English

Bachelor of Arts
B.A. in English Online
Undergraduate Minor
Master of Arts

Graduate Certificate

http://www.uis.edu/englishmodernlanguages/
Email: eng@uis.edu
Office Phone: (217) 206-6779
Office Location: UHB 3050

Our Mission:
As a department in a liberal arts university, we seek to educate students in the humanistic endeavor of reading, writing, and studying texts in a variety of genres from across cultures and times. We want our students to become successful humanists who can effectively analyze writing and participate in the creation of knowledge and texts. Therefore, we view composition and literary study as indelibly linked. Within the structure of our curriculum and within our individual courses, we strive to show how reading imaginative and explicative texts is intimately connected to academic, civic, and creative writing.

The English Department at the University of Illinois at Springfield offers the Bachelor of Arts and Master of Arts degrees, and an undergraduate minor in English. Students may study a wide range of courses in British, American, and World Literature, and a variety of writing courses, as well as courses on different topics in literature and in specific genres.

The department offers courses that can help students prepare for teaching careers, for jobs as editors and writers, or for graduate work at the master's or doctoral level. UIS students can enroll as English majors or minors by taking course work in a physical classroom or online. Campus-based courses typically meet one or two times weekly for several hours at the UIS campus in Springfield, Illinois.

Additionally, the Online English Program allows students to actively participate in dynamic, diverse, and interactive online learning communities and earn their degrees via the internet. The online format enables students to complete course work on their own time and at their own pace within the framework of the traditional semester using the latest networked information technologies. Online students are given access to educational resources, academic advisors, and other course-related materials.

Departmental Goals and Objectives

By the time students graduate they should:

  • Write with confidence, precision, and an awareness of audience.
  • Perform sophisticated analysis of diverse literary texts in a range of mediums, including visual and multimedia.
  • Conduct professional research on a variety of academic, social, and cultural questions.
  • Recognize the diversity of human experience in its many forms of expression.
  • Create cutting edge digital texts using a range of technologies.
  • Take an active role in shaping the future of literature and culture.
 

The Bachelor's Degree

The B.A. in English prepares students for a life appreciating the power and beauty of language. It also prepares students for a variety of careers in many sectors, including Education, Business, Law, and Healthcare, through a focus on creative, cultural, and critical thinking skills. When an English major graduates, (s)he has the skills and opportunities to excel in almost any field. 

Advising

All English majors or minors are assigned academic advisors. Academic advisors assist students in developing appropriate, individualized courses of study. Students may choose a different academic advisor at any time to ensure they are fulfilling all degree requirements. Students should consult with academic advisors each semester and especially before enrolling for their final semester. Doing otherwise could result in delaying progress toward graduation. Please note that students pursuing teaching licensure must consult regularly with the Teacher Education Program (TEP) faculty liaison in the Department of English and Modern Languages as well as with the academic advisor in the Teacher Education Program during their entire course of study.

NOTE about ECCE Courses:

As general education courses, most ECCE courses may not be used to fulfill requirements for the English major or minor. Only ENG 368 will be allowed to fulfill a requirement for the English major.

Transfer Policy

The department will assess the records of incoming transfer students to determine an appropriate degree plan. This plan may include taking lower-division classes to prepare students for the rigor of upper-division coursework.  Requests for transfer credit for upper-division course work will be considered on a case-by-case basis.

Grading Policy

Faculty members assign course grades according to campus policy and the grading criteria of each individual course. Students must complete ENG 303 with a C or better to proceed to 400-level course work.

Honors in English

In order to be eligible for admission to the English Honors Program, students must have:

  • Completed 72 credit hours towards their B.A.;
  • Completed Research Methods in English with a full B or better;
  • A 3.50 overall GPA at UIS;
  • A 3.60 GPA in English.

Students who meet these eligibility requirements can apply to be admitted to the Department Honors Program by submitting a proposal (200-250 words) to the department chair that outlines the honors project (s)he hopes to complete in ENG 498 Honors Project with a faculty mentor from the English Department. The submission deadline is March 1 for fall graduation and October 1 for spring and summer graduation. Students should apply for admission no later than their second-to-last semester. In order to receive the honors designation, a student must complete ENG 498 with an A, maintain a 3.5 overall GPA at UIS at the time of graduation, and maintain a 3.6 GPA in English at the time of graduation.

Degree Requirements for On-Campus and Online Majors

Please note that online or on-ground majors who have been admitted as juniors will follow the curriculum for the upper-division (300- and 400-level) courses only.

Foundation Requirements
ENG 109Introduction to Linguistics3
ENG 137Introduction to Literature3
ENG 139Introduction to English Studies Lab1
ENG 152Introduction to World Literature3
ENG 241Early British Literature3
ENG 242British Literature Since 16003
ENG 245Early American Literature3
ENG 246American Literature-1865 to the Present3
ENG 272Introduction to Creative Writing3
Core Requirements
ENG 303Research Methods in English Studies3
ENG 304Research Methods Lab 11
ENG 365Children's and Young Adult Literature (Core Classes (Freshman Level))3
ENG 371Creative Writing Poetry3
ENG 372Fiction Writing3
ENG 409Rhetoric and Composition in Digital Media3
ENG 466Digital Technologies in English Studies3
ENG 489Capstone3
Elective Requirements
Select one of the following genre courses:3
Introduction to Poetry
Introduction to Fiction
Introduction to Drama
Introduction to Film
Select one of the following editing courses:3-4
Professional Writing
ECCE: Creative Writing, Publishing, and Community
Editing
Select one of the following writing courses:3
Non-Fiction Writing
Writing in New Media
Select two (2) 300-level ENG Courses6-7
Select two (2) 400-level ENG Courses6-7
Total Hours68-71

1 Transfer students only.

Degree Plan

*Listed below is a SUGGESTED Degree Plan.  For OFFICIAL program information, please refer to the catalog content above and consult your academic advisor.

The following is a four-year degree plan that presumes a first-year student entering the university during the fall. Transfer students, especially those who enter at a spring semester, will need to adjust expectations. To graduate from UIS, a student must have accumulated 120 credit hours. There is sufficient room in the degree plan for an English major to complete a minor from another program and still graduate in four years.

