Liberal Studies

Bachelor of Arts in Liberal Studies
Undergraduate Minor in Liberty Studies
Master of Arts in Liberal and Integrative Studies

www.uis.edu/liberalstudies/
Email: lis@uis.edu
Office Phone: (217) 206-6962
Office Location: UHB 3038

Departmental Goals and Objectives

Through careful self-assessment and goal-setting, Liberal Studies students design individual degree plans in consultation with their advisor/instructor in LIS 301 where students identify learning needs and strategies for meeting those needs.  Students pursue their degree through course work selected from throughout the university as well as independent studies, service learning, and credit for prior learning. In order to plan a balanced degree, students choose electives that address the following seven broad subject categories: identity, work, nature, institutions, language, heritage, and art.

Although degree plans must be broad enough to meet the interdisciplinary goals of the degree, students may choose a thematic focus for their degrees, such as international studies or human resource development. In addition, students may have a minor such as African-American Studies, Business, Liberty Studies, Philosophy, or Women and Gender Studies. Online students should be aware that not all of the areas available to students taking classes on campus are available online.

Students can complete the curriculum in the classroom, entirely online via the Internet, or in combination. Learners have a good chance for success in the Liberal Studies degree if they are self-directed, able to plan ahead and meet deadlines, disciplined enough to organize individualized programs of study, and able to work independently to set and meet goals. In addition, students who choose to participate in Liberal Studies online should be comfortable using networked information technologies, navigating the Internet, using email, and learning from a distance.

The Bachelor's Degree

The structure of the Bachelor of Arts in Liberal Studies emphasizes the integration of key learning categories with a variety of instructional methods to form a well-rounded and individualized academic experience. Through customized learning activities, the degree assists students in enhancing critical thinking and problem-solving skills, living as engaged and responsible citizens, considering ethics and consequences of actions, and being familiar with a broad and integrated core of knowledge.

The Liberal Studies degree formally begins with LIS 301, which should ideally be taken during the first semester of a student’s junior year, or during the second semester of his/her sophomore year. Prior to this, students should work with their academic advisors to ensure that they have completed (or will soon complete) the required general education curriculum and the prerequisites necessary to enter their junior year. Campus-based students who begin their degrees at UIS should complete the general education curriculum before taking LIS 301.

Admission Requirements

Students seeking admission to the Liberal Studies program must meet all campus requirements for undergraduate admission.  Information about these requirements is available from the Office of Admissions.  The department requires no additional application for admission.

Online Admission

Students seeking admission to the online Liberal Studies must meet all campus requirements for undergraduate admission.  In addition, applicants must have completed at least 30 hours of transfer credit prior to admission into the online program.   The department recommends that applicants to the online program consider the following items before deciding to apply.

The department encourages applicants to the online program to have completed Illinois General Education requirements before applying.  Students who have earned an Associate of Arts, Associate of Science, Associate of Arts and Science, or an Associate of Arts in Teaching at an Illinois school have completed Illinois General Education requirements.

If you have not completed Illinois General Education, the department recommends that you work with the LIS Program Coordinator to determine your needs and to discuss how the program may, or may not, be able to serve your General Education needs in an online format.

Liberal Studies is a writing intensive degree.  Online applicants must have successfully completed at least two semesters of freshman-level composition for admission into the program.

Transfer Courses

There are no special prerequisite courses for this major. 

 

Advising

On completion of LIS 301, degree plans are approved by the department, although it is expected that the degree plan will change as new courses or ideas emerge for the student.

Revisions are approved by the academic adviser or Program Director. Final department approval of a student’s degree is granted through the successful completion of LIS 451 Senior Seminar.

Students should consult with advisers in the major for specific guidance regarding the completion of general education requirements. The Department’s online coordinator can advise students on most matters and answer many questions, while faculty within the program and the Program Director can offer definitive departmental advice on academic matters.

Grading Policy

The following courses are offered only on a CR/NC basis: LIS 301, LIS 342, LIS 380 and LIS 451.

Communication Skills

All competencies necessary to attain the student’s goals, including communication skills, are addressed in the degree plan. Assessment of written communication skills occurs throughout LIS 301 culminating in the student's degree plan.  Communication skills are further developed as documented by the student's degree plan. Completion of the degree plan constitutes certification of communication skills as required by UIS. This certification of the communication skills is again earned when a student successfully completes LIS 451 Senior Seminar.

