Sociology/Anthropology

Bachelor of Arts
Undergraduate Minor

Anthropology
Sociology

www.uis.edu/sociologyanthropology/
Email: soa@uis.edu
Office Phone: (217) 206-6962
Office Location: UHB 3038

Departmental Goals and Objectives

Sociologists and anthropologists are interested in how people live together in this world--in our neighborhoods, across the country, and around the globe. We study people now and in the past, how they relate to each other, and all that they think, do, and make--food, music, families, nations, tools, houses, institutions... We are particularly interested in the way race, class, gender, sexuality, and other elements of identity affect peoples' experiences and opportunities, and what can be done to promote greater social justice.

The interdisciplinary BA in Sociology/Anthropology (SOA) allows students to cultivate skills and tools from both disciplines, preparing them for a broad range of careers and future studies. Core courses in the SOA major cover both disciplines, and students are free to specialize in either anthropology or sociology through electives or through a minor.

The Bachelor's Degree

Advising

Campus policy requires each student to have an academic advisor. Students declaring the SOA major are assigned an initial faculty advisor by the department. Before beginning the major, students are expected to consult with their academic advisors concerning department requirements and individual goals. Department faculty members assist students in designing individualized academic programs to meet their interests and career goals.

Grading Policy

The Sociology/Anthropology program does not have a grading policy that differs from that of the campus policy.

Communication Skills and Assessment

The department highly values critical thinking and reading skills, oral and written communication, and disciplinary knowledge. These are developed and assessed throughout the curriculum, and at the departmental level through capstone work in SOA 410 Senior Seminar.

Degree Requirements

Through core courses, students become familiar with the basic approaches and insights of both sociology and anthropology. Core courses are offered day or night in alternate years, to accommodate students' work and family schedules. Students are free to take electives in anthropology and/or sociology as desired, according to interest. All students become familiar with the basic theoretical issues surrounding the study of the social world and acquire the skills necessary to interpret research and carry out small-scale projects. 

To earn a BA in Sociology/Anthropology, students must complete a minimum of 30 credit hours, which includes five core courses, one course in the Diversity/Inequalities category, and a minimum of two elective courses. The department does allow courses to count toward both ECCE and SOA major/minor requirements. Students are expected to meet with an SOA academic advisor before beginning the major, and periodically throughout the program to make sure they are working effectively toward their goals.

Core Courses
SOA 302Understanding Cultures4
SOA 304Human Evolution: Biological and Cultural4
SOA 405Sociocultural Theories4
SOA 410Senior Seminar3
SOA 411Social Research Methods4
Diversity/Inequalities Requirement
Select one of the following:3-4
ECCE: Introduction to Race & Ethnicity in the U.S.
ECCE: Working USA and the 99%
ECCE: Introduction to Women and Gender Studies
ECCE: Culture and Education
ECCE: Global Social Stratification
Electives
Students are required to take at least two elective courses in SOA. At least one course must be at the 400-level.7-8
Total29-31

Degree Plan*

*Listed below is a SUGGESTED Degree Plan.  For OFFICIAL program information, please refer to the catalog content above and consult your academic advisor.

Year 1
Fall Hours
ENG 1011Rhetoric and College Writing3
Freshman Seminar13
COM 1121Oral Communication3
Science with lab (either life or physical science) 14
 Hours13
Spring  
ENG 1021College Writing and Civic Engagement3
Comparative Societies (Humanities)13
Humanities13
Social/Behavioral Science course13
MAT 111 (Math Skills)1Quantitative Reasoning3
 Hours15
Year 2
Fall  
Science without lab (life or physical science)13
Social/Behavioral Science course13
Visual/ Creative/Performing Arts Humanities113
SOA 101 or 2211Introduction to Sociology3
SOA 302 (OR SOA elective)3Understanding Cultures4
 Hours16
Spring  
Applied Math13
SOA 304 (OR SOA elective)3Human Evolution: Biological and Cultural4
Elective or minor course44
Elective or minor course44
 Hours15
Year 3
Fall  
ECCE Global Issues23
SOA Diversity/Inequalities Elective34
SOA 302 (OR SOA elective)3Understanding Cultures4
Elective or minor course44
 Hours15
Spring  
SOA 304 (OR SOA elective)3Human Evolution: Biological and Cultural4
SOA 4113Social Research Methods4
Elective or minor course44
Elective or minor course44
 Hours16
Year 4
Fall  
SOA 4053Sociocultural Theories4
Elective or minor course44
Elective or minor course44
ECCE U.S. Communities23
 Hours15
Spring  
SOA 4103Senior Seminar3
ECCE IPL23
Elective or minor course44
Elective or minor course44
UNI 3012ECCE: Speakers Series1
 Hours15
 Total Hours: 120
1

This course fulfills General Education requirements- 48 Hours

2

Students must complete ECCEs in at least two of the three ECCE categories - U.S. Communities, Global Awareness, Engagement - per major requirements in addition to Speakers Series - 10 Hours

3

Soc/Ant Major course work- 31 Hours

4

Electives- minimum 12 hours that can be selected to earn a minor and can be outside of major.