Year 1
Fall Hours
ENG 101Rhetoric and College Writing3
ENG 109Introduction to Linguistics3
Freshman Seminar (ENG preferred)3
Oral Communication3
Math3
 Hours15
Spring  
ENG 102College Writing and Civic Engagement3
ENG 137Introduction to Literature3
ENG 139Introduction to English Studies Lab1
ENG 152Introduction to World Literature3
Social Science3
Math3
 Hours16
Year 2
Fall  
ENG 241Early British Literature3
ENG 245Early American Literature3
Social Science3
200-Level Introductory Genre3
Life Science3,4
 Hours15-16
Spring  
ENG 242British Literature Since 16003
ENG 246American Literature-1865 to the Present3
ENG 272Introduction to Creative Writing3
Speaker Series1
Physical Science3,4
 Hours13-14
Year 3
Fall  
ENG 303Research Methods in English Studies3
ENG 304Research Methods Lab1
ENG 365Children's and Young Adult Literature3
ENG 372Fiction Writing3
300-Level Literary Genre3
 Hours13
Spring  
ENG 371Creative Writing Poetry3
300-Level Writing Course (Creative Non-Fiction or Writing in New Media)3
300-Level Editing Course3
300-Level Literary Genre3
 Hours12
Year 4
Fall  
400-Level Literary Topic Course3
ENG 466Digital Technologies in English Studies3
ENG 409Rhetoric and Composition in Digital Media3
ECCE U.S. Communities or Global Awareness3,4
 Hours12-13
Spring  
400-Level Literary Topic Course3
ENG 489Capstone3
ECCE Engaged Experience6
 Hours12
 Total Hours: 108-111

Online Degree

The Online English Program allows students to participate actively in dynamic, diverse, and interactive online learning communities and to complete their course work in their own time and at their own pace within the same semester time frame as on-ground courses. The online format enables them to complete course work using the latest networked information technologies for the same easy access to educational resources, advisors, and materials that on-campus students enjoy. If students are interested in TEP courses online, they should consult the English Department faculty liaison for TEP about the availability of online TEP courses.

  • A minimum of 30 successfully completed hours at the lower-division (preference granted to those applicants with 60 hours or an associate’s degree).

  • A cumulative grade point average of 3.0 or higher on a 4.0 scale.

  • Completion of two English Composition courses with a grade of C or better (grades of C- or lower will not be accepted).

  • Completion of two literature courses with a grade of C or better. (Historical surveys are preferred).

  • Completion of one creative writing course with a grade of C or better.

  • An application letter that addresses why the student wants to major in English at UIS, why online degree completion is preferred, and any context that may explain a circumstance that might warrant a waiver of GPA or course requirements listed above.

  • Access to the Internet.

  • Computer skills and systems needed to study online (See Online Learning Resources for Students @ uis.edu/colrs/students/).

Degree Plan

Please see the Bachelor's degree tab for the English major degree plan and course listings.

English Minor

The English minor is 13 hours. As indicated below, it consists of two core courses (four hours), one literature course (three hours), one writing or linguistics course (three hours), and one elective not used to fulfill any of the other categories (three hours). 

ENG 303Research Methods in English Studies3
ENG 304Research Methods Lab1
300- or 400-Level Writing or Linguistics Course3
300- or 400-Level Literature Course3
300- or 400- Level ENG Elective3
Total Hours13

If you are a TEP elementary candidate seeking the English minor for the Middle School English endorsement, see your TEP academic advisors in the English Department and in the Teacher Education Department about differences in course work requirements for the English minor.

Degree Program Program Type Dept Application Materials and Admission Criteria Prerequisite Course Requirements Department ADM Review Dept Conditional Admits Dept Appeal Process
English BAOn campusNo additional admission requirements beyond the general UIS criteriaN/AN/AN/AN/A
English BAOnlineAdditional Application Materials:

*An application letter that addresses why the student wants to major in English at UIS, why online degree completion is preferred, and any context that may explain a circumstance that might warrant a waiver of GPA or course requirements.

*Access to the Internet

*Computer skills and systems needed to study online (See Online Learning Resources for Students at uis.edu/colrs/students/).
*Minimum of 30 successfully completed hours at the lower- division (preference granted to those applicants with 60 hours or an associate’s degree).

*Cumulative grade point average of 3.0 or higher on a 4.0 scale.

*Completion of two English Composition courses with a grade of C or better (grades of C- or lower will not be accepted).

*Completion of one creative writing course with a grade of C or better (grades of C- or lower will not be accepted).

*Completion of two literature courses with a grade of C or better (grades of C- or lower will not be accepted).
YesYesContact department chair.

Courses

ENG 091. Critical Reading. 3 Hours.

This introductory course is intended to build fluency so that students can successfully locate, read, and analyze academic materials from a broad range of disciplines, including the sciences, social sciences, and humanities. Course Information: This course is not designated for transfer credit, nor will credit be given toward a degree.

ENG 101. Rhetoric and College Writing. 3 Hours.

Explores the intricate connections among reading, thinking, and writing. Students will use writing as an intellectual tool for the production of new ideas and new ways of seeing the world. The course emphasizes rhetorical invention, audience awareness, critical analysis, and revision. Course Information: This course fulfills a general education requirement at UIS in the area of Written Communication.

ENG 102. College Writing and Civic Engagement. 3 Hours.

Explores analytical and argumentative writing written for the public sphere. Students will develop their abilities to articulate rhetorical strategies found in texts and to produce carefully constructed arguments in multiple genres and for multiple audiences. The course emphasizes invention and revision strategies. Course Information: Prerequisite: ENG 101, or CAP 111, or equivalent with a grade of C or better. This course fulfills a general education requirement at UIS in the area of Written Communication. (IAI Code:C1 901 R).

ENG 109. Introduction to Linguistics. 3 Hours.

This course covers foundational concepts such as how we define language in contrast with animal communication systems and the variations in human language systems. It also covers the essential parts of human linguistic codes and the core linguistic areas of phonetics and phonology, morphology, syntax, semantics and pragmatics. We explore a few of the central debates concerning psycholinguistic and neurological evidence for humans? innate capacity for language and issues in language. Course Information: This course fulfills a general education requirement at UIS in the area of Social and Behavioral Sciences.