Designated Boyer Area Courses

In order to plan a balanced degree program, students must choose electives that address the following seven Boyer categories, at least one upper-division course in each of the seven areas listed is required:

  • Identity, the search for meaning

  • Work, the value of vocation

  • Nature, ecology of the planet

  • Institutions, the social web

  • Language, the crucial connection

  • Heritage, the living past

  • Art, the esthetic dimension

Specific Boyer area courses will be determined during the student’s enrollment in LIS 301 with the development of their personalized degree plan. The LIS program must approve all changes to this plan and verify degree completion via submission of the Graduation Application Signature form to the Office of Records and Registration. The LIS department will not submit this form until it has confirmed the student has demonstrated degree completion.

Degree Requirements

Core Courses
LIS 301Self-Directed Learning4
LIS 451Senior Seminar3
At least 12 hours of 300 or 400 level LIS prefix courses in addition to LIS 301 and LIS 451 10-12
Boyer Category Courses: At least three hours of 300 or 400 level courses must be completed in each Boyer area
Art3
Any 300- or 400-level ART, MUS, or THE course
ECCE: Black Women in Film History
Voice and Movement
Digital Media: Print
Digital Media: Web
Visual Storytelling and Reporting
Intermediate Acting
The Beatles: Popular Music and Society
Playing Shakespeare
Graphic Novel
ECCE: Serving up Art
ECCE: European Cinema
The Beatles: Popular Music and Society
ECCE: Expatriate Paris
ECCE: Symbolist Movement in Europe: 1850 - 1920
Philosophy of Art
ECCE: Music and Social Justice
Jazz in American Culture
ECCE: American Musics
Heritage3
Any 300- or 400-level AAS course
ECCE: European Cinema
Egyptology
Modern Art History
Contemporary Art History
Women in Art: Discovering Her Story
ECCE: Race, Class, and Social Justice
Introduction to Human Rights
Gender Communication
ECCE: Intercultural Communication
Political Communication in the United States
ECCE:Communicating About Race
History Of Economic Thought
ECCE: From China to Chinese America
ECCE: Contemporary African Literature
Topics in American Literature I
ECCE: Asian American Women
Women Playwrights
The American Novel, 1865-1915
ECCE: American Souths
The British Victorian Novel
Children's and Young Adult Literature
History of English Language
Literature and Culture of Early America
American Literature 1820-1865
American Literature Between the Wars
African-American Literature
Major Figures in American Literature Since 1900
Midwestern Literature
The Shakespeare Project
The British Romantics
Topics in British Literature II
Poetry and Prose of the Victorian Age
The British Novel from Dickens to Hardy
Major Women Writers
Literature and the Bible
Memoirs Across Cultures
ECCE: Latina/o USA
Mexican Migration to the U. S.
Introduction to Human Rights
ECCE: Latina/o USA
ECCE: US Women's History
History of American Law
Topics in Warfare
Islamic Civilization
ECCE: Conflict in the Middle East
ECCE: Christian-Muslim Encounters
Alexander the Great
Rise of Rome
Caesar to Charlemagne
Egyptology
ECCE: Politics and Religion: Culture Wars
ECCE: Ancient Sport and Spectacle
African-American History
ECCE: Civil Rights Movement of the Twentieth Century
Colonial America
Revolutionary America
United States, 1790-1840
United States, 1840-1890
United States, 1890-1945
United States, 1945-Present
The Sixties
American Environmental History
American Agricultural History
Topics In U.S. History
The Civil War and Reconstruction
American Urban History
Intellectual Origins of the American Revolution
American Westward Expansion
Major Figures in History
American Revivalism and Christian Religion
ECCE: Women of Color and Minority Women
ECCE: History of the Family
Studies in Latin American History
Europe in the 18th Century: The Enlightenment
ECCE: Conflict in 19th Century Europe
Topics in 20th Century World History
History of the Soviet Union
ECCE: Nationalism and Imperialism
Modern China
ECCE: From Vikings to Hackers: A Pirate's World History
History of Sexuality in America
History of Christmas
Eastern Christianity
History of American Law
ECCE: American Political Thought
Introduction to Human Rights
Individualism and Self-Reliance in America
ECCE: Latina/o USA
Baseball: An Interdisciplinary Approach
ECCE: Ancient Sport and Spectacle
ECCE: Music and Social Justice
Jazz in American Culture
ECCE: American Musics
ECCE: The Changing American Family and Public Policy
Classical Greek Wisdom
Ancient & Medieval Philosophy
History of Modern Philosophy
Europe in the 18th Century: the Enlightenment
ECCE: African Americans and American Politics
ECCE: Politics and Religion: Culture Wars
ECCE: Women and Politics
ECCE: American Political Thought
ECCE: Latina/o USA
Mexican Migration to the U. S.
ECCE: Latina/o USA
ECCE: Women and Work
Mexican Migration to the U. S.
North American Indians: Culture and Ecology
ECCE: US Women's History
ECCE: History of the Family
Identity3
ECCE: African American Studies
ECCE: Contemporary African Literature
ECCE: African American Popular Culture
ECCE: African American Popular Culture
Women's Spirituality
Philosophy of Art
Business, Ethics, and Society
ECCE: Business Ethics
Persuasion
ECCE: Memoirs Across Cultures
Human Well Being
Introduction to Political Philosophy
Ideas, Ethics, and Public Policy
Feminist Theories
Cognitive Psychology
Life-span Developmental Psychology
Child Development
Adolescence
Psychology of Gender
Psychology of Learning and Memory
Psychology Of Motivation
Theories of Personality
Theories of Psychotherapy
ECCE: Introduction to Women and Gender Studies
ECCE: Gay and Lesbian Studies
Feminist Theories
ECCE: Masculinities
ECCE: Introduction to Women and Gender Studies
ECCE: Gay and Lesbian Studies
Feminist Theories
Queer Theory
Sociology of Gender
ECCE: Masculinities
Native American Women's Literature and Culture
Women's Spirituality
History of Sexuality in America
Childhood's Past
Institutions3
ECCE: African Americans and American Politics
ECCE: Civil Rights Movement of the Twentieth Century
ECCE: Regulation and the American Economy
Current Issues in Business: A Liberal Studies Perspective
Business, Ethics, and Society
Legal Environment of Business
Franchising
ECCE: Business and Developing Countries
Business Policy
Financial Institution Management
ECCE: Policing In America
Correctional Systems
Crime & Sentencing Policy
Physical Evidence Processing
Issues of Intervention: Law Enforcement and Human Services
Corrections and the Mass Media
ECCE: Women and Criminal Justice
ECCE: International Criminal Justice Systems
Alternatives to Incarceration
Contemporary Issues in Law Enforcement
Community Policing
Critical Incident Resources and Response
Gangs, Crime, and Justice
ECCE: Communities, Fear, and Crime Control
Crime Myths and Moral Panic
Criminology of Sport
ECCE: Crime and Sentencing: Global Issues
Law Enforcement Challenges: Terrorism
Criminal Procedure
Substantive Criminal Law
Justice and Juveniles
Juvenile Law
Probation Supervision Programs
ECCE: Science and World Religions
ECCE: Energy and the Environment
Media Law And Ethics
ECCE: Children, Adolesents, and the Media
Communication Ethics
Political Communication in the United States
ECCE:Communicating About Race
RoboEthics
ECCE: Internet in American Life
Managerial Economics
Macroeconomics in a Global Economy
Analytical Decision Making for BUS and ECO
Economics for Administration
Money, Banking, and Financial Markets
Comparative Economic Systems
Economics for Managerial Decisions
Financial Economics
Securities Markets
Economic Development
International Trade and Finance
International Business
Public Finance
Industrial Organization
Business Cycles
ECCE: Interdisciplinary Study of Work
ECCE: Creative Writing, Publishing, and Community
ECCE: Global Change in Local Places
ECCE: Population and Public Policy
ECCE: Geopolitics: Geographical Aspects of International Affairs
ECCE: Environmental Ethics
ECCE: China's Environment and the World
Introduction to Global Studies
Transition in Central and Eastern Europe
Introduction to Human Rights
Family Law
ECCE: Conflict in the Middle East
ECCE: Christian-Muslim Encounters
ECCE: Democracy and Democratic Theory
ECCE: Politics and Religion: Culture Wars
ECCE: Ancient Sport and Spectacle
ECCE: Civil Rights Movement of the Twentieth Century
ECCE: Nationalism and Imperialism
ECCE: Working for Women: Service-Learning and Gender Inequality
ECCE: Charity to Change
Social Responsibility and Leadership Development Capstone
ECCE: Social Change and Leadership
American Law in Comparative Perspective
Law and Society
ECCE: Sexual Orientation and Public Policy
ECCE: Sexuality, Law, and Politics
The American Jury
Philosophy of Law
American Constitution: Government Powers and Institutions
The Supreme Court and Judicial Politics
The American Constitution and Civil Liberties
Environmental Law
National Security Issues and the U.S. Constitution
ECCE: Politics and Religion: Culture Wars
Family Law
Women in American Law
Juvenile Law
Employment Discrimination Law
Law, Film and Popular Culture
The Politics of Reproduction
The Politics of Prosecution
International Law and Organizations
Labor Law
The Law of Military Conflict
Law of Evidence
Government Regulations and Administrative Law
Criminal Procedure
Substantive Criminal Law
ECCE: Conviction of the Innocent
ECCE: Serving up Art
ECCE: Interdisciplinary Study of Work
ECCE: European Cinema
Liberty Struggles
Free Market Philosophies
ECCE: Ancient Sport and Spectacle
ECCE: Symbolist Movement in Europe: 1850 - 1920
Managing Organizational Behavior
Social Responsibility and Ethics: Corporate and Public
Organization Development
ECCE: Work, Family and Community: A U. S. Perspective
Organization Theory
ECCE: Global Evironmental Health
ECCE: Food, Health, and Public Policy
Environmental Law
ECCE: Chemicals and the Citizen
ECCE: Crisis in Environmental Health
Food Safety Practice and Policy
ECCE: Environmental Policies: Air Quality
ECCE: Solid and Hazardous Wastes Policy
ECCE: Music and Social Justice
ECCE: American Musics
ECCE: The Changing American Family and Public Policy
Employment Discrimination Law
Government Regulations and Administrative Law
Media Law And Ethics
Comparative Philosophy of Religion
Globalization and the Future of Democracy
Marxist Philosophy: Past, Present, Future
Moral Values in Political Philosophy
Social Philosophy
ECCE: Sexual Orientation and Public Policy
ECCE: Sexuality, Law, and Politics
The American Jury
Philosophy of Law