Anthropology Minor

To earn a minor in Anthropology, students must complete a minimum of 15 credit hours, including two core courses and at least two elective courses. Students should consult with an academic advisor to identify electives appropriate to the minor. Classes used to complete the minor cannot also be used to satisfy degree requirements in the student’s major, but they may indeed count toward ECCE requirements.

Core Courses
SOA 302Understanding Cultures4
SOA 304Human Evolution: Biological and Cultural4
Elective Courses
Select at least two elective courses in SOA, one of which must be chosen from the list below. At least one elective must be at the 300- or 400-level.7-8
World Cultures
Peoples of the Past
Latin American Expressions
Women and Gender in Mexico and the US
Introduction To Archaeology
ECCE: Introduction to Race & Ethnicity in the U.S.
Music, Technology, and Culture
ECCE: Introduction to Women and Gender Studies
ECCE:Perspectives on Poverty
ECCE: Latina/o USA
Jazz in American Culture
ECCE: Women Across Cultures
Prehistoric America
ECCE: Nature, History, and Human Action
Feminist Theories
ECCE: American Musics
ECCE:Teen Talk-Culture and Adolesence
ECCE: Culture, Health, and Power
Mexican Migration to the U. S.
ECCE: Women of Color and Minority Women
European Prehistory
Archaeological Field Course/Germany
Topics in Sociology/Anthropology
North American Indians: Culture and Ecology
Hunters And Gatherers
Feminist Theories II
Total Hours15-16

Sociology Minor

To earn a minor in Sociology, students must complete a minimum of 15 credit hours, including two core courses and at least two elective courses. Students should consult with an academic advisor to identify electives appropriate to the minor. Classes used to complete the minor cannot also be used to satisfy degree requirements in the student’s major, but they may indeed count toward ECCE requirements.

Core Courses
SOA 101Introduction to Sociology3
or SOA 221 Social Problems
SOA 405Sociocultural Theories4
or SOA 411 Social Research Methods
Elective Courses
Select at least two elective courses in SOA, one of which must be chosen from the list below. At least one elective must be at the 300- or 400-level.7-8
Social Problems
American Society
ECCE: Introduction to Race & Ethnicity in the U.S.
Juvenile Delinquency
ECCE: Introduction to Women and Gender Studies
ECCE:Perspectives on Poverty
ECCE: Gay and Lesbian Studies
ECCE: Latina/o USA
ECCE: Sex, Gender, and Popular Culture
Sociocultural Theories
Feminist Theories
Social Research Methods
Criminological Theory
ECCE: Environmental Sociology
Law and Inequality
Sociology of Organizations
ECCE: Culture and Education
ECCE: Immigrants, Public Opinion, and Public Policy
ECCE: Global Social Stratification
Mexican Migration to the U. S.
ECCE: Women of Color and Minority Women
Sociology of Gender
Family Law
ECCE: Masculinities
Social Psychology: Sociological Perspectives
Religion, Society, and the Individual
Topics in Sociology/Anthropology
Feminist Theories II
Sociology of Death, Dying, and Bereavement
Total Hours14-15
Degree Program Program Type Dept Application Materials and Admission Criteria Prerequisite Course Requirements Department ADM Review Dept Conditional Admits Dept Appeal Process
Sociology/Anthropology BAOn campusNo additional requirements beyond the general UIS criteriaN/AN/AN/AN/A

Courses

SOA 101. Introduction to Sociology. 3 Hours.

An introductory "survey" course in sociology that will introduce basic theories and concepts relevant in all sociological work. Students are given the opportunity, later in the semester, to pursue more detailed research and information in their own personal interests within the discipline. Course Information: This course fulfills a general education requirement at UIS in the area of Social and Behavioral Sciences. (IAI Code S7 900).

SOA 102. World Cultures. 3 Hours.

Explores diversity around the globe and over time. We discuss types of social organization and their relations to the environment, economics, ideologies, and social inequality, as well as the impact of colonization and globalization. Through anthropological approaches we will learn about other cultures and ourselves. Course Information: This course fulfills a general education requirement at UIS in the area of Comparative Societies Social Sciences (IAI Code: S1 901N).

SOA 103. Introduction to Anthropology. 3 Hours.

Introduction to the discipline of anthropology through a global exploration of homes as places where people work, negotiate identities, and construct gender and kinship. Survey of cultural, archaeological, biological and linguistic subfields with emphasis on combining these to achieve a holistic study of humanity past and present. Comparison of global case studies to explore relationships between households and their cultural and natural environments. Course Information: This course fulfills a general education requirement at UIS in the area of Social and Behavioral Sciences.

SOA 106. Peoples of the Past. 3 Hours.

This course combines historic and archaeological approaches to explore major social, political and cultural transformations in several different world regions, with particular attention to the rise of agriculture, cities, states, and writing systems. No prerequisites. Course Information: Same as HIS 106. This course fulfills a general education requirement at UIS in the area of Comparative Societies Social Sciences.

SOA 131. Latin American Expressions. 3 Hours.

Explores major themes in Latin American music, film, literature, and festivals with an emphasis on Brazil and Chile. The class will use these cultural elements to learn about history, culture, and politics with particular attention to social inequality and resistance. Course Information: This course fulfills a general education requirement at UIS in the area of Comparative Societies Social Sciences.

SOA 133. Women and Gender in Mexico and the US. 3 Hours.

Course examines the gendered lives of women and men in Mexico and the U.S. By comparing gender across cultures, students inquire into whether masculinity and femininity is universal or open to change. Stereotypes about Mexicans are challenged. Course Information: Same as WGS 133. Students enrolled in WGS 133 or SOA 133 cannot also enroll in WGS 301 or SOA 301 or SWK 382. This course fulfills a general education requirement at UIS in the area of Comparative Societies Social Sciences.

SOA 141. The American Dream. 3 Hours.

This course examines various perceptions of "The American Dream" via essays, works of fiction, and political theory focused on socio-economic systems and in particular, capitalism. The course involves a significant amount of reading and involves in-depth discussions regarding the ways in which the capitalist framework shapes the American value system. Course Information: This course fulfills a general education requirement at UIS in the area of Freshman Seminar and a general education requirement at UIS in the area of Social and Behavioral Sciences.

SOA 150. Topics in Comparative Society. 3 Hours.

Introduction to comparative study of women's roles and gender issues across cultures. Course Information: Same as WGS 150. This course fulfills a general education requirement at UIS in the area of Comparative Societies Social Sciences.

SOA 191. Musics of the World. 3 Hours.

This course is designed to introduce students to the diversities and commonalities of music cultures from around the world. Course Information: Same as MUS 191. This course fulfills a general education requirement at UIS in the area of Comparative Societies Humanities.

SOA 204. ECCE: Global Women. 4 Hours.

Women are actively changing the world and yet continue to face issues of gender stereotypes, undervalued work and unequal access. How have women in Somalia been active in the face of war? What does it mean for women to work the night shift in a call center in India? Course Information: Same as PSC 205 and WGS 204. This course fulfills an Engaged Citizenship Common Experience requirement at UIS in the area of Global Awareness.

SOA 205. Introduction To Archaeology. 3 Hours.

Introduction to archaeological study of past human cultures. Emphasis on archaeological method and theory, with consideration of the ethics of conservation and ownership of cultural heritage. Archaeological examples from early human societies to historic times. Course Information:This course fulfills a general education requirement at UIS in the area of Social and Behavioral Sciences.

SOA 221. Social Problems. 3 Hours.

Analysis of contemporary social problems such as those involving individuals and families, and specifically those relating to crime, inequality and power, poverty, human diversity, militarism, drug and alcohol abuse, mental illness, environment, and modernization. Course Information: This course fulfills a general education requirement at UIS in the area of Social and Behavioral Sciences.

SOA 222. American Society. 3 Hours.

This course will examine the culture and structure of American society from historical, comparative, and contemporary perspectives. Topics include American political culture, key institutions, industrialization, the welfare state, interlocking systems of inequality, and the constitution of American citizenship. Course Information: This course fulfills a general education requirement at UIS in the area of Social and Behavioral Sciences.

SOA 223. Sociology of the Family. 3 Hours.

This course is designed to help students discover how their individual family experiences relate to societal patterns of family life. Also, examining how laws and social policies have helped define what counts as a family, who is a family member, and what rights and responsibilities those members have. Course Information: This course fulfills a general education requirement at UIS in the area of Social and Behavioral Sciences.

SOA 231. ECCE: Introduction to Race & Ethnicity in the U.S.. 3 Hours.

Survey of the ways that U.S. society had been shaped by the interaction of diverse racial and ethnic groups and immigration. Examines race and ethnicity as culture and power in relation to African, Latina/o, Asian European, and indigenous Americans. Students explore the ways we are produced and positioned by racial and ethnic categories and ideas. Course Information: This course fulfills an Engaged Citizenship Common Experience requirement at UIS in the area of U.S. Communities.

SOA 232. Juvenile Delinquency. 3 Hours.

Theoretical explanations of juvenile delinquency, with critical view of their value in the field, followed by practical and analytical view of juvenile justice systems in operation. Course Information: Same as CCJ 231. This course fulfills a general education requirement at UIS in the area of Social and Behavioral Sciences.

SOA 235. ECCE: Working USA and the 99%. 3 Hours.

This course provides an overview of the world of work, the lives of employees, and the politics of class in the US. We look at economic, social, and political issues facing working people, and the ways that they come together across races and cultures to better their lives historically and today. Course Information: This course fulfills an Engaged Citizenship Common Experience requirement at UIS in the area of U.S. Communities.

SOA 281. Music, Technology, and Culture. 3 Hours.

Course develops music listening, analysis, and compositional skills and familiarizes students with music technology in a broad array of historical and geographical musical environments. Students create an original instrument, compose and perform a work for the new instrument and computer, and explain choices made during this creative process. Course Information: Same as MUS 281. This course fulfills a general education requirement at UIS in the area of Visual, Creative, and Performing Arts.

SOA 301. ECCE: Introduction to Women and Gender Studies. 4 Hours.

Introduction to basic concepts and terminology in Women and Gender Studies: history of women's movements; feminist theories and concepts; issues such as socialization, work, violence, sexuality, marriage, media representation. Course Information: Same as WGS 301 and SWK 382. Not intended for first year students. Students enrolled in WGS 301 or SOA 301 or SWK 382 cannot also enroll in WGS 133 or SOA 133. This course fulfills an Engaged Citizenship Common Experience requirement at UIS in the area of U.S. Communities.

SOA 302. Understanding Cultures. 4 Hours.

Cultural anthropological approach to learning about social organization and ideologies, with an emphasis on critiquing disciplinary concepts, power and social inequality, and social science research and writing skills. Designed for SOA majors. Course Information: This course fulfills a general education requirement at UIS in the area of Social and Behavioral Sciences.

SOA 304. Human Evolution: Biological and Cultural. 4 Hours.

Human biological and cultural evolution from the earliest human ancestors to the origins of agriculture and civilization. Emphasis on major factors that have shaped humanity: hominid evolution, origins of human societies, origins of agriculture, birth of cities, and development of the state. Course Information: This course fulfills a general education requirement at UIS in the area of Social and Behavioral Sciences.

SOA 305. ECCE: Women and Work in India and the US. 3 Hours.

Work is going global, drawing more women into paid work. This course is an adventure into the challenges of work and home for women in two countries: the ongoing occupational segregation of women, comparable worth, and fair treatment. How can women earn a living wage, recognition and have a life? Course Information: Same as WGS 305. This course fulfills an Engaged Citizenship Common Experience requirement at UIS in the area of Global Awareness.

SOA 312. ECCE:Perspectives on Poverty. 3 Hours.

A service-learning course in which students gain an understanding of major sociological and anthropological theories and methodologies related to poverty. Students will participate in at least 60 hours of community service during the course of the semester with a non-profit organization in Springfield. Course Information: Same as IPL 312. This course fulfills an Engaged Citizenship Common Experience requirement at UIS in the area of Engagement Experience.

SOA 319. ECCE: Music and Social Justice. 4 Hours.

This course provides a forum for students to engage with social justice issues through music. With a combined geographical and topical approach, students examine the role of music in various social justice movements and develop a vocabulary to discuss music as a medium for change in various cultural contexts. Course Information: Same as MUS 319. This course fulfills an Engaged Citizenship Common Experience requirement at UIS in the area of Global Awareness.

SOA 322. ECCE: Gay and Lesbian Studies. 4 Hours.

Interdisciplinary survey of topics, questions, issues, and approaches in the field of gay/lesbian/bisexual/trans/queer studies. Topics: the current sex/gender/sexuality system; historical and cross-culture variations of sexual minorities and gender-variant people; major theories on the origins of sexual minorities and gender variance; issues of discrimination and intersection oppressions; and current issues affecting LGBTQ communities such as families, adoption, marriage, religion, and media representation. Course Information: Same as WGS 322. Not recommended for first year students. This course fulfills an Engaged Citizenship Common Experience requirement at UIS in the area of U.S. Communities.

SOA 325. ECCE: Latina/o USA. 4 Hours.

Introduction to the study of Mexican, Puerto Rican, Cuban, Dominican, and Central/South American communities in the U.S. Main themes are immigration, identity, gender and racial constructions, labor, education, and activism. Other topics include demographic trends, political participation, and relations with origin communities in Latin America and the Caribbean. Course Information: Same as HIS 325, GBL 325, LIS 325, PSC 465. This course fulfills an Engaged Citizenship Common Experience requirement at UIS in the area of U.S. Communities.

SOA 331. ECCE:Introduction to the Barrio. 3 Hours.

This course looks at Latino neighborhoods as a place and as an image: as a place in reference to housing, employment and educational opportunities, as an image in terms of symbolic understandings supporting or undermining Latino participation in society.

SOA 333. ECCE: Sexual Orientation and Public Policy. 3 Hours.