ENG 111. Seminar: Novel Mysteries Revealed. 3 Hours.

Emphasizes baccalaureate-skill development through the intensive, close reading of a single novel. Course Information: This course fulfills a general education requirement at UIS in the area of Freshman Seminar and a general education requirement at UIS in the area of Humanities.

ENG 112. Seminar: Building Medieval Giants: Castles and Cathedrals. 3 Hours.

Emphasizes baccalaureate-skill development through the close reading of a novel and participating in research, activities, and presentations on the science and lore of castle (and cathedral) building. Ideally, we will also visit the site of a medieval castle currently being built in the U.S. (in the Ozarks) using the materials and techniques of the middle ages, and talk with the planners, builders, and artisans involved in the project. An alternate assignment is provided for students who are unable to go on this trip. Course Information: This course fulfills a general education requirement at UIS in the area of Freshman Seminar and a general education requirement at UIS in the area of Humanities.

ENG 113. Video Games and Gaming. 3 Hours.

Freshman seminar focusing on the study of video games in interactive cultural texts. In addition to the practical goals common to all freshman seminars, students will utilize gameplay and traditional academic skills in writing, research, analysis and presentation to demonstrate critical literacy skills for college and life. Course Information: This course fulfills a general education requirement at UIS in the area of Freshman Seminar or at UIS in the area of Humanities.

ENG 114. Real Life Game of Thrones. 4 Hours.

Students will read and research topics focusing on the series of conflicts in England during the 1400's known as the War of the Roses and will also see how one author, George R. R. Martin, used the events as a starting point for the novels and the television series entitled "Game of Thrones" by watching and analyzing video clips that correspond to the actual events. Course Information: This course fulfills a general education requirement at UIS in the area of Freshman Seminar or in the area of Humanities.

ENG 132. Introduction to Poetry. 3 Hours.

Introductory course concentrating on the basic elements of poetry. Focus will be upon gaining the technical vocabulary to complete close readings, to write tightly reasoned argumentative essays, and to appreciate the communicative art of poetry. Course Information: Prerequisite: ENG 101 and ENG 102 or equivalent. This course fulfills a general education requirement at UIS in the area of Humanities.

ENG 133. Introduction to Fiction. 3 Hours.

Open to all undergraduates, ENG 252 is a first course for English majors and fulfills a humanities requirement for students in other fields. Introduces fiction as a literary genre. Focus is on short stories and novels of various cultures and periods. Course Information: This course fulfills a general education requirement at UIS in the area of Humanities (IAI Code: H3 901).

ENG 137. Introduction to Literature. 3 Hours.

Introduction to Literature offers a foundation for understanding literature. Students learn critical reading skills for poetry, drama, short fiction, and the novel. Students learn skills for interpreting fiction, including current forms, by applying classic analytic methods to evolving forms. Course Information: This course fulfils a general education requirement at UIS in the area of Humanities.

ENG 138. Introduction to Drama. 3 Hours.

This is an introductory course concentrating on the literary history and basic elements of drama. We will focus upon gaining the technical vocabulary to complete close readings, to write tightly reasoned argumentative essays, and to appreciate the communicative art of drama. Course Information: This course fulfills a general education requirement at UIS in the area of Humanities.

ENG 139. Introduction to English Studies Lab. 1 Hour.

This course is restricted to English majors who are taking ENG 137 concurrently or who have already passed ENG 137. The purpose of the course is to provide an introduction to the sub-disciplines in English Studies, including literary study, creative writing, rhetoric/composition, and linguistics, to sharpen writing and research skills in the discipline, and to introduce students to careers associated with the field.

ENG 152. Introduction to World Literature. 3 Hours.

Designed to introduce students to literature from around the world, this course will draw attention to the diversities and commonalities of literary cultures. Course Information: No prerequisites. This course fulfills a general education requirement at UIS in the area of Comparative Societies Humanities.

ENG 231. Survey of African American Literature. 3 Hours.

This course surveys the great diversity in African American literature from the colonial era up to the present. Special attention is given to the vernacular tradition and its effects on the creative production of Black people in the U. S. although some Caribbean and African authors may be read. Various interdisciplinary and critical frameworks will be presented to facilitate comprehension and discussion of course material, including audio/visual selections. Course Information: Same as AAS 261. This course fulfills a general education requirement at UIS in the area of Humanities.

ENG 232. Calabash: Caribbean Literature and Culture. 3 Hours.

Surveys the great diversity in Caribbean cultural expressions with a focus on literature, music and film. Course Information: Same as AAS 262. This course fulfills a general education requirement at UIS in the area of Humanities.

ENG 234. Introduction to Film. 3 Hours.

Introductory course concentrating on the basic elements of film study. Students will gain the technical vocabulary necessary to complete analyses of narrative, documentary, and avant-garde film. Course Information: Prerequisite: CAP 111 or ENG 102 completed with a C or better. This course fulfills a general education requirement at UIS in the area of Humanities.

ENG 235. Introduction to American Literature. 3 Hours.

Open to all undergraduates, this course introduces American fiction, poetry, non-fiction, and drama by authors representing diverse cultures, races, and regions, and offers an overview of American literary history. Course Information: This course fulfills a general education requirement at UIS in the area of Humanities.

ENG 236. Introduction to British Literature. 3 Hours.

Open to all undergraduates, this course introduces the major periods, genres, authors, and works of British literary history. Course Information: This course fulfills a general education requirement at UIS in the area of Humanities.

ENG 241. Early British Literature. 3 Hours.

This course is an introduction to major works of British literature, including poetry, prose fiction, biography, essays, and drama, from the early Middle Ages to the early seventeenth century.

ENG 242. British Literature Since 1600. 3 Hours.

This course is the second semester of the introduction to major works of British literature, including poetry, prose fiction, biography, essays, and drama. It begins with a shift in poetic conventions and concerns of Elizabethan England. It ends with a consideration of the expanding reach of Anglophone literature, the impact of British imperialism, and tensions of a multicultural British polity in the early twenty-first century.

ENG 245. Early American Literature. 3 Hours.

Survey of American literature from contact through 1865, including texts from the colonial, revolutionary, and antebellum periods. Focus will be upon literary analysis and literary movements contextualized by American history and culture. Course Information: Prerequisite: ENG 101 and 102 (or equivalent). This course fulfills a general education requirement at UIS in the area of Humanities.