ECCE: Introduction to Comparative Politics
ECCE: Introduction to International Relations
Legislative Politics
Public Opinion
Illinois Government and Politics
The American Presidency
American Political Behavior
Political Parties and Interest Groups
Policy Analysis and Implementation
Appellate Advocacy: Moot Court
The Supreme Court and Judicial Politics
The American Constitution and Civil Liberties
Environmental Law
National Security Issues and the U.S. Constitution
Law and Inequality
ECCE: Democracy and Democratic Theory
Globalization and the Future of Democracy
Marxist Philosophy: Past, Present, Future
Postmodern Theory: Politics and Possibility
Empirical Political Analysis
The Politics of Reproduction
The Politics of Prosecution
ECCE: Global Social Change and Transnational Movements
International Law and Organizations
International Political Economy
ECCE: Latin American Politics
Terrorism and Public Policy
The Law of Military Conflict
American Foreign Policy
International Politics of the Middle East
Russian Politics
National Model United Nations
Model United Nations
ECCE: Introduction to Women and Gender Studies
Understanding Cultures
Human Evolution: Biological and Cultural
ECCE: Women and Work in India and the US
ECCE: Music and Social Justice
ECCE:Introduction to the Barrio
ECCE: Sexual Orientation and Public Policy
ECCE: Sexuality, Law, and Politics
Sociocultural Theories
Law and Inequality
ECCE: Culture, Health, and Power
Sociology of Organizations
ECCE: Culture and Education
ECCE: Immigrants, Public Opinion, and Public Policy
ECCE: Global Social Stratification
Family Law
Women in Political Movements: A Cross-Cultural Perspective
ECCE: Global Social Change and Transnational Movements
Sociology of Mental Health/Illness
Religion, Society, and the Individual
ECCE: Women and Work in India and the US
Working Class and Poor Women
ECCE: Sexual Orientation and Public Policy
ECCE: Sexuality, Law, and Politics
ECCE: Sex, Gender, and Popular Culture
ECCE: Women & Criminal Justice
ECCE: Black Women in Film History
Culture, Diversity, and Social Work
Law and Inequality
Family Law
Women in American Law
Employment Discrimination Law
ECCE: History of the Family
The Politics of Reproduction
Language3
ECCE: Multicultural American Novels
ECCE: African American Popular Fiction
Visual Storytelling and Reporting
Marketing Communications
Introduction to Interpersonal/Organizational Communication
Introduction to Mass Media
Computer-Mediated Interpersonal Communication
Interpersonal Communication
Small Group Communication
Dating and Relating
Organizational Communication
Introduction to Linguistics
Non-Fiction Writing
Literary Study and Research
Rhetoric and Composing Theories
Creative Writing Poetry
Writing Essays and Reviews
The Theory and Practice of Composition and Rhetoric in the American University
Rhetoric and Composition in Digital Media
Topics in Composition or Linguistics
European Literature: Ancient Greek and Biblical Motives, 1880-Present
Chaucer and His Era
Milton
Modern British Literature
Contemporary British Literature
Creative Writing: Nonfiction
Writing and the Environment
Spanish for Public Affairs
Spanish for Business
Spanish for Healthcare
Spanish for Communication
Spanish for Educators
Managerial Communication Skills
Negotiation
Report Writing For Managers
Critical and Persuasive Writing for Journalists
Critical Thinking
Logic
Philosophy of Language
Nature3
Any 300 or 400 level ASP, BIO, CHE, or CLS course
ECCE: Global Change in Local Places
ECCE: Evolution and Creationism
Fundamentals of Geographic Information Systems
Fundamentals of Remote Sensing
World Environmental Thought
American Environmental History
Environmental Law
Environmental Economics
ECCE: Environmental Sociology
Ecological Issues
Aquatic Ecology
Biology Of Water Pollution
Environmental Chemistry
Sustainable Food Systems
Our Changing Climate
Paleoecology
Water Resources and Society
Environmental Geology
ECCE: Global Evironmental Health
ECCE: Addiction
ECCE: Monsters, Medicine, and Myths
Environmental Toxicology
ECCE: Chemicals and the Citizen
ECCE: Emerging Diseases
ECCE: Crisis in Environmental Health
Philosophy and Animals
Animals and Human Civilization
Perspectives on Human Nature
Philosophy of Science
Introduction to Metaphysics and Epistemology
Work3
Any 300 or 400 level ACC, BUS, CSC, MGT, or MKT course
Law and Legal Processes
ECCE: Policing In America
Correctional Systems
Physical Evidence Processing
Statistics for Criminal Justice
Critical Incident Resources and Response
Forensic Evidence in Crim Law
Organizational Crime
Investigative Concepts and Analysis
Multimedia Reporting
Introduction to Radio
Introduction to Public Relations
Feature Writing
Editing
Electronic Media Management
Advanced Media Writing
Advertising
Advanced Visual Field Reporting
Writing For Public Relations
Interviewing
Communication Ethics
ECCE: Interdisciplinary Study of Work
ECCE: Creative Writing, Publishing, and Community
ECCE: Internship Applied Learning
ECCE: Undergraduate Prior Learning Portfolio Development
ECCE: Working for Women: Service-Learning and Gender Inequality
ECCE: Charity to Change
Social Responsibility and Leadership Development Capstone
ECCE: Social Change and Leadership
Occupational Safety and Health Policy
Total Hours28-40
1