Interdisciplinary examination of factual basis of majority ideas about sexual orientation, gender identity, or sexuality used to assign important legal rights and disabilities to lesbian, gay bisexual, transgender and queer communities. Explores political movements and issues involved in the struggle for civil rights for sexual minorities. Requires an open mind. Course Information: Same as LES 333, PSC 333, and WGS 333. This course fulfills an Engaged Citizenship Common Experience requirement at UIS in the area of U.S. Communities.

SOA 334. ECCE: Sexuality, Law, and Politics. 3 Hours.

This course examines the U.S. sexual minority community through the prism of politics and law. It explores the history and contemporary dynamics of the LGBT rights movement and investigates the ways in which dynamics in U.S. law politics have limited and advanced the movement. Course Information: Same as LES 334, PSC 334, and WGS 334. This course fulfills an Engaged Citizenship Common Experience requirement at UIS in the area of U.S. Communities.

SOA 335. Jazz in American Culture. 4 Hours.

Explores development of jazz as a popular art form, the influence of American culture (e.g., race, class, gender relations, religion and moralism, and the dominance of commercial values) on the shape of this art form, its performance and enjoyment, and the reciprocal influence of jazz on American culture. Course Information: Same as MUS 335. This course fulfills a general education requirement at UIS in the area of Social and Behavioral Sciences.

SOA 338. ECCE: Sex, Gender, and Popular Culture. 4 Hours.

Survey of sex, gender and sexuality in production, reception, and content of contemporary U.S. popular culture. Themes: definitions, approaches, and functions of pop culture; race, class, gender, and sexuality in production and reception of media; representation and stylization of the body; masculinity and media violence; strategies for resisting media messages. Course Information: Same as WGS 338. Previous WGS coursework recommended, but not required. This course fulfills an Engaged Citizenship Common Experience requirement at UIS in the area of U.S. Communities.

SOA 353. ECCE: Women Across Cultures. 4 Hours.

Addresses the complexity of "Third World" women's lives including development and structural adjustment, reproductive rights and other health issues, violence against women, and highly effective activism. Course Information: Same as WGS 353. This course fulfills an Engaged Citizenship Common Experience requirement at UIS in the area of Global Awareness.

SOA 356. ECCE: Coffee, Chocolate and Justice. 3 Hours.

Food has been a major trade item for millennia, connecting us around the corner and across vast distances. What we eat and drink is a political, economic, and just plain comforting, from our everyday socializing to global economics. Should we buy fair trade or eat locally grown food? What are the ways we use food to signal home, difference, or even escape? Course Information: Same as WGS 356. This course fulfills an Engaged Citizenship Common Experience requirement at UIS in the area of Global Awareness.

SOA 357. ECCE: LGBTQ and Allies Peer Education. 3 Hours.

Experiential learning course that seeks to combat homophobia, transphobia, and heterosexism by training students in peer-education skills focused on LGBTQ issues. Interdisciplinary course materials and topics focusing on interpersonal communication, group facilitation, multicultural/social justice, and queer theory. Students become peer educators that provide workshop activities throughout the year on campus. Course Information: Same as PSC 357 and WGS 357. This course fulfills an Engaged Citizenship Common Experience requirement at UIS in the area of Engagement Experience.

SOA 367. ECCE: Arts and Identity in Pacific Island Cultures. 4 Hours.

This course explores the concept of identity in Pacific/Oceania Island cultures as expressed through the arts. Students will engage with topics and issues including indigenous and colonial history and relationships; traditional music, dance, visual arts, and seamanship; diversity amongst island cultures; and contemporary Oceanic arts and artists within a global society. Course Information: Same as ART 367 and MUS 367. This course fulfills an Engaged Citizenship Common Experience requirement at UIS in the area of Global Awareness.

SOA 371. Prehistoric America. 4 Hours.

Covers the prehistoric cultures of North America from their arrival to the period of contact with European Americans. Includes both lecture and hands-on experience with artifacts from the collections of the Illinois State Museum. Course Information: Held off campus at the Illinois State Museum Research and Collections Center in Springfield.

SOA 372. ECCE: Nature, History, and Human Action. 4 Hours.

Interdisciplinary investigation of human-environment relationships from prehistory to present. Emphasis on building sense of place through study of local landscape history. Archaeological and ethnographic case studies illustrate ways in which human action has shaped the natural world and emphasize cultural diversity in attitudes toward nature and environmental problem solving. Course Information: This course fulfills an Engaged Citizenship Common Experience requirement at UIS in the area of Global Awareness.

SOA 381. ECCE: The Politics of Harry Potter. 3 Hours.

Does the world of Harry Potter give us clues to analyzing discrimination, privilege and empowerment in the United States? In this course, we will use Rowling's Harry Potter series to analyze US race, class and gender. Is Dobby, the house elf facing racism? Is Hermione, a girl, clearly leadership material? Do Draco and Ron's lives mirror US class inequality? Course Information: Same as WGS 381. This course fulfills an Engaged Citizenship Common Experience requirement at UIS in the area of U.S. Communities.

SOA 405. Sociocultural Theories. 4 Hours.

In-depth study of classical social theorists (Marx, Weber, Durkheim, Mead) and their answer(s) to the central question of sociology, "Where does order come from?'' Course Information: Prerequisite: At least one upper-division sociology and one upper-division anthropology course, or permission of instructor.

SOA 408. Feminist Theories. 4 Hours.

What would a good society be like? We will discuss a range of feminist theories with different views on the good society, including liberal, radical, socialist, post modern, and global feminisms. These theories offer different solutions to such social issues as division of labor in the home and beyond, reproductive rights, and sexuality. Through the experience of the course, each student will work to develop his or her own view of a good society. Course Information: Same as PHI 411, PSC 433, and WGS 411. Prerequisite: WGS 301 is recommended but not required.

SOA 410. Senior Seminar. 3 Hours.

A seminar for SOA majors in their final year. Builds and further develops students' sociological/anthropological research, writing, and analytical abilities through application of these skills to a senior essay topic. Focus on the senior essay topics will derive from intense examinations of how sociological/anthropological knowledge can be applied to at least four issues facing society. Seminar discussions will be evaluated for content and presentations, and two senior essays will be the culmination of the course. These essays will be reviewed by all program faculty and will constitute the assessment in the major for each SOA graduate. Course Information: Prerequisite: SOA major, and permission of instructor.

SOA 411. Social Research Methods. 4 Hours.

Interdisciplinary survey of social science research methods in cultural anthropology and sociology. First-hand experience carrying out class research projects. Critiques of social science research and methods, ethics in social research, generating research questions, operationalization through appropriate qualitative and quantitative methods, data entry, and strategies of data analysis.

SOA 419. ECCE: American Musics. 4 Hours.

Students from all backgrounds learn to use research tools developed by anthropologists, musicologists, folklorists, linguists, historians and others to cultivate an understanding and appreciation of musical styles, aesthetic views, and socio-cultural functions of music in differing U.S. sub-cultures. Course Information: Same as MUS 419. No prerequisites. This course fulfills an Engaged Citizenship Common Experience requirement at UIS in the area of U.S. Communities.

SOA 421. Criminological Theory. 3 Hours.

Classical and modern theories of crime; social and economic factors in criminal behavior, crime formation, and control; exploration of the justice system; and evaluation of treatment of offenders. All elements of criminology viewed critically. Course Information: Same as CCJ 421. Prerequisite: CCJ 315 and CCJ 345, submission of communication skills portfolio (CCJ majors only).

SOA 422. ECCE: Environmental Sociology. 4 Hours.

The goal of this course is to provide an introduction to some of the key areas of research in the sub-discipline of environmental sociology, a field of inquiry that focuses on the relationship between society and the biophysical environment. We will explore how human societies affect their environments, and how human societies are shaped by their environments, as well as how we come to recognize and understand changing environmental conditions. Course Information: Same as ENS 422. This course fulfills an Engaged Citizenship Common Experience requirement at UIS in the area of Global Awareness.

SOA 425. Law and Inequality. 3,4 Hours.

The role of law and the legal system in creating, maintaining, and reducing inequality, with emphasis on race, class, and gender inequality in the United States. The relationship between law and the legal system and political/economic institutions and ideologies. Course Information: Same as LES 404, PSC 421, and WGS 445.

SOA 426. ECCE:Teen Talk-Culture and Adolesence. 4 Hours.

This course employs an anthropological perspective to explore the portrayal of adolescence in literature and film. We consider adolescence as both a cultural construction and literary device. Themes include adolescence in multicultural America, introducing culture through adolescent characters, adolescents and social critique, scapegoating adolescents, and adolescent resistance. Course Information: This course fulfills an Engaged Citizenship Common Experience requirement at UIS in the areas of U.S. Communities.

SOA 428. ECCE: Culture, Health, and Power. 4 Hours.

Explores ideas about health, illness, and treatment across cultures and how to communicate effectively with people from other cultures (and one's own!). We consider how gender, race, and class affect health, and the role of political-economic contexts. This interdisciplinary, international course draws on anthropology, public health, health sciences, and political economy and includes films. Topics include qualitative methods, critiquing Western biomedicine, health belief systems, international health programs, social identity and health, and the healthcare and pharmaceutical industries. Course Information: This course fulfills an Engaged Citizenship Common Experience requirement at UIS in the area of Global Awareness.

SOA 431. Sociology of Organizations. 4 Hours.

Organizations -- formal and informal; social organization and crowd concepts; roles, norms, and structures; methodology for studying organizational behavior; critical evaluation of organization theories; alienation; and organization vs. personality.

SOA 432. ECCE: Culture and Education. 4 Hours.