ENG 246. American Literature-1865 to the Present. 3 Hours.

American literature from a historical perspective, focusing on a selection of works published between 1865 and the present. Exploring the impact of social and cultural transformations on our national literature and working through literary movements while paying close attention to the development of ideas about gender, race region, and nation, as expressed in fiction, poetry, and drama.Course Information: This course fulfills a general education requirement at UIS in the area of Humanities.

ENG 271. Introduction to Writing Poetry - Sound, Sense, and Structure. 3 Hours.

Introductory creative-writing course encompassing instruction in writing original poetry. The course is workshop-based involving the production of multiple poems in a variety of forms as well as participation in a discourse community of poets and writers. Course Information: Prerequisite: Undergraduate standing. This course fulfills a general education requirement at UIS in the area of Visual, Creative, and Performing Arts.

ENG 272. Introduction to Creative Writing. 3 Hours.

Creative writing course that introduces students to techniques and processes of writing short stories, poetry, drama, and creative non-fiction. Course Information: This course fulfills a general education requirement at UIS in the area of Visual, Creative, and Performing Arts.

ENG 275. Advanced Composition. 3 Hours.

Advanced Composition offers you practice in writing for academic audiences. Particular attention is given to invention and revision strategies. The course emphasizes stylistic awareness, which includes the understanding of grammatical concepts and rules of punctuation. Course Information: Prerequisite: C or better in ENG 102.

ENG 301. Introduction to the Discipline. 4 Hours.

Introduction to the Discipline is designed to help English Majors master the fundamental skills required to succeed in the discipline: Knowledge of genres, close and analytic reading of literature, and writing about it in disciplinary appropriate discourse. Course Information: Prerequisite: C or better in ENG 102 or equivalent.

ENG 302. Introduction to Linguistics. 4 Hours.

This course covers foundational concepts such as how to define language and the differences between the human language systems and other animal communications. It introduces the essential components of the human linguistic codes and the core linguistic areas of phonetics and phonology, morphology, syntax, semantics and pragmatics. It also introduces several central debates concerning the psycholinguistic and neurolinguistic evidence for humans' innate capacity for language and related questions including dialect variation and the development of monolingual and multilingual speech communities. Throughout this overview, students will focus on real world applications and be given many opportunities to practice what they have learned. Course Information: Prerequisite: ENG 101 and ENG 102 or their equivalents.

ENG 303. Research Methods in English Studies. 3 Hours.

This course is designed to help English majors master the fundamental skills required to succeed in the discipline: knowledge of genres, close and analytical reading of literature, and writing about it in disciplinary appropriate discourse, including the integration of literary, historical, and cultural research. Course Information: Prerequisites: C or better in ENG 102 or equivalent.

ENG 304. Research Methods Lab. 1 Hour.

This course is restricted to transfer and online English majors who are taking ENG 303 concurrently or who have already passed ENG 303. The purpose of the course is to provide an introduction to the sub-disciplines in English Studies, including literary study, creative writing, rhetoric/composition, and linguistics, to sharpen writing and research skills in the discipline, and to introduce students to careers associated with the field.

ENG 308. Non-Fiction Writing. 3 Hours.

Individualized instruction in writing nonfiction.Course Information: Prerequisites: C in ENG 303.

ENG 309. Professional Writing. 3 Hours.

Principles of composition and rhetoric applied to the basic genres of scientific, technical, and business writing including the report, proposal, manual, and correspondence. Course Information: Prerequisites: C in ENG 303.

ENG 311. Literary Study and Research. 4 Hours.

For undergraduate majors early in their study. Introduction to basic bibliographic tools and critical perspectives on the study of literature and the major issues and controversies in the profession. Student portfolios and other means of assessment will be explained and initiated. ENG 311 constitutes the English program's assessment in the major at the entry level. Course Information: Prerequisite: C or better in ENG 201 or ENG 301. Restricted to ENG majors.

ENG 312. Rhetoric and Composing Theories. 4 Hours.

This course introduces students to the history and emergence of composition studies, as well as the theories and controversies that have defined the field. Course Information: Prerequisite: ENG 201 with a grade of` C or better. Grades of C- or lower will not be accepted. Restricted to ENG majors and minors.

ENG 320. Topics in World Literature I. 3 Hours.

Study of topics and themes regarding world literature and cultures. Topics vary. Course Information: Prerequisites: C in ENG 102 or equivalent.

ENG 321. ECCE: From China to Chinese America. 4 Hours.

This course exposes students to Chinese American literature, culture, and history. It also examines how traditional Chinese culture is transformed in the context of migration. The class reading includes literary works written by Chinese American authors that have attracted scholarly attention in both the United States and China. In addition, we shall read history and critical essays as well as view film and video clips to enhance the students' learning experience. The class discussion will focus on cross-cultural topics in Asian American Studies such as: the cross-dressing heroine Mulan, the mythology of the Monkey King, ethnic food and identity, multiethnic/multiracial families, to name only a few. Through examining Chinese American community's cultural heritage in China as well as its presence in American history and culture, students are expected to gain a comprehensive view of Chinese American literature and in the process to learn about cultural diversity within the United States. Course Information: This course fulfills an Engaged Citizenship Common Experience requirement at UIS in the area of Global Awareness.

ENG 323. ECCE: European Cinema. 4 Hours.

The purpose of this course is to introduce students to the art of European cinema and its variety. Students will watch and examine a variety of European films - French, German, Italian, Scandinavian, Chinese and Turkish made by Chinese and Turkish directors who live in France and Italy respectively - and will study them from a variety of artistic, literary, and technical perspective. The majority of the films touch on general issues of human existence - love, hate, death, meaning of life - even when the films are of historical or comical nature. All films are in foreign languages with sub-titles. Course Information: Same as ART 366 and LIS 366. This course fulfills an Engaged Citizenship Common Experience requirement at UIS in the area of Global Awareness.

ENG 324. ECCE: Contemporary African Literature. 4 Hours.

This course uses a variety of methods to link historical, cultural, and biographical information to the interpretation of African texts. Course Information: Same as AAS 324. This course fulfills an Engaged Citizenship Common Experience requirement at UIS in the area of Global Awareness.