This requirement may be satisfied using 300 and 400 level subject area courses the student has taken.

2

There are no classroom meetings for these courses. Students sign independent study contracts with faculty sponsors.

 

Online Students Admission Requirements

Entrance to the online program is selective and the number of students admitted each semester is limited. Applicants must have completed two semesters of college-level composition courses to be considered for admission. Questions about availability should be directed to the program coordinator.

Before an admission decision can be made, a prospective student must complete the application process:

  • Submit the UIS admission application, including signature sheet and application fee.

  • Send transcripts from all colleges or universities attended to the UIS Office of Admissions.

  • Submit a written statement (described below).

The statement plays a major role in admission to the online degree. It should be approximately two pages and should reflect junior-level college writing skills.

The statement should include:

  • A clear, concise statement of academic and/or professional goals.

  • Why a non-traditional, interdisciplinary program is the pathway to these goals.

  • A discussion of things that the applicant has been taught outside of an academic environment.

  • A discussion of online and/or technical skills.

  • A discussion of the skills and/or resources that the applicant possesses which will help him/her to succeed as an online student, as well as the challenges that may interfere with that success (e.g., time management, access to a computer and the Internet, or other factors).

Liberty Studies Minor

The Liberty Studies minor is a course of study focusing on the foundations, meanings, and implications of what it is to be free. It poses the fundamental question of “What can I do with my life?” It questions the power of institutions and the legitimacy of the constraints they impose. It explores freedom and liberty from multiple perspectives, including minorities and women in our own culture, and indigenous people of other times and places. Liberty Studies examines the costs and benefits of free human interaction, the need of naturally social animals to be left alone, and ultimately wrestles with the questions of what freedom and liberty are and should be.

The Liberty Studies minor approaches the study of liberty in relation to three subject areas commonly addressed in the literature: economic activity, government, and cultural influences. The study of these three areas is integrated both in how individual courses relate to each other individually and are tied together by the required courses. This minor can be taken on campus or online.

