Communication

Master of Arts
Bachelor of Arts
Undergraduate Minor

www.uis.edu/communication/
Email: com@uis.edu
Office Phone: (217) 206-6790
Office Location: UHB 3010

 

The Master's Degree

The graduate program in Communication has two main objectives:

  1. Guide students in an intensive exploration of the structure and function of communication, and
  2. Educate students in the methods and theory of communication inquiry.

Although 400-level courses are open to both B.A and M.A. candidates, graduate students enrolled in 400-level courses should expect more stringent grading standards and/or more assignments (and perhaps differently structured assignments) than undergraduates enrolled in the same courses.

Advising

It is recommended each new graduate student should consult with a faculty advisor before initial registration. Academic advisors work with students to develop a tentative plan of study based on department requirements and on the students’ personal interests.

Grading Policy

No grade below B- in a Communication course may be applied toward the degree, and students who do not maintain a cumulative 3.0 GPA will be placed on academic probation. Communication courses to be counted toward the degree requirements may not be taken on a CR/NC basis except for COM 501.

NOTE: Students also should refer to the campus policy on Grades Acceptable Toward Master’s Degrees section of this catalog.

Degree Requirements

Required Courses

Students must complete department-required courses (COM 501, COM 504, and COM 506) at UIS to graduate. No waivers or substitutions are accepted. Courses with a 300 course prefix number that advisors require of graduate students as prerequisites must be passed with a minimum grade of B (grades of B- or lower will not be accepted). Hours earned as prerequisites may not be counted toward the graduate degree.

All Communication M.A. candidates are required to complete at least 36 hours of graduate study in communication, including at least three 500-level graduate seminars. Graduate seminars are numbered 514 through 580.

No more than eight semester hours of graduate-level courses may be taken before taking COM 504, which is offered only in the fall semester. A student may not register for COM 501 until (s)he has registered for COM 506. COM 506 is offered only in the spring semester.

Core Requirements

COM 504Introduction to Graduate Study in Communication4
COM 506Research Methods in Communication4
500-level graduate seminars in Communication12
Graduate-level COM courses (400- or 500-level)12
Elective (400- or 500-level) 14
COM 501Closure Experience (minimum)4
Total Hours40
1

If an elective is outside of Communication, it must be approved by student petition with the Communication Department. 

Additional courses may be required by the advisor, with department approval, in order to meet deficiencies. COM 599 credit may not be used to satisfy the 500-level seminar requirement.

Important Course Information

Course Repetition: COM 570 and COM 580 may be taken for credit more than once provided the course topic is different each time. No more than six semester hours of credit for COM 499 and COM 599 (tutorials) will be accepted for the degree. All other Communication courses may be repeated for grade improvement only once.

Course Offerings: Cross-listed courses may be accepted for the major. Students should be careful to register for the course with the appropriate department prefix (COM) to ensure that credit is received. Other courses may be accepted toward the major only through student petition with the Communication Department.

Master’s Closure

In accordance with campus requirements, all graduate students must complete a closure experience (COM 501) consisting of one of the following: a thesis, a project, or comprehensive exams. The proposed thesis or project must be approved by a faculty committee before it is started. Students must have completed a minimum of 32 (preferably 36) credit hours to be eligible for comprehensive exams. Students write comprehensive exams over five areas during a two-day period. Comprehensive exams will be offered once every semester at a regularly scheduled time. More specific guidelines on any of the three options listed above are available from the Communication Department or from COM faculty.

Students must enroll for a total of four hours credit in the closure experience; however, they may accrue the total in increments. Campus policy requires that students be enrolled in at least one semester hour of closure experience for each fall and spring semester after they have begun their graduate closure exercise until that exercise is completed. For Communication students, this means that if the closure experience (thesis/project/comprehensive exams) has not been completed by the end of four continuous credit hours of enrollment in COM 501, students must register for COM 502 (zero credit hours, one billable hour) each regular semester (excluding summer terms) until the closure experience is completed.

Degree Program Program Type Dept Application Materials and Admission Criteria Prerequisite Course Requirements Department ADM Review Dept Conditional Admits Dept Appeal Process
Communication MAOn campus*Minimum overall undergraduate GPA of 3.00

*Two letters of recommendation including one from an academic source

*One – two page personal statement of purpose

*Passing score on COM Dept graduate admission writing examination

*Students whose native language is not English must achieve a score of 580 or above on the paper-based TOEFL, or the equivalent on the computer-based or internet-based TOEFL tests.
N/ADepartment Chair and at least two additional COM faculty Yes, must complete 8 credit hours of prescribed COM courses and receive a grade of B or better for full admission Yes, petition process with review by all COM faculty

Courses

COM 101. Understanding Media. 3 Hours.

This course will study communications media, from the first media of early civilizations to the current explosion and convergence of digital media in the information age. The focus will be on how media have influenced the maintenance of social order and have been agents of change. Course Information: This course fulfills a general education requirement at UIS in the area of Freshman Seminar and Social and Behavioral Science.

COM 112. Oral Communication. 3 Hours.

Course emphasizing development of effective speaking skills through students' in-class presentations as well as through critical analysis of the effectiveness of oral communication. Course Information: This course fulfills a general education requirement at UIS in the area of Oral Communication. (IAI Code C2 900).

COM 141. Sport/Media/Culture & College. 3 Hours.

This course examines the relationship between sports and the media in today's society and analyzes how sports and the media coverage of sports provides social and cultural values and addresses issues of class, race, gender, and sexual orientation. Drawing on theories of communication, rhetoric, cultural criticism, and identity, we will use the lens of sports to provide an introduction to the academic and social skills needed to be successful in college. Course Information: This course fulfills a general education requirement at UIS in the area of Freshman Seminar or in the area of Humanities.

COM 202. Human Sexualities. 3 Hours.

Introductory survey of major concepts, themes, and terminology in human sexuality; sexual anatomy and physiology; reproduction and contraception; sexual (dys)function and communication; STDs, sexual violence, and sexuality in the media. Course Information: Same as WGS 202. Intended for Freshmen and Sophomores. This course fulfills a general education requirement at UIS in the area of Social and Behavioral Sciences.

COM 210. Media Writing. 4 Hours.

Introduction to the many types of media writing including print, radio and TV, web writing, public relations and advertising. Focus is put on developing strong writing skills and using the journalistic style of The Associated Press Stylebook. Course Information: Topical Area: Journalism/Media Studies. Course may be counted as upper-level Communication credit via petition to the department.

COM 215. Photography I. 3 Hours.

In-depth exploration of the photographic process with an emphasis on a fine print creation, camera techniques and use of light for both digital and film. Course Information: Same as ART 215. Topical area: Visual Arts. This course fulfills a general education requirement at UIS in the area of Visual, Creative, and Performing Arts.

COM 236. Introduction to Digital Media. 3 Hours.

Introductory course covering the theory and practice of digital media. Over the course, students will be introduced to digital imaging, animation, and web design all within and while learning the Mac OS environment. The course will also concentrate on media theory and art and design criticism. Course Information: Same as ART 236. Topical Area: Journalism/Media Studies. Course may be counted as upper-level Communication credit via petition. This course fulfills a general education requirement at UIS in the area of Visual, Creative, and Performing Arts.

COM 251. Digital 3D Modeling. 3 Hours.

An introduction to 3D software as a content creation tool-Including modeling, composition, lighting, rendering, compositing, and prototyping. Students will study aspects of Sketchup and Rhinoceros software for modeling and prepare files for print, 3D output, and animation. Course Information: Same as ART 251.

COM 302. Introduction to Interpersonal/Organizational Communication. 4 Hours.

Introduction to fundamental theories and concepts in interpersonal and organizational communication. Specific theories of how humans establish meaning systems and form communication relationships. Course Information: Topical Area: Interpersonal Communication. Open to Communication majors and minors only. Not intended for students with Freshman standing.

COM 303. Introduction to Mass Media. 4 Hours.

Introduction to mass media, including theory, history and tradition, structure and function, controls on the media, technology, ethical and legal issues, and future trends. Course Information: Topical Area: Journalism/Media Studies. Open to Communication majors and minors only. Not intended for students with Freshman standing.

COM 306. Photography II. 4 Hours.

Extension, development, and continuation of studies in photography. Students should be increasingly able to generate their own ideas about the medium and work toward the production of a personal body of work using both chemical and digital processes. Course Information: Same as ART 306. Prerequisite: ART 215 or COM 215. Topical Area: Journalism/Media Studies.

COM 309. Introduction to Social Media. 4 Hours.

This course provides an introduction to the history, theory, and uses of social media. By discussing the nature and features of social media tools, this course examines not only the debate over the impact of social media, but also their relevance in our daily lives and future careers. It explores the ways by which social media influence a variety of segments of mass media ? journalism, broadcasting, public relations, advertising and marketing.

COM 311. Audio Production. 4 Hours.

Hands-on introduction to audio principles, sound reproduction, and techniques for multi-media production. This includes discussion of audio fundamentals and exercises using both analog and digital recording equipment. Digital equipment and techniques are introduced for radio, television, and other multimedia presentations. Course Information: Topical Area: Journalism/Media Studies.

COM 312. Multimedia Reporting. 4 Hours.

Study and practice in techniques involved in interviewing, reporting, and writing. Weekly in-class news story assignments. Course Information: Topical Area: Journalism/Media Studies.

COM 313. Introduction to Radio. 4 Hours.

Study of the language and core concepts of radio and related fields. History, station organization, and business practices are considered. Students explore career opportunities, past and present techniques, format development, and applicable regulations. Several audio projects will be completed. Course Information: Topical Area: Journalism/Media Studies.

COM 314. Radio Practicum. 1 Hour.

Student serves as a radio performer, producer, writer, or as technical support for the UIS student radio station - The Prairie Star. Students will participate in group training sessions, individual training sessions, and both on-air and production activities. Course Information: Prerequisite: Successful completion of COM 313. May be repeated, with approval, for a maximum or 4.0 hours.

COM 323. Voice and Movement. 4 Hours.

Explores the voice and body as instruments of expression in performance and daily communication. The course will focus on vocal and physical exercises for a more accessible performing instrument. Course activities will include various physical and vocal explorations, exercises, improvisations, and non-verbal performance projects. Course Information: Same as THE 323. Topical Area: Interpersonal Communication.

COM 337. Digital Media: Print. 4 Hours.

Intermediate course covering the theory and practice of digital media as it applies to print. Students will be introduced to different printing techniques and outputs, professional and archival printing and the technical properties of the translation of screen-based media to print-based media. Course Information: Same as ART 337. Prerequisite: ART 236 or permission of instructor. Topical Area: Journalism/Media Studies.

COM 338. Digital Media: Web. 4 Hours.

Intermediate course covering theory and practice of digital media as it applies to the web. Students will create web-based projects incorporating images, animations, sound and video. Course also will explore programmatic/systemic relationship between digital media and its uses on the web. Course Information: Same as ART 338. Prerequisite: COