Psychology

Bachelor of Arts
Undergraduate Minor

www.uis.edu/psychology/
Email: psy@uis.edu
O
ffice Phone: (217) 206-6696
Office
Location: UHB 3144

Departmental Goals and Objectives

Psychology is the scientific study of the complexities of human and animal behavior. This complexity is reflected by the fact that the American Psychological Association has over 50 divisions, each representing a general area of interest or expertise and each having its own set of theoretical and research publications. In addition, there are at least 240 separate areas of specialization represented by these divisions.

The goal of the Psychology curriculum is to help students become familiar with common theoretical and research perspectives while also studying topics of particular interest and value. To accomplish this goal, the Psychology curriculum contains two core courses that address the problem solving, critical thinking, and communication skills common to psychology as a whole (i.e., Research Methods in Psychology and Senior Seminar). Course concentrations allow students to further develop and apply these skills within particular content areas and with specific personal or career goals in mind.

A major in Psychology provides students with the fundamental liberal arts perspective and understanding of basic psychological issues appropriate for many entry-level positions in business, government, industry, health care, and education. For example, Psychology students planning to pursue an advanced degree in a helping field should follow the Clinical/Counseling Psychology concentration. Students planning to participate in the Teacher Education Program to obtain teacher certification should follow the Educational Psychology concentration. Students planning to obtain a position in business, government, or industry may choose to follow the Experimental Psychology concentration or, if they have an interest in a particular topic, they may decide to pursue any one of the other concentrations. Students taking courses for their own benefit or pleasure may wish to pursue the Individualized concentration and choose appropriate courses in consultation with their academic advisors. The Individualized concentration is offered online.

For students interested in the helping professions, a career in higher education, or doing research in the field, it must be emphasized that such activities generally require a graduate degree (M.A., M.S.W., Ph.D., Psy.D. or Ed.D.). Although the required core courses and recommended course concentrations are designed to offer an education appropriate for continued study at the graduate level, students may want to tailor their course selections to the particular admission requirements of a specific institution or profession. Psychology majors who plan to pursue advanced studies are strongly encouraged to consult with their academic advisors to design an appropriate undergraduate course plan.

The Psychology curriculum is structured to encourage students to pursue electives outside psychology as part of a broad liberal arts education. In addition, UIS requirements contribute to a broad educational experience. For example, internships provide students with an opportunity to integrate classroom learning and practical field experience, as well as to gain experience that may be useful in later decisions about employment or training. Placements have included local mental health centers, other mental health and community service organizations, and research positions.

The Bachelor's Degree

The Psychology department offers five concentrations within the major (listed below). Requirements for each concentration are linked.

Advising

All Psychology majors and minors should consult with the department advisor before registering for courses. The advisor helps students with the following issues:

Course scheduling (e.g., planning courses to take for upcoming semesters)
Petitions (e.g., waive a required course or request for upper-division credit)
Progress toward degree (e.g., Graduation Application Signature Form)
Appeals (e.g., Appeal of Academic Suspension or Satisfactory Academic Progress Appeal Form)

All Psychology majors should consult with their faculty advisor on the following issues:

Graduate school counseling (e.g., choosing the right graduate degree and program, the application process)
Career counseling (e.g., what job opportunities are there post-BA?)
Internship possibilities (e.g., should I do an internship? What internships are available?)

Grading Policy

Psychology majors and minors must earn a grade of C or better in all Psychology courses to use them for completion of degree requirements (grades of C- or lower will not be accepted).

Assessment of Learning within the Discipline

All Psychology majors are required to complete, at program entry and exit, an exam designed to assess scientific critical thinking skills, as well as a broad range of content knowledge and skill application within the discipline. PSY 301 Orientation and Entrance Assessment is a non-credit course used to track exam completion at entry. Students must register for PSY 301 during their first semester of enrollment as Psychology majors. Students who do not complete the entrance exam during their first semester will not be allowed to register for additional Psychology course work until the exam has been completed. Students will complete the exam a second time as part of the required, credit-bearing, capstone course PSY 471 Senior Seminar. Exit exam scores are used for Psychology Department curriculum review and planning.

Ethical Conduct

The Psychology department supports and adheres to the UIS Academic Integrity Policy (which can be found online at uis.edu/academicintegrity/). Students aware of cheating or plagiarism by others should report it to their advisors, another member of the department faculty, or the department chairperson. Possible sanctions for students who have been found to violate the Academic Integrity Policy are outlined in the policy.

Course Waiver Policy

Lower-division courses

Because academic work at the University of Illinois is considered to be a continuation of the student’s previous education, students who have earned a grade of B or better (grades of B- or lower will not be accepted) in a lower-division psychology course beyond an introductory psychology course at another institution (and have taken the course within the past six years) may petition to use it to waive the required course in a Psychology concentration. A waiver based on lower-division course work does not reduce the total number of credit hours required in the major.

Transfer Policy

Upper-division courses

Students must take at least 16 hours of psychology credit from UIS. Students who have earned a grade of C or better (grades of C- or lower will not be accepted) in upper-division psychology courses at other institutions within the past six years may, in consultation with an academic advisor, use those upper-division credits to reduce the total number of credit hours required for the Psychology major at UIS.

Degree Requirements

Psychology majors are required to take a minimum of 36 hours in Psychology. Eight of these hours must be PSY 302 Research Methods In Psychology (or its equivalent) and PSY 471 Senior Seminar. It is strongly recommended that PSY 302 be taken during the first semester and that PSY 471 be taken during the final semester. Students must save graded writing assignments from their courses for further use in PSY 471. The additional 28 hours will vary depending on the concentration selected or the individualized concentration designed by each student. All Psychology majors must declare their concentration selection by completing a Change of Curriculum form and submitting it to Records and Registration.

The department core course requirements and recommended 28-hour concentration options are as follows.

Core Courses (Required of ALL Psychology majors)

PSY 301Orientation and Entrance Assessment0
PSY 302Research Methods In Psychology4
PSY 471Senior Seminar4

Degree Plan*

*Listed below is a SUGGESTED Degree Plan.  For OFFICIAL program information, please refer to the catalog content above and consult your academic advisor.

Year 1
Fall Hours
ENG 1012Rhetoric and College Writing3
Freshman Seminar (Humanities)23
Visual/Performing Arts Humanities Requirement23
Math Skills23
General Education Requirement or Elective3
 Hours15
Spring  
ENG 1022College Writing and Civic Engagement3
Comparative Societies (Social Sciences)23
Humanities23
COM 1122Oral Communication3
PSY 2011Principles Of Psychology3
 Hours15
Year 2
Fall  
Lab Science (life or physical science)24
Social Science23
PSY 3011Orientation and Entrance Assessment0
PSY Elective44
ECCE U.S. Communities33
 Hours14
Spring  
Social Science23
Math Applied23
PSY 3024Research Methods In Psychology4
ECCE Global Awareness33
Non-lab Science (life or physical science)23
 Hours16
Year 3
Fall  
Core Concentration Course44
Core Concentration Course44
PSY Elective44
Upper division elective or minor course 54
 Hours16
Spring  
Core Concentration Course44
Upper division elective or minor course 54
PSY 467
IPL 3003
ECCE: Specialized Internship Applied Learning3
UNI 3013ECCE: Speakers Series1
Elective3
 Hours15
Year 4
Fall  
PSY Elective44
Core Concentration Course44
Upper division elective or minor course53
Upper division elective or minor course 54
 Hours15
Spring  
PSY 4714Senior Seminar4
Elective or minor course53
Upper division elective or minor course54
Upper division elective or minor course54
 Hours15
 Total Hours: 121
1

These courses are Lower Division Foundation course requirements - 3 hours

2

These courses fulfill General Education requirements - 43 Hours

3

Students must complete ECCEs in at least two of the three ECCE categories - U.S. Communities, Global Awareness, Engagement Experience, in addition to Speakers Series - 10 Hours

4

Psychology Major course work - 36 Hours

5

Upper Division Electives - minimum 12 hours that can be selected to earn a minor and can be outside of major

Individualized Concentration Online

Students who want to tailor course selections for personal interest, or to meet requirements for admission to a specific institution or profession, should consider the Individualized Concentration. It is recommended that students interested in the Individualized Concentration consult with their academic advisor to discuss course planning and goals for the concentration.

Core Courses
PSY 301Orientation and Entrance Assessment0
PSY 302Research Methods In Psychology4
PSY 471Senior Seminar4
Core Concentration Courses
Select 28 hours of upper division course work to fulfill the requirements of this concentration.28
Total Hours36

Psychology Minor

The entrance prerequisite course work for the Psychology minor is the same as for the major (PSY 201 or equivalent with a grade of C or better). To earn a minor in Psychology, students must complete a minimum of 16 semester hours, at least 12 of which must be upper-division course work taken at UIS. Four of these hours must be PSY 302 Research Methods In Psychology or its equivalent. Students who have earned a grade of C or better (grades of C- or lower will not be accepted) in upper-division psychology courses at another institution may use those courses as the basis for a reduction of up to four hours in the total hours required for a minor. PSY 302 is the only required course for a minor in Psychology. The remaining 12 hours may be selected from any upper-division psychology course offerings.

Degree Program Program Type Dept Application Materials and Admission Criteria Prerequisite Course Requirements Department ADM Review Dept Conditional Admits Dept Appeal Process
Psychology BAOn campus and OnlineAdditional Admission Criteria:

*On campus & Online: Earn a minimum of 30 semester hours of undergraduate course work

*On campus only: Minimum cumulative GPA of 2.50 on a 4.0 scale

*Online only: Minimum cumulative GPA of 3.0 on a 4.0 scale

Additional Application Materials Required (Online Only):

Supplement to application requiring applicant to present a rationale for pursuit of online degree format and discussion of access to the Internet as well as necessary technological/computer skills.

Preference will be given to Online applicants who:

1. Effectively demonstrate they are unable to attend on campus classes because of distance, work or care giving issues that are incompatible with regularly scheduled on-ground class offerings

2. Have completed at least 60 hours of undergraduate course work or earned an Associate's degree
*On campus & Online: Completion of PSY 201 or equivalent with a grade of C or better, or Advanced Placement Psychology Examination score greater than or equal to 4, or Introductory Psychology CLEP test score greater than or equal to 50.

*Online only: Minimum grade of C or better in both ENG 101 and ENG 102
Online only: Online program coordinator and Department ChairOn campus only: Yes; Students with cumulative GPA between 2.00 and 2.49 can be granted conditional admission, which permits enrollment in up to 12 semester hours of 300-level psychology courses during the first semester. Final decision on admission for conditionally admitted students is made after completion of 12 hours of psychology courses at UIS. 300-level courses must be completed within two semesters of the conditional admission.N/A

Courses

PSY 201. Principles Of Psychology. 3 Hours.

A survey of significant theory, issues, methods of inquiry, and applications in all areas of psychology. Course Information: This course fulfills a general education requirement at UIS in the area of Social and Behavioral Sciences (IAI Code: S6 900).

PSY 212. Brain and Emotion. 3 Hours.

This course investigates the underlying theories of emotion, cultural understandings of emotion, and the brain mechanisms of emotion. Course Information: This course fulfills a general education requirement at UIS in the area of Social and Behavioral Sciences.

PSY 214. Psychological Perception of Art. 3 Hours.

Throughout human history, art has played a role from cave-drawings to modern man sometimes paying millions of dollars for a work of art. How did this capacity and need for art evolve along with consciousness? We will explore how the visual process occurs when viewing diverse works of art. Course Information: This course fulfills a general education requirement at UIS in the area of Social and Behavioral Sciences.

PSY 241. Multicultural Psychology. 3 Hours.

This course provides an overview of the multicultural issues relevant in psychology, including culturally relevant styles of communication, values from different cultures, racial identity development, the development and impact of oppression, discrimination, and racism, power and privilege, and other issues relevant in explaining and understanding human behaviors. Course Information: This course fulfills a general education requirement at UIS in the area of Social and Behavioral Sciences.

PSY 301. Orientation and Entrance Assessment. 0 Hours.

Brief orientation to the major and pre-curriculum evaluation of undergraduate-level knowledge and skills within the discipline of psychology. Required for all psychology majors during their first semester of upper-division enrollment. Course Information: Credit/No Credit grading only. Prerequisite: PSY 201 or equivalent.

PSY 302. Research Methods In Psychology. 4 Hours.

The experimental method in psychology, including philosophical background and introduction to research strategies, designs, and descriptive statistics. Course Information: Prerequisite: PSY 201 or equivalent.

PSY 303. Statistics for the Behavioral Sciences. 4 Hours.

Overview of basic descriptive and inferential statistics with special emphasis on hypothesis testing and alternatives. (Strongly recommended for students planning to pursue graduate study.) Course Information: Prerequisite: PSY 201 or equivalent and completion of mathematics general education.

PSY 310. Special Topics in Psychology. 4 Hours.

Selected topics of special interest in the area of psychology at a 300 level that may vary from semester to semester. Course Information: Prerequisite: PSY 201 or equivalent. May be repeated if topics vary. Students may register in more than one section per term.