Requirements of the Minor

Students must take LIS 211 and either PHI 341 or PHI 441. Then students must take one course in each of the following three categories:

  1. Liberty and Commerce
  2. Liberty and Authority
  3. Liberty and Culture
     
Required Courses
LIS 211Liberty Studies3
PHI 341Ethics3
or PHI 441 Moral Theory
Select one course from each of the three categories listed below:10-11
Liberty and Commerce
Philosophy of Business
Free Market Philosophies
Rationality and Moral Choice
Liberty and Authority
ECCE: Civil Rights Movement of the Twentieth Century
Intellectual Origins of the American Revolution
Liberty Struggles
Social Philosophy
Liberty and Culture
Individualism and Self-Reliance in America
History of Modern Philosophy
American Society
Total Hours16-17

Social Responsibility and Leadership Development Minor

The Social Responsibility and Leadership Development minor is an interdisciplinary program that includes both theoretical and experiential components. The three core courses will be taught on a rotating basis (a minimum of one core course per semester including summer) online. The two electives can be taken online or on campus depending on how they are offered and the needs of the student. The major objective of the program is to educate students for and about social responsibility and leadership and to help them acquire leadership positions in their community and profession. The minor complements a wide variety of academic programs, such as business, management, and accounting; political science and legal studies; communication; environmental studies; sociology/anthropology; criminology and criminal justice; women and gender studies; African American studies; health professions; etc. Any prerequisites or course restrictions on courses taken as electives for the minor will be honored.

Required Core Courses
IPL 210Introduction to Leadership Theory and Practice3
IPL 361Social Responsibility and Leadership Development Capstone3
IPL 362ECCE: Social Change and Leadership3
Two Electives 16-8
Total Hours15-17
1

Two Electives (six - eight hours) can, but do not have to be in the student’s major. Students must request approval from the Social Responsibility and Leadership Development advisor for elective courses. In the case where courses are outside IPL courses, the SRLD advisor will consult with the chair of the appropriate academic program for approval. 

Degree Program Program Type Dept Application Materials and Admission Criteria Prerequisite Course Requirements Department ADM Review Dept Conditional Admits Dept Appeal Process
Liberal Studies BAOn campus*No additional admission requirements beyond the general UIS criteria; however, a written request to the department is required to enter the majorN/AN/AN/AN/A
Liberal Studies BAOnlineA written statement including the following:

*Clear, concise academic and/or professional goals

*Why a non-traditional, interdisciplinary program is the pathway to these goals

*A discussion of things that the applicant has been taught outside of an academic environment

*A discussion of online and/or technical skills

*Discussion of the skills and/or resources that the applicant possesses that will help them to succeed as an online student, as well as the challenges that may interfere with their success (including time management, access to a computer and the Internet, or other factors)
*Applicants must have completed at least 30 hours of transfer credit prior to admission into the online program

*The department encourages applicants to the online program to have completed Illinois General Education requirements before applying

*Online applicants must have successfully completed at least two semesters of freshman-level composition for admission into the program
Online Program CoordinatorN/AN/A

Courses

LIS 101. The Studio Age: Our Hollywood Heritage. 3 Hours.

This course is a survey of the Studio Age of Hollywood movies from 1929 to 1948 emphasizing the shared roles of corporations, artists, and audiences in the creation of our film heritage, as well as how this heritage is reflected in contemporary culture. Topics include: studio history, film vocabulary, genres. Course Information: This course fulfills a general education requirement at UIS in the area of Freshman Seminar and a general education requirement at UIS in the area of Humanities.

LIS 107. Globalization and Power. 3 Hours.

The history of world cultures with a focus on marginalized groups on the periphery of civilization. The course is broken into four units: (1) The Inuit, (2) The Faroe Islands, (3) South Africa, and (4) Uncontacted Tribes. Course Information: Same as HIS 107. This course fulfills a general education requirement at UIS in the areas of Comparative Societies Social Sciences.

LIS 211. Liberty Studies. 3 Hours.

What is liberty and why would we want it? This course is an examination of the meanings and foundations of liberty. Philosophical and economic methods are used to differentiate different types of liberty and the implications these have for addressing current issues and events. Course Information: This course fulfills a general education requirement at UIS in the area of Humanities or in Social and Behavioral Science.

LIS 244. Literary Heroines. 3 Hours.

This course will examine the literary works which have as main characters female personalities such as Medea, Antigone, Anna Karenina, Eva Luna, Isabelle Archer and others. Course Information: This course fulfills a general education requirement at UIS in the area of Humanities.

LIS 301. Self-Directed Learning. 4 Hours.