This course will use an inter-disciplinary theoretical framework that draws upon anthropology, sociology, sociolinguistics, and psychology to understand the relationship between class, race, and gender and school achievement. Explanations of students' school successes and failures that employ linguistic and cultural variables will be considered. Course Information: Same as AAS 423. This course fulfills an Engaged Citizenship Common Experience requirement at UIS in the area of U.S. Communities.

SOA 434. ECCE: Women and Work. 4 Hours.

In spite of decades of public laws and policies that mandate non-discrimination, women still face profound sex, race and class discrimination in the workplace in the U.S., reinforcing their status as outsiders. Topics will include wage and home labor, the double workday, comparable worth, occupational segregation, and sexual harassment. Course Information: Same as WGS 434. This course fulfills an Engaged Citizenship Common Experience requirement at UIS in the area of U.S. Communities.

SOA 435. ECCE: Immigrants, Public Opinion, and Public Policy. 4 Hours.

This interdisciplinary course focuses on a range of contemporary issues dealing with Asian and Latino immigrant communities in the U.S. It examines kinds of communities that immigrants and their descendants form in response to their local environments. Racial and gender inequalities, healthcare, poverty and education of these communities will be discussed. Course Information: This course fulfills an Engaged Citizenship Common Experience requirement at UIS in the area of U.S. Communities.

SOA 441. ECCE: Global Social Stratification. 4 Hours.

This course applies sociological theories of stratification and inequality using case studies within a global context. Students will read and discuss various ethical issues surrounding social inequalities and explore possible policy-directed methods of alleviating some of the problems associated with stratification. Course Information: This course fulfills an Engaged Citizenship Common Experience requirement at UIS in the area of Global Awareness.

SOA 442. Mexican Migration to the U. S.. 4 Hours.

This interdisciplinary course on Mexican migration to the US examines global power inequalities that lead to international migration. Topics include the formation of the US-Mexico border, why people migrate from Mexico, how most Mexican immigration has become "illegal," and the contributions of Mexican immigrants to the United States and Mexico. Course Information: Same as GBL 442 and PSC 442.

SOA 444. Legal Anthropology. 3-4 Hours.

Legal Anthropology is the cross-cultural and fieldwork-based study of social ordering. It takes as its primary object of study the symbols and practices employed by people in creating, navigating, and altering the rules and norms of their communities. This course will examine legal practices around the world for similarities and differences in their uses of ritual, myth, language, ideology, and power. Course information: Same as LES 444.

SOA 451. ECCE: Women of Color and Minority Women. 4 Hours.

This course examines the experiences of African American, Latina, Asian American, indigenous, and immigrant women in the US. By placing women of color at the center, we explore ways of transforming knowledge about culture and society. We also address issues facing other minorities (lesbians and disabled, poor, rural, and aging women). Course Information: Same as AAS 403, HIS 453, SWK 462, and WGS 403. This course fulfills an Engaged Citizenship Common Experience requirement at UIS in the area of U.S. Communities.

SOA 452. Sociology of Gender. 4 Hours.

Analysis of creation, maintenance, and enforcement of female and male roles. Socialization processes, cultural definitions, major social institutions, and structured social inequality. Course Information: Same as WGS 452.

SOA 454. Family Law. 3,4 Hours.

Topics include divorce, domestic violence, illegitimacy, adoption, child support and custody, parental control, abuse and neglect laws, issues affecting the elderly, domestic law reform, and the impact of the women's rights movement. Course Information: Same as HDC 446, LES 446, SWK 446, and WGS 446. Not for Freshman or Sophomores.

SOA 455. Women in Political Movements: A Cross-Cultural Perspective. 4 Hours.

Investigates gender dynamics of political movements in several countries around the world, including the United States, Brazil, Russia, Egypt, Iran, and India. The course examines gender as a dynamic social institution, interacting with class, race, nationality, sexual orientation, and culture. Course Information: Same as WGS 456.

SOA 456. Global Masculinities. 4 Hours.

Interdisciplinary survey of expressions of masculinity in global and transnational perspective, with emphasis on non-Western cultures. Themes and topics include motives for, and ethnographic and systematic approaches to study of men and masculinities interspersed with case studies of specific forms of masculinity in various geographic regions. Course Information: Same as GBL 455 and WGS 455. Prerequisite: Prior mastery of fundamental concepts, theories and terminology in WGS.

SOA 457. ECCE: Masculinities. 4 Hours.

This course is an introductory and inter-disciplinary survey of the study of men and masculinities primarily in the contemporary United States. Major themes are the rationale for study men and masculinities; gender, power, and male privilege; the utility of the plural term 'masculinities'; the social construction of masculinities; masculine cultures of sports, war, and violence; masculinity in popular culture; and alternative masculinities. Course Information: Same as WGS 457.

SOA 458. ECCE: Global Social Change and Transnational Movements. 4 Hours.