PSY 311. Cognitive Psychology. 4 Hours.

Overview of selected topics in memory, information processing, perception, problem solving, and artificial intelligence. Course Information: Prerequisite: PSY 201 or equivalent.

PSY 314. Sensation and Perception. 4 Hours.

This course studies how the brain makes sense of sensory inputs. Students will learn how the anatomy and physiology of the eye, ear, and related parts of the brain allow people to understand speech, perceive color, see motion and depth and recognize faces. Course Information: Prerequisite: PSY 201 or equivalent.

PSY 315. Psychoactive Drugs. 4 Hours.

Major classes of drugs that affect psychological processes and behavior; issues of drug use in treatment of mental disorders; drugs as a social problem. Course Information: Designated Writing Course. Prerequisite: PSY 201 or equivalent.

PSY 321. Life-span Developmental Psychology. 4 Hours.

Cognitive, emotional, and social development across the life span; determinants of individual differences and principles of mental and physical health throughout life. Course Information: Designated Writing Course. Prerequisite: PSY 201 or equivalent.

PSY 322. Child Development. 4 Hours.

Development of intelligence, language, and cognition; physical growth and social and personal development in newborns, infants, and toddlers and in early and middle childhood. Emphasis on child-rearing practices. Course Information: Designated Writing Course. Prerequisite: PSY 201 or equivalent.

PSY 323. Adolescence. 4 Hours.

Important changes in adolescents' physical, cognitive, emotional, and social characteristics will be examined. This includes understanding the contexts in which adolescents develop, such as family, peer groups, and school. How scientists study adolescent development and the theories they use to guide their research will also be covered. Course Information: Prerequisite: PSY 201 or equivalent.

PSY 324. Exceptional Child. 4 Hours.

Behaviors and conditions that make a child different from most other children, including all conditions addressed by Public Law 94-142. Topics include mental retardation; learning disabilities; behavior disorders; giftedness; and hearing, vision, and speech impairments. Course Information: Designated Writing Course. Prerequisite: PSY 201 or equivalent.

PSY 326. Family Psychology. 4 Hours.

Covers the five primary aspects of family psychology: family as a system; developmental family behavior; family of origin concepts and how they affect the family; relationships, dating, courtships, and marriage; and family dysfunctions. Course Information: Designated Writing Course. Prerequisite: PSY 201 or equivalent.

PSY 327. Educational Psychology. 4 Hours.

Topics in psychology relevant to teaching: educational objectives, student characteristics and development, the learning process, and evaluation of learning. Course Information: Designated Writing Course. Prerequisite: PSY 201 or equivalent.

PSY 331. Social Psychology. 4 Hours.

Survey of major theories and selected areas of research in social psychology. Course Information: Prerequisite: PSY 201 or equivalent.

PSY 332. Sport Psychology. 4 Hours.

Overview of psychological theory and research as it relates to sport and exercise at the individual and group levels. Course Information: Prerequisite: PSY 201 or equivalent.

PSY 333. Positive Psychology. 4 Hours.

This course will explore concepts and research related to positive psychology. Well-being will be examined in the context of motivation, flow, love, creativity, and spirituality. While such study will include the major theoretical approaches to positive psychology, an equally significant focus will be on the application of this information to everyday life experiences. Course Information: Prerequisites: PSY 201.

PSY 335. Health Psychology. 4 Hours.

This course will assist students in developing knowledge of the field of health psychology. It examines the relationship between biological, psychological, and social factors as they interact with and affect health. Course information: Prerequisites: PSY 201 or equivalent.

PSY 336. Psychology of Eating Disorders/Obesity. 4 Hours.

This course surveys topics related to eating disorders and obesity, including etiology, assessment, diagnosis, treatment, and prevention. Specific focus is given to the dispositional, social, and cultural factors associated with the development and maintenance of disordered eating patterns. Implications for psychological and physical health are examined. Course information: Prerequisites: PSY 201 or equivalent.

PSY 338. Psychological Aspects of Diversity. 4 Hours.

Overview of selected aspects of human diversity relevant to American psychology. Examines historical and contemporary psychological perspectives on race, ethnicity, gender, and sexual orientation, as well as factors linked to stereotyping, cultural bias, and prejudice. Special emphasis placed on a critical review of past psychological research and formulation of new research questions. Course Information: Designated Writing Course. Prerequisite: PSY 201 or equivalent.

PSY 339. Psychology of Gender. 4 Hours.