Introduction to the liberal studies program. Focuses on the skills, knowledge, and attitudes necessary to become a self-directed, autonomous learner. Topics include an examination of collegiate education philosophy, theory, and practice; dynamics of power; self-assessment; goal-setting; designing effective learning experiences; documenting and evaluating independent learning; organizing learning resources; and designing a liberal studies curriculum. To be taken as the first course after declaring the LIS major. Course Information: Prerequisite: LIS 301 must be completed and the degree plan accepted by the LIS program before enrolling in additional course work towards the major. Credit/No Credit grading only.

LIS 315. Individualism and Self-Reliance in America. 3 Hours.

This course examines the nature of American individualism and self-reliance. Students will think about the relationship of the individual to society, and whether such ideals as "frontier individualism" or Jeffersonian self-reliance are applicable today. Topics include republicanism, the Industrial revolution, mass society, big business, and the growth of government.

LIS 319. Philosophy of Business. 3 Hours.

What you believe about business affects both your choice of career path and your opinion on business ethics and regulation. Taking a multi-disciplinary approach and examining business in history, philosophy, management theory, and literature, this course is meant for both business majors interested in humanities related to their discipline, and humanities majors wishing to learn more about business.

LIS 325. ECCE: Latina/o USA. 4 Hours.

Introduction to the study of Mexican, Puerto Rican, Cuban, Dominican, and Central/South American communities in the U.S. Main themes are immigration, identity, gender and racial constructions, labor, education, and activism. Other topics include demographic trends, political participation, and relations with origin communities in Latin America and the Caribbean. Course Information: Same as GBL 325, HIS 325, PSC 465, and SOA 325. This course fulfills an Engaged Citizenship Common Experience requirement at UIS in the area of U.S. Communities. 420188.

LIS 342. Conducting Liberal Studies Research. 3 Hours.

This course is designed for the Liberal Studies student who wants to develop skills in critical thinking by conducting web-based scholarly research. The topic will be chosen by the student and will relate to the learning needs identified in the student's degree proposal. Though a research paper will not be expected as the outcome of this course, the course is structured to prepare you for writing a scholarly research paper. Course Information: Credit/No Credit grading only. Prerequisite: LIS majors who have completed LIS 301.

LIS 344. ECCE: Serving up Art. 3 Hours.

A learning opportunity for students interested in exploring both art and service. This online learning class will ask participants to collectively explore the question: "What is art and why does it matter?" Students survey arts organizations in a community and implement a 60-hour service learning experience. Course Information: No prerequisites. This course fulfills an Engaged Citizenship Common Experience requirement at UIS in the area of ECCE Engagement Experience.

LIS 360. Special Topics in Liberal Studies. 4 Hours.

Exploration of topics relating to Boyer Categories. Meets Liberal Studies elective requirement.

LIS 362. ECCE: Interdisciplinary Study of Work. 4 Hours.

This course is a study of how work determines culture and individual identity. Course Information: Same as ENG 362. Prerequisite: ENG 101 and ENG 102. This course fulfills an Engaged Citizenship Common Experience requirement at UIS in the area of U.S. Communities.

LIS 366. ECCE: European Cinema. 4 Hours.

The purpose of this course is to introduce students to the art of European cinema and its variety. Students will watch and examine a variety of European films - French, German, Italian, Scandinavian, Chinese and Turkish made by Chinese and Turkish directors who live in France and Italy respectively - and will study them from a variety of artistic, literary, and technical perspective. The majority of the films touch on general issues of human existence - love, hate, death, meaning of life - even when the films are of historical or comical nature. All films are in foreign languages with sub-titles. Course Information: Same as ART 366 and ENG 323. This course fulfills an Engaged Citizenship Common Experience requirement at UIS in the area of Global Awareness.

LIS 380. Exploration of Learning Resources. 1-8 Hours.

Independent study through exploration of a topic within liberal studies or directly related to the student's degree plan. A journal of the exploration process, a comprehensive resources inventory, and demonstration of learning (a major product) are required. To be taken as described in individual degree plans. Course Information: Credit/No Credit grading only. May be repeated to a maximum of 8 hours. Prerequisite: LIS 301 and program acceptance of degree plan.

LIS 411. Liberty Struggles. 4 Hours.

The liberty struggles examines social movements and armed conflicts that have included, as part of their stated aims, the increase or enhancement of liberty and freedom for an oppressed population. The course uses a community organizing framework to understand historical and current liberty struggles. Topics covered include peasant revolts, revolutions in the Americas and France, the abolitionist movement, the civil rights movement, ant-communism, and anti-imperialism.

LIS 417. Free Market Philosophies. 3 Hours.

We examine arguments for laissez faire capitalism and how different philosophical foundations lead to different public policy recommendations. Arguments between different free market theories are critically examined. Issues include government legitimacy, the nature of the market, morality and selfishness, and the private provision of what are typically considered government services.

LIS 421. Baseball: An Interdisciplinary Approach. 4 Hours.

This course looks at baseball in the United States through an interdisciplinary approach that will include economics, history, politics, technology, and culture. Rather than trying to provide a sweeping historical analysis, specific turning points in baseball as a commercialized business will be studied and used to generate the approach. Course Information: No prerequisite is required.

LIS 424. ECCE: Ancient Sport and Spectacle. 4 Hours.

This course will study the beginnings of sport in the Greco-Roman world and its transformation throughout the centuries to our days. It will also examine how sport became a vehicle for the ideological and political expression, was associated with class, gender, violence, nationalism, and ethnicity, and how it has been appropriated and reinterpreted in modern times. Course Information: Same as HIS 424. This course fulfills an Engaged Citizenship Common Experience requirement at UIS in the area of Global Awareness.

LIS 431. The Beatles: Popular Music and Society. 4 Hours.

The purpose of this course is to develop an understanding of not only the Beatles and their musical accomplishments, but also the impact they had and are having on popular music and society. Toward that end, we will listen to their music, watch videos of their work and hear their comments on that work, as well as read some of the best writing on the Beatles. Course Information: Same as COM 459.

LIS 432. ECCE: Expatriate Paris. 4 Hours.

This course will introduce you to artists, writers, and poets who created their works away from their homeland and you will see how their works influenced or did not influence the culture of the country in which they lived and created. You will learn to look at works of art and see them as well as to be able to read a literary work and to understand its depth and complexity, as well as improve your analytical and writing abilities and research and writing skills. Course Information: Same as ART 432 and ENG 426. This course fulfills an Engaged Citizenship Common Experience requirement at UIS in the area of Global Awareness.

LIS 442. ECCE: International Women Writers. 4 Hours.

This course examines literary works written by women writers, poets, literary critics and philosophers from around the world. Course Information: Same as WGS 442. This course fulfills an Engaged Citizenship Common Experience requirement at UIS in the area of Global Awareness.

LIS 447. ECCE: Symbolist Movement in Europe: 1850 - 1920. 3 Hours.

To study a movement in art and literature, spanning the latter part of the 19th and the beginning of the 20th centuries. Different in its national emphasis on artistic and literary issues, the movement was internationally anchored in similar philosophical precepts. This course will foreground the predominant themes informing such diverse works as those by the English Pre-Raphaelites, the French Symbolists and Decadents, German, Scandinavian, Turkish and Russian artists and writers. This course is of a comparative and interdisciplinary nature. Course Information: Same as ART 431 and ENG 424. This course fulfills an Engaged Citizenship Common Experience requirement at UIS in the area of Global Awareness.

LIS 451. Senior Seminar. 3 Hours.

Includes a symposium on applying principles of integration and autonomy explored in LIS 301 to the learning experiences of the degree program. Students prepare a paper integrating their learning experiences. Students who choose to do an honors thesis may prepare a proposal for LIS 471. Should be taken as the final course prior to graduation. Course Information: Credit/No Credit grading only. Prerequisite: LIS 301.

LIS 458. ECCE: Memoirs Across Cultures. 4 Hours.

This is a course about reading, analyzing, writing, and redefining memoirs. The autobiographical writings on the reading list look at the inner life of the authors as well as the outer events. We will examine how historical context, socio-political climate, cultural memories, and identities are represented in these personal narratives, and in the process redefine the genre of memoirs. Course Information: This course fulfills an Engaged Citizenship Common Experience requirement at UIS in the area of Global Awareness.

LIS 460. Special Topics in Liberal Studies. 4 Hours.

Exploration of topics relating to Boyer Categories. Meets Liberal Studies elective requirement.

LIS 471. Honors Thesis. 2 Hours.

Design, development, and completion of a thesis, which must be completed during the term in which the student expects to graduate. To be taken as described in individual degree plans.

LIS 499. Independent Study: Tutorial. 1-8 Hours.

Focus on readings or research on trends and current issues in the student's area of study. In consultation with faculty, students define topics integral to satisfying their self-assessed learning needs. To be taken as described in individual degree plans. Course Information: Prerequisite: LIS 301 and program acceptance of degree plan. Credit/No Credit grading preferred, but grading allowed at the student's request and faculty sponser's discretion. May be repeated to a maximum of 8 hours. Restricted to Liberal Studies.