ENG 325. ECCE: Reading Arab Pasts. 4 Hours.

The disciplines of history and literature have long been closely combined. Writing history necessitates the crafting of a narrative; likewise, literature can serve as a primary source through which we gain insights into history and culture, In this course, we will look at literary works originating from the Middle East in order to gain a deeper understanding of the culture and policies of the countries under study. Countries under consideration may vary from semester to semester. Course Information: Same as HIS 373.

ENG 330. Topics in American Literature I. 3 Hours.

Study of topics and themes regarding American literatures and cultures. Course Information: Topics vary. Prerequisites: C in ENG 102 or equivalent.

ENG 331. ECCE: Asian American Women. 4 Hours.

This course explores the complex nature of Asian-American literature to discover its diverse themes, foci, narrative strategies, and approaches to culture and history, with a particular focus on women. Course Information: Same as WGS 331. This course fulfills an Engaged Citizenship Common Experience requirement at UIS in the areas of Global Awareness.

ENG 332. Women Playwrights. 3 Hours.

Examination / analysis of plays by and about women, focusing primarily on US women playwrights. The course covers the intellectual, emotional, cultural, social, and political qualities of these plays and how they shed light on social issues involving women in the US - such as race, gender, sexual orientation, and social inequalities. Course Information: Same as THE 325 and WGS 332.

ENG 333. Contemporary American Novel. 3 Hours.

Major post-war novelists, including Bellow, Ellison, Erdrich, Morrison, and Vonnegut. Course Information: Prerequisites: C in ENG 303.

ENG 334. The American Novel, 1865-1915. 3 Hours.

Novels by such writers as Chopin, Dreiser, James, Twain, and Wharton. Course Information: Prerequisites: C in ENG 303.

ENG 337. ECCE: American Souths. 4 Hours.

This course focuses on tensions within the sub-regional enclaves of the South, including the Sea Island, the Caribbean, Appalachia, the "deep South," and a native American "outlaw" community in North Carolina. Sociological study of the South will be used to contextualize the reading and discussion of five novels that focus on the culture and social history of these communities. Course Information: This course fulfills an Engaged Citizenship Common Experience requirement at UIS in the areas of U.S. Communities.

ENG 340. ECCE: U.S. Communities: Topics in English Studies. 3 Hours.

Study of topics and themes regarding British literature and cultures. Course Information: Topics vary. Prerequisites: C in ENG 102 or equivalent.

ENG 342. Playing Shakespeare. 4 Hours.

A combination of survey and rehearsal of Shakespeare's works, along with practical applications for performance. Course work will include analysis of select Shakespeare plays, as well as rehearsals and performances of scenes and/or monologues from those plays. Course Information: Same as THE 477.

ENG 351. The British Victorian Novel. 3 Hours.

Introduction to the relationship that developed in the Victorian era between the novel and the dominant social issues of the period; focus is on such major novelists as Dickens, Eliot, Gaskell and Hardy. Course information: Prerequisites: C in ENG 102 or equivalent.

ENG 360. Topics in English Studies. 3 Hours.

Open to majors and non-majors, the course focuses on topics relevant to English Studies. Credit may be earned in several sections of 360, but students must study a different topic in each section. Course Information: Prerequisites: C in ENG 102 or equivalent.

ENG 362. ECCE: Interdisciplinary Study of Work. 4 Hours.

This course is a study of how work determines culture and individual identity. Course Information: Same as LIS 362. Prerequisite: ENG 101 and ENG 102. This course fulfills an Engaged Citizenship Common Experience requirement at UIS in the area of U.S. Communities.

ENG 365. Children's and Young Adult Literature. 3 Hours.

Books children read from when there was no "children's literature" up to modern books and evolving literary forms written with children and young adults in mind. Encompasses both literature and a social history of children and the family. Course information: Prerequisites: C in ENG 102 or equivalent.

ENG 366. ECCE: Story of Food. 3 Hours.

There is a powerful connection between food and the stories we tell about who we are and what we cherish. Yet our stories are shaped or constrained in ways we don?t always consider. This course begins by considering this problem of the ?food story? broadly with readings in fiction and non-fiction genres but narrows to focus on stories of food and identity in American culture, especially in regards to immigration, assimilation, social mobility and ambition. Course Information: This course fulfills an Engaged Citizenship Common Experience requirement at UIS in the area of U.S. Communities.

ENG 367. ECCE: Effective Tutoring Through Service-Learning. 3 Hours.

This course teaches students to tutor high school and college-level students with an emphasis on writing in face-to-face, online, one-to-one, and group tutoring sessions. The course will convene in three chronological formats: orientation of how to tutor, service-learning hours, and reflections on application of tutoring theories in the service-learning hours. Course Information: Same as IPL 378. This course fulfills an Engaged Citizenship Common Experience requirement at UIS in the area of Engagement Experience.

ENG 368. ECCE: Creative Writing, Publishing, and Community. 4 Hours.

Designed for students interested in multiple aspects of literary production (writing, editing, publishing, and teaching), this course will explore the position and social functions of creative writing at the national, regional, and local levels. We will pay particular attention to issues of race, class, gender, and sexual orientation. Course Information: This course fulfills an Engaged Citizenship Common Experience requirement at UIS in the area of U.S. Communities.

ENG 369. ECCE: Verbal Arts in the Community. 4 Hours.

Language structures the way that we speak, read, and write, and our social interactions as a whole. The verbal arts express a community's values and desires and provides a thread that weaves together its social fabric. We will investigate how that occurs. Course Information: This course fulfills an Engaged Citizenship Common Experience requirement at UIS in the area of Engagement Experience.

ENG 370. Topics in Creative Writing I. 3 Hours.

Study of topics and themes regarding the production of creative writing. Course Information : Topics vary. Prerequisites: C in ENG 102 or equivalent.

ENG 371. Creative Writing Poetry. 3 Hours.

This course builds upon the literary techniques and methods of analysis introduced in ENG 272, while providing a more comprehensive grounding on contemporary poetry. Round table workshops emphasize a critical, constructive treatment of student works-in-progress. Course Information: Prerequisites: C in ENG 102 or equivalent.