Gender issues cut across many areas of psychology. This course provides an overview of how biological and cultural factors influence the development of gender roles, identities, and stereotypes of masculinity and femininity and how these affect out lives at the personal, social, and institutional levels. Course Information: Prerequisite: PSY 201 or equivalent.

PSY 341. Industrial-Organizational Psychology. 4 Hours.

This course will examine the various issues relevant to industrial and organizational psychology, including job analysis, personnel selection, organizational behavior, and occupational health and stress. Course Information: Prerequisite: PSY 201.

PSY 351. Abnormal Psychology. 4 Hours.

Theories, research, and classification systems relevant to abnormal behavior. Emphasis on current diagnostic and descriptive systems. Course Information: Designated Writing Course. Prerequisite: PSY 201 or equivalent.

PSY 352. Multicultural Counseling. 4 Hours.

This course will examine the various multicultural issues relevant to counseling and clinical psychology, and the importance of providing culturally-competent psychological services to diverse populations. Course Information: Prerequisite: PSY 201 or equivalent.

PSY 410. Advanced Topics in Psychology. 4 Hours.

Selected topics of special interest in the area of psychology, at the 400 level, that may vary from semester to semester. Course Information: May be repeated if topics vary. Students may register in more than one section per term. Prequisites: PSY 201 and PSY 302 or equivalents.

PSY 412. Introduction To Biopsychology. 4 Hours.

Introduction to the biological bases of behavior. Topics include structure and function of the nervous system, sensory processing, sleep, reproductive behavior, language, and mental disorders. Course Information: Prerequisite: PSY 201 and PSY 302 or equivalent.

PSY 413. Psychology of Learning and Memory. 4 Hours.

Explores the question of how humans and animals learn, store and recall information. Major theories of memory will be covered with an emphasis on cognitive models of memory systems, biological underpinnings, and disorders of memory. Designated Writing Course. Course Information: Prerequisite: PSY 201 and PSY 302, or equivalents.

PSY 416. Psychology Of Motivation. 4 Hours.

Explores four constructs that define human, rather than nonhuman, motivation including needs, cognitions, emotions, and external events that arise from genetic, physiological, psychological, interpersonal, and cultural sources. The emphasis is on theoretical as well as practical issues that overlap among varying psychological fields. Course Information: Prerequisite: PSY 201 and PSY 302 or equivalent.

PSY 417. Perceptual Learning. 4 Hours.

This course examines the connections between sensory input and perception using cognitive neuroscience theories and the effectiveness of various practice techniques and changes in the brain that accompany learning. Course Information: Prerequisite: PSY 201 and PSY 302, or equivalents.

PSY 433. Political Psychology. 3,4 Hours.

Both political science and psychology study how individuals interact with their environment, other individuals and groups. We will use theories and findings from both disciplines to gain deeper insights into political processes and decisions. Likely topics include stereotyping, trust, schemas, heuristics, media effects, social identity, and political tolerance. Course Information: Same as PSC 412. Undergraduates are restricted to 3 credit hour sections; graduates are restricted to 4 credit hour sections.

PSY 441. Theories of Personality. 4 Hours.

Major theories of personality and determinants of individual differences. Course Information: Designated Writing Course. Prerequisite: PSY 201 and PSY 302, or equivalents.

PSY 452. Introduction to Clinical Psychology. 4 Hours.

Systematic examination of major perspectives, techniques, skills, and career options related to the field of clinical psychology. Course Information: Designated Writing Course. Prerequisite: PSY 201, PSY 302, and PSY 351 or equivalent.

PSY 453. Psychological Foundations for Helping. 4 Hours.

Preprofessional introduction to therapeutic processes for students considering counseling or clinical psychology careers. Includes systematic training in fundamental helping attitudes and skills. Course Information: Prerequisite: PSY 302.

PSY 454. Theories of Psychotherapy. 4 Hours.

Systematic examination of the theories, research, and diagnostic and treatment issues regarding various types of abnormal behavior. Course Information: Prerequisite: PSY 201, PSY 302, and PSY 351 or equivalents.

PSY 457. Behavior Modification: Principles and Techniques. 4 Hours.

Concepts and techniques involved in the assessment and modification of behavior within an operant conditioning model. Includes the collection of baseline data, the control of reinforcements and punishments, and the monitoring of changes in target behaviors. Course Information: Prerequisite: PSY 201 and PSY 302 or equivalent.

PSY 458. Psychological Tests and Measurements. 4 Hours.

