, evaluation, experimental, and quasi-experimental research approaches. Course Information: Prerequisite: PAD 651.

PAD 655. Qualitative Research Methods. 4 Hours.

Introduces students to doctoral level qualitative analysis. Students learn research ethics in qualitative inquiry and a variety of methods, including single and comparative case studies, ethnography, process tracing, interviewing, content and discourse analysis, and field experiments. Students are asked to develop a research design using qualitative methodology, which they can tailor towards their dissertation.

PAD 656. Quantitative Research Methods. 4 Hours.

Introduces students to doctoral level quantitative analysis. Students will learn several common analysis and estimation techniques, quantitative inference, and how to critically read original quantitative research.

PAD 659. Dissertation Proposal Seminar. 4 Hours.

A course for doctoral students that stresses the development of a dissertation proposal. The course examines subject matter relating to questions, literature reviews and methodology for the purpose of completing a prepared proposal.

PAD 689. Qualifying Exam. 0 Hours.

The qualifying exam is designed to test students over the content of the core coursework.

PAD 690. Dissertation. 1-12 Hours.

Research and writing of the doctoral dissertation. PAD 690 is repeated until the dissertation is completed, defended, and approved by the dissertation committee. A minimum of 12 hours is required. If the thesis is not completed by the time the 12 required hours are accrued, students must continue to register for PAD 691 for one billable hour in all subsequent semesters until the dissertation is completed, defended, and accepted. Course Information: Credit/No Credit grading only. Prerequisite: Satisfactory completion of qualifying examination and all other coursework required for the DPA degree.

PAD 691. Dissertation Continuing Enrollment. 0 Hours.

Refer to NOTE in course description for PAD 690. Course Information: May be repeated.

PAD 699. Independent Study/Tutorial. 1-8 Hours.

Intended to supplement, not supplant, regular course offerings. Students interested in a tutorial must secure the consent of the faculty member concerned before registration and submit any required documentation to him or her. Course Information: May be repeated if topics vary.