This course will draw from an interdisciplinary framework to examine the theories and research on global social change with attention to the world historical development of normative, political, and economic institutions. We will analyze the emergence of contemporary global social movements. Course Information: Same as PSC 458. This course fulfills an Engaged Citizenship Common Experience requirement at UIS in the areas of Global Awareness.

SOA 461. Social Psychology: Sociological Perspectives. 4 Hours.

An investigation of the complex relationship between individuals and the society around them. Topics include socialization, the self, social influence, motivation, norms, morality, group dynamics, roles, impression management, and interaction. We will explore these topics by studying the work of Simmel, Mead, Goffman, and Berger & Luckman, among others. We will see that and why individuals and their society are inseparable. Course Information: Prerequisite: A course in social science or permission of instructor.

SOA 464. Sociology of Mental Health/Illness. 4 Hours.

This class examines mental health/illness as a social issue shaped by history, culture, politics, and economics, rather than an individual medical or psychological problem. Using a social constructionist approach, we explore how social factors (social class, sex/gender, race/ethnicity, marital status) impact the definition/causes of and responses to mental health/illness.

SOA 465. Religion, Society, and the Individual. 4 Hours.

Explores the complex relationship between Society and Religion by reading and discussing the core thinkers in the field, including Durkheim, Weber, and Berger. Topics include the social foundations of religious beliefs, rituals, rationality, and secularization. Course Information: Prerequisite: A Social Science course or consent of the instructor.

SOA 472. European Prehistory. 4 Hours.

Overview of prehistoric cultures of Europe from the earliest arrival of human ancestors to the Iron Age. Emphasis on hunter-gatherer adaptations to Ice Age climates, the spread of agriculture from the Near East, and the rise of regional polities. Course Information: Prerequisite: A course in archaeology or human evolution or consent of the instructor.

SOA 473. Archaeological Field Course/Germany. 4 Hours.

Intensive, on site training in archaeological field methods including survey, mapping, excavation, artifact and analysis. Lectures and excursions introduce students to the archaeology and history of southern Germany from Paleolithic to Medieval. Students live for three and a half weeks in the small towns of Blaubeuren. No previous experience or German language skills required. Participation fee required.

SOA 474. Jamaican Society. 4 Hours.

Explores the concepts of sociology, globalization, Jamaican culture and communication in a Jamaican community. The three week course requires that students perform service learning projects with Jamaican schools and organizations. This course is part of the global Experience Program. Course Information: Application is required of students who want to participate.

SOA 480. Topics in Sociology/Anthropology. 1-8 Hours.

Intensive study of a current sociological or anthropological topic. Description of topics for a given course will be stated in course schedule. Course Information: May be repeated if topics vary.

SOA 481. North American Indians: Culture and Ecology. 4 Hours.

North American Indians prior to and after contact with European-Americans. Emphasizes relationships between various cultures and their environmental settings. Course Information: Prerequisite: SOA 302, or permission of instructor.

SOA 482. Hunters And Gatherers. 4 Hours.

Anthropological examination of the recent history and current status of hunting and gathering societies. Emphasis on long-term interaction with settled farmers and world markets, land use and land claims, and the history of western visions of "primitive" societies. Ethnographic case studies from the Americas, Australia, Africa, and Asia. Emphasis on discussion and on learning to write about other cultures. Course Information: Prerequisite: A course in Sociology/Anthropology or consent of the instructor.

SOA 491. ECCE: Undergraduate Research. 3,4 Hours.

Independent/collaborative investigation of a specific topic of interest to the student. Before registration, a student must secure the commitment of a Sociology/Anthropology faculty member to direct and mentor the student on the project. Some combination of a research paper, IRB approval, and/or formal presentation may be required for credit.

SOA 499. Tutorial. 1-12 Hours.

Intended to supplement, not supplant, regular course offerings. Students interested in a tutorial must secure the consent of the faculty member concerned before registration and submit any required documentation to him or her. Course Information: May be repeated to a maximum of 12 hours.

SOA 501. Feminist Theories II. 4 Hours.

This seminar offers close readings of major theories and accompanying methodology such as socialist, postmodernist, queer and postcolonial feminism. Our analysis will draw on political studies, communications, history, anthropology, sociology and literary criticism. Topics can include sexuality, race/ethnicity, labor and subjectivity. Course Information: Same as PSC 533 and WGS 501. Prerequisite: WGS 411, or SOA 408, or PSC 433, or PHI 411.

SOA 563. Sociology of Death, Dying, and Bereavement. 4 Hours.

Consideration of social structures, attitudes, beliefs, and values about death, dying, and bereavement in contemporary American society as well as in other societies and other time periods. Medical, legal, religious, and psychological issues of death, dying, and bereavement also considered. Not recommended for persons recently bereaved. Course Information: Same as HMS 563.