Basic theories of psychological tests and of test construction and interpretation. Includes representative tests and examines contemporary issues in testing. Course Information: Prerequisite: PSY 201 and PSY 302, or equivalents.

PSY 466. Working with Victims of Sexual Assault and Abuse. 3 Hours.

Provides the 40 hour training required of all professionals and volunteers interested in working for agencies that deal with victims of sexual assault and abuse. Includes information and training in counseling, advocacy, and hotline skills. Course Information: Credit/No Credit grading only. Prerequisite: PSY 201, PSY 302 and PSY 351, or equivalents.

PSY 467. ECCE: Specialized Internship Applied Learning. 1-2 Hours.

Seminar for psychology majors who wish to complete more intensive internship placements in a mental health, social service, child care, or law enforcement agency for university credit. Requires program approval, concurrent enrollment in IPL 300 during each semester of placement activities, and 150 hours of on-site work for every three hours of combined IPL 300/ PSY 467 course credit. Applications for specialized placement should be filed with the program no later than one month prior to placement semester. Up to 6 credit hours of combined IPL 300/ PSY 467 credit may be used to fulfill upper-division UIS requirements. Course Information: Credit/No Credit grading only. May be repeated to a maximum of 6 hours. Prerequisite: PSY 201 or equivalent and psychology major with at least 12 upper-division hours in psychology at UIS and permission of instructor. This course fulfills an Engaged Citizenship Common Experience requirement at UIS in the area of Engagement Experience.

PSY 471. Senior Seminar. 4 Hours.

An integrative capstone experience for psychology majors involving the development of individual portfolios reflecting student learning within the discipline. Students will prepare evidence of learning within five dimensions of psychology and will complete the psychology exit exam. Course Information: Prerequisite: PSY 201 and PSY 302, all required concentration courses, and senior status.

PSY 480. Senior Research Project. 1-4 Hours.

Selected (empirical) research project researched, developed, designed, and written by the student with faculty supervision. Course Information: May be repeated to a maximum of 4 hours with approval. Prerequisite: PSY 201, PSY 302 and PSY 303.

PSY 481. Perspectives on Child Maltreatment and Advocacy. 3 Hours.

Covers the history, comparative perspectives, legal framework, responses to child maltreatment, the skills necessary to do the work, and other pertinent issues pertaining to child maltreatment and child advocacy. The approach of the course will be from a variety of diverse, professional perspectives. The course is designed for students majoring in public administration, criminal justice, psychology, social work, sociology, legal studies or other areas where knowledge of child maltreatment and advocating for children might be necessary or beneficial. Course Information: Same as PAD 481, TEP 481, and SWK 481. Prerequisites: PSY 201 and PSY 302.

PSY 482. Global Child Advocacy Studies. 3 Hours.

The purpose of this course is to prepare students to recognize child advocacy issues around the world. The course is designed for students majoring in public administration, criminal justice, education, social work, nursing, psychology, legal studies, or other areas where knowledge of child maltreatment and advocating for children will be necessary. Multidisciplinary approaches to advocacy in different countries throughout the world will be presented and discussed. Course Information: Same as PAD 482 and TEP 482. Prerequisite: PAD 481.

PSY 484. Childhood Trauma: Risk and Resiliency. 3,4 Hours.

This course examines the psychological effects of trauma on children. Specifically, the impact of physical, emotional, and sexual abuse and neglect, war, terrorism, and natural disasters are explored. The concepts of resilience and posttraumatic growth are discussed to discover why many affected children successfully traverse their trauma. Additionally, interventions and treatment for trauma in childhood are considered. Course information: Prerequisites: PSY 321 or PSY 322. Same as PAD 484.

PSY 490. Independent Study in Psychology. 2-4 Hours.

Selected topics by agreement with a member of the psychology faculty; topics, methods of study, and means of evaluation to be negotiated between student and faculty member. Course Information: May be repeated if topics vary. Students may register in more than one section per term. Prerequisite: PSY 201 and PSY 302 or equivalent. Restricted to Psychology. A maximum of 4 hours may be used for psychology electives.

PSY 499. Tutorial. 1-12 Hours.

Intended to supplement, not supplant, regular course offerings. Students interested in a tutorial must secure the consent of the faculty member concerned before registration and submit any required documentation to him or her. Course Information: May be repeated to a maximum of 12 hours if topics vary. Students may register in more than one section per term. Prerequisite: PSY 201 and PSY 302 or equivalent. Restricted to Psychology. A maximum of 4 hours may be used for psychology electives.