ENG 372. Fiction Writing. 3 Hours.

This course builds upon the literary techniques and methods of analysis introduced in ENG 272, and includes a more comprehensive grounding in contemporary fiction. Round table workshops emphasize a critical, constructive treatment of student works-in-progress. Course Information: Pre-requisites: C or better in ENG 272, a C or better in ENG 102.

ENG 373. Writing in New Media. 3 Hours.

Writing in New Media will provide students with a broad introduction to multiple digital contexts, writing strategies, digital literacies, and emergent technologies, providing a space for both analysis and production of digital texts. This course pays close attention to the ways in which writing is a collaborative, communicative, social act, grounding our explorations of technologies in rhetorical contexts.Course Information: Prerequisites: C or better in ENG 102 or CAP 115 or equivalent.

ENG 380. Introduction to Literary Genres. 3 Hours.

Introduces students to literary genres such as poetry, short fiction, creative non-fiction, and the novel. Students will read and write about a particular genre or a combination of them. Course Information: Prerequisite: C in ENG 102 or equivalent.

ENG 381. Graphic Novel. 3 Hours.

Examination of the format and content of the graphic novel with a focus on global context. Course Information: Prerequisites: C in ENG 102 or equivalent.

ENG 404. History of English Language. 3 Hours.

Study of the development of the sounds, vocabulary, and structure of English from earliest time to the present. Special attention given to American English. Course Information: Prerequisites: C in ENG 303.

ENG 406. Writing Essays and Reviews. 4 Hours.

The writing of essays and review of articles, books, film, and art using periodicals and magazines as models.

ENG 407. The Theory and Practice of Composition and Rhetoric in the American University. 4 Hours.

Examines the history of teaching college writing in American Universities from Classical and belletristic methods of the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries to current theories and practices influenced by postmodernism and cultural criticism.

ENG 409. Rhetoric and Composition in Digital Media. 3,4 Hours.

Students will learn how to make texts cohere, communicate, and flow logically within digital media and to create complementary links to print media. The course will complement skills in the creative process developed in the 470 series. Course Information: Fulfills an elective requirement for the B.A. and is a core class for the digital publishing concentration of the English M.A. Prerequisites: C in ENG 303.

ENG 410. Topics in Composition or Linguistics. 3 Hours.

Advanced study of topics and themes regarding composition and rhetoric and /or linguistics. Course Information: Topics vary. Prerequisites: C in ENG 303.

ENG 420. Topics in World Literature II. 3 Hours.

Advanced study of topics and themes regarding world literatures and cultures. Course Information: Topics vary. Prerequisites: C in ENG 303.

ENG 424. ECCE: Symbolist Movement in Europe: 1850 - 1920. 4 Hours.

To study a movement in art and literature, spanning the latter part of the 19th and the beginning of the 20th centuries. Different in its national emphasis on artistic and literary issues, the movement was internationally anchored in similar philosophical precepts. This course will foreground the predominant themes informing such diverse works as those by the English Pre-Raphaelites, the French Symbolists and Decadents, German, Scandinavian, Turkish and Russian artists and writers. This course is of a comparative and interdisciplinary nature. Course Information: Same as ART 431 and LIS 447. This course fulfills an Engaged Citizenship Common Experience requirement at UIS in the area of Global Awareness.

ENG 425. European Literature: Ancient Greek and Biblical Motives, 1880-Present. 4 Hours.

Demonstrates how our culture is influenced by the ancient world. Studies works by Oscar Wilde (British), Thomas Mann (German), Michael Bulgakov (Russian) and Marguerite Yourcenar (French).

ENG 426. ECCE: Expatriate Paris. 4 Hours.

This course will introduce you to artists, writers, and poets who created their works away from their homeland and you will see how their works influenced or did not influence the culture of the country in which they lived and created, You will learn to look at works of art and see them as well as to be able to read a literary work and to understand its depth and complexity, as well as improve your analytical and writing abilities and research and writing skills. Course Information: Same as ART 432 and LIS 432. This course fulfills an Engaged Citizenship Common Experience requirement at UIS in the area of Global Awareness.

ENG 430. Topics in American Literature II. 3 Hours.

Advanced study of topics and themes in American literatures and cultures. Course Information: Topics vary. Prerequisites: C in ENG 303.

ENG 434. Literature and Culture of Early America. 3 Hours.

Examines early American literature in historical and cultural context covering poetry by Bradstreet and Bryant, fiction by Irving and Cooper, prose nonfiction by Edwards and Franklin, as well as cultural documents. Course Information: Prerequisites:C in ENG 303.

ENG 435. American Literature 1820-1865. 3 Hours.

American literature from the antebellum period, including authors of the American Renaissance, as well as more marginalized voices of the period. Course Information: Prerequisites: C in ENG 303.

ENG 437. American Literature Between the Wars. 3 Hours.

Fiction of major American writers from 1919 to 1939, such as Anderson, Cather, Fitzgerald, Hemingway, Steinbeck, Faulkner, and Hurston. Course Information: Prerequisites: C in ENG 303.

ENG 438. African-American Literature. 3 Hours.

An examination of African-American literature and heritage from slave and freedmen narratives of colonial America through 19th and 20th century writers like Perry, Williams, Washington, DuBois, Dunbar, Wright, Baldwin, Hughes, Brooks, Madhubuti, Morrison, Sanchez, Walker, Angelo, and selected African and Caribbean writers such as Anta Diop and C.L.R. James will be studied. Course Information: Prerequisites: C in ENG 303.

ENG 440. Major Figures in American Literature Since 1900. 3 Hours.

Major authors such as Frost, Hemingway, and Faulkner. Course Information: May be repeated if topics vary. Students may register in more than one section per term. Prerequisites: C in ENG 303.

ENG 443. Chaucer and His Era. 3 Hours.

Texts may include "The Canterbury Tales" and "Troilus and Criseyde", as well as other works. May also extend to the era of Chaucer, his contemporaries and Ricardian literature. Course involves instruction in reading Middle English. Course Information: Prerequisites: C in ENG 303.

ENG 444. Milton. 3 Hours.

Close reading of Milton's works, using "Paradise Lost" as the centerpiece around which his prose and other poems can be understood. Also addresses literary style and Milton's political career. Course Information: Prerequisites: C in ENG 303.

ENG 445. Midwestern Literature. 3 Hours.

Selected works that illuminate rural, town, and urban experience in the Midwest, including works by Cather, Anderson, Bellow, and Brooks. Course Information: Prerequisites: C in ENG 303.

ENG 447. Arthurian Literature. 3 Hours.

Explores the legends and literature surrounding King Arthur. Texts may include both medieval and modern adaptations. Course Information: Prerequisites: C in ENG 303.

ENG 448. The Shakespeare Project. 3 Hours.

Examination of six plays and related sonnets, with close attention to Shakespeare's language, facets of performance, and his insights into human nature. Play selection varies from semester to semester. Course Information: Prerequisites: C in ENG 303.

ENG 449. The British Romantics. 3 Hours.

Major figures (1789 to 1832), including Blake, Wordsworth, Coleridge, Byron, Shelley, and Keats. Course Information: Prerequisites: C in ENG 303.

ENG 450. Topics in British Literature II. 3 Hours.

Advanced study of topics and themes in British literatures and cultures. Course Information: May be repeated if topics vary. Preerquisites: C in ENG 303.

ENG 453. Poetry and Prose of the Victorian Age. 3 Hours.

Major poets and prose writers of 19th-century England, including Carlyle, Tennyson, the Brownings, Newman, Arnold, Mill, the Rossettis, Swinburne, and Hopkins. Emphasis on the "Wemmick Syndrome," the divided self. Course Information: Prerequisites: C in ENG 303.

ENG 454. The British Novel from Dickens to Hardy. 4 Hours.

Study of the relationship between the novel and society in 19th century Britain through scrutiny of selected works by such major Victorian novelists as Dickens, Eliot, Mrs. Gaskell, the Bronte sisters, and Hardy. Emphasis on the realist novel; further emphasis on class through study of the industrial novel and on gender through study of the connections between 19th century British women writers and the novel form.

ENG 455. Modern British Literature. 3 Hours.

British literature from the end of the 19th century to 1970, including Bennet, Shaw, Lawrence, Joyce, Woolf, Waugh, Golding, Beckett, Bowen, and Greene. Emphasis on the history and development of the early modern British novel. Course Information: Prerequisites: C in ENG 303.

ENG 456. Contemporary British Literature. 3 Hours.

British literature from 1979 to the present, including Amis pere et fils, Iris Murdoch, John Fowles, David Lodge, Angela Carter, Margaret Drabble, Ian McEwan, John Banville, and Pat Barker. Emphasis on the history and development of the late modern-to-contemporary British novel.Course Information: Prerequisites: C in ENG 303.

ENG 460. Themes in Literature. 3 Hours.

How literary works express such themes as the American dream, futurism, industrialism, minority experiences, women's roles, and nature writing. Course Information: May be repeated if topic varies. Students may register in more than one section per term. Prerequisites: C in ENG 303.

ENG 461. Major Women Writers. 3 Hours.

Novels or longer works in other genres (e.g., drama, film, etc.) by female authors or directors. Course Information: Prerequisites: C in ENG 303.

ENG 463. Mythology. 3 Hours.

Authors and stories of the ancient world, primarily Greece and Rome, but topics may vary and extend comparatively to other cultures and regions (e.g. Asian, African, Middle Eastern, Old Norse, Native American)or analyze effects of ancient mythologies on writers working in later periods. (May include authors such as Homer, Hesiod, Aeschylus, Sophocles, Euripides, Virgil and Ovid). Course Information: Prerequisites: C in ENG 303.

ENG 464. Literature and the Bible. 3 Hours.

Biblical literature and the history of the Bible as literature, with special focus on its development in English, and/or its influence on British and American writers. Course Information: Prerequisites: C in ENG 303.

ENG 466. Digital Technologies in English Studies. 3,4 Hours.

Computing in English Studies explores the writing, reading, production, and design of text(s) across emergent digital contexts. This course acts as an introduction to the theories and practices of digital humanities broadly writ, and will give students a low-stakes arena to begin exploring the production of digital materials. This course will provide broad theoretical background information for digital humanities, digital publishing, and document design. Course Information: Prerequisites: C or better in ENG 102 or CAP 115 or equivalent.

ENG 470. Topics in Creative Writing II. 3 Hours.

Instruction in writing original poetry, novels, plays, and short stories. Course Information: May be repeated if topics vary. Students may register in more than one section per term. Prerequisites: C in ENG 303.

ENG 471. Creative Writing: Nonfiction. 3 Hours.

Creative writing grounded in the empirical world: interviews, memoirs, and other primary sources. Focus on locating a structural pattern in previously uncontextualized material and writing that information with a clear and consistent voice. Course Information: Prerequisites: C in ENG 303.

ENG 480. Topics in Genre Study. 3 Hours.

Scrutiny of such genres as science fiction, mystery, the Gothic novel, literary biography, film, drama, lyric poetry, and the long poem. Course Information: May be repeated if topics vary. Students may register in more than one section per term. Prerequisites: C in ENG 303.

ENG 481. Memoirs Across Cultures. 3 Hours.

This is a course about reading, analyzing, writing, and redefining memoirs. The autobiographical writings on the reading list look at the inner life of the authors as well as the outer events. We will examine how historical context, socio-political climate, cultural memories, and identities are represented in these personal narratives, and in the process redefine the genre of memoirs. Course Information: Prerequisites: C in ENG 303.

ENG 489. Capstone. 3 Hours.

This course focuses on culminating projects in the field of English studies, acting as a capstone for the major and moving students towards professional work. Students will research specific professional contexts aligning with their interests, including but not limited to publication venues, and demonstrate advanced critical knowledge of the field. They will also reflect on the significance of their future contributions within the field and within contemporary society more broadly.

ENG 498. Honors Project. 3 Hours.

This course provides structure for students to complete a significate honors thesis or project related to the discipline of English. Course Information: Open to both online and on-campus students who meet the admission criteria for the English Honors Program. It can be counted toward the B.A. as an English elective. Restricted to English Honors. Course Information: Prerequisites: C in ENG 303.

ENG 499. Tutorial. 1-12 Hours.

Intended to supplement, not supplant, regular course offerings. Students interested in a tutorial must secure the consent of the faculty member concerned before registration and submit any required documentation to him or her. Course Information: May be repeated.

ENG 501. Digital Humanities Research. 4 Hours.

This course explains how digital media has transformed English studies. Students will learn how databases and digitized collections are created, gain hands-on experience with the basic digital tools used to develop these projects, evaluate and critique how these digital projects affect the study of the humanities. Course Information: This course fulfills a requirement for the digital publishing concentration of the English MA.

ENG 502. Textual Criticism. 4 Hours.

This is an introduction to major textual and critical theories of analytical reading and literary production and their history. The course will address the editorial, archival, and analytic tools and methods for English Studies that pertain to digital and online modes of publication in an interdisciplinary context. Course Information: This course fulfills a core requirement for the ENG M.A.

ENG 510. Seminar: Major Figures in British Literature 1700-1900. 4 Hours.

One or two major authors, including significant scholarly research. Course Information: May be repeated if topics vary. Students may register in more than one section per term.

ENG 530. Seminar: Topics in Composition and Rhetoric. 4 Hours.

Course will provide an extensive and in-depth examination of historic and cultural movements, or personalities that have influenced the field of composition and rhetoric. Course Information: Topics vary.

ENG 540. Seminar: Topics in Literary Study. 4 Hours.

Course will provide structure for the examination of themes and topics relevant to and integral with literary study. Course Information: May be repeated if topics vary. Students may register in more than one section per term.

ENG 550. Seminar: Topics in Teaching Writing. 4 Hours.

Advanced study of composition theories and application to the classroom. Course Information: Topics vary.

ENG 551. Teaching Literature. 4 Hours.

This course requires students to apply pedagogical and literary theories and methodologies to the literature they read as scholars. Students will create undergraduate literature courses, including syllabi, teaching units, and assignments, as well as a teaching philosophy. Students must observe the methods of a literature class and complete teaching demonstrations. Course Information: Restricted to graduate students.

ENG 552. Sociolinguistics and English Studies. 4 Hours.

This course is intended to prepare teachers of English at the secondary and post-secondary level to teach students with variable sociolinguistic backgrounds. Students will write a policy statement regarding language, develop a teaching unit, lead discussion in class, and complete an analysis of discourse in education or other academic community. Course Information: Restricted to graduate students.

ENG 553. Teaching Practicum. 2 Hours.

Students will shadow a faculty mentor teaching freshman composition. Students attend all classes. Complete an observation journal, teach occasionally, and mark essays for one major assignment. Students meet at least twice (midterm and end of course) with the instructor assigned to the practicum. Course Information: Prerequisite: ENG 550.

ENG 554. Teaching Technologies in English Studies. 4 Hours.

This course prepares future university English teachers to make technology a fundamental component of their pedagogy. It will cover the use of all current technologies in teaching and their application in English Studies. It addresses how to apply these technologies in different kinds of classes across the curriculum, on-ground and online. Course Information: Fulfills a requirement for the digital pedagogy concentration of the English M.A.

ENG 555. Contemporary Theory. 4 Hours.

Intensive study of contemporary movements such as New Criticism, Psychoanalysis, Structuralism. Reader Response Deconstruction, Feminism, New Historicism, and Postcolonialism.

ENG 560. Graduate Seminar: Literary Period. 4 Hours.

Coverage of such periods in British literature as Medieval, Renaissance, Restoration and 18th Century, Romantic, Victorian, Edwardian, Modern, Postmodern, or Contemporary, and such periods in American literature as the American Renaissance and other literary periods in modern and contemporary American literature. Course Information: May be repeated if topics vary. Students may register in more than one section per term.

ENG 570. Topics in Creative Writing III. 4 Hours.

Advanced instruction in writing original poetry, novels, and short stories. Course Information: May be repeated if topics vary. Students may register in more than one section per term.

ENG 571. Business of Writing. 4 Hours.

This course focuses on issues in American publishing, authorship and creative writing pedagogy from 1960 to the present, including such topics as: the history of the small literary magazine, the rise of poetry chapbooks, and creative writing within the academy. Course Information: Fulfills a requirement for the digital publishing concentration of the English M.A.

ENG 575. Writing the Long Essay and the Nonfiction Chapter. 4 Hours.

Workshop in writing expository and critical prose for graduate students seeking nuts-and-bolts instruction in writing long essays or chapters in projected nonfiction books or theses. Main writing assignments: two rhetorical analyses of chapters in best-selling books plus a long essay/chapter of no fewer than 7,000 words.

ENG 580. Seminar: Literary Genres. 4 Hours.

Genres such as creative nonfiction, mystery, comedy, science fiction, the Gothic novel, literary biography, film, drama, lyric poetry, and the long poem, with special emphasis on significant scholarly research. Course Information: May be repeated if topics vary. Students may register in more than one section per term.

ENG 587. Comprehensive Examination. 1 Hour.

Preparation for comprehensive examination. NOTE: Students who do not successfully complete the comprehensive examination while registered for ENG 587 must enroll in ENG 588 for zero credit hours ( one billable hour) in all subsequent fall and spring semesters until they pass the exam. Course Information: Credit/No Credit grading only.

ENG 588. Comprehensive Examination Continuing Enrollment. 0 Hours.

Refer to NOTE in course description for ENG 587. Course Information: May be repeated.

ENG 589. Thesis or Creative Writing Project. 1-4 Hours.

Graduate closure activity involving writing a master's thesis or a creative writing project. NOTE: If the thesis or creative writing project is not completed by the time four hours of ENG 589 are accrued in continuing enrollment, students must register for ENG 590 for zero credit hours (one billable hour) in all subsequent fall and spring semesters until the thesis or creative writing project is complete. Course Information: Credit/No Credit grading only. May be repeated to a maximum of 4 hours.

ENG 590. Thesis or Project Continuing Enrollment. 0 Hours.

Refer to NOTE in course description for ENG 589. Course Information: May be repeated.

ENG 599. Tutorial. 1-12 Hours.

Intended to supplement, not supplant, regular course offerings. Students interested in a tutorial must secure the consent of the faculty member concerned before registration and submit any required documentation to him or her. Course Information: May be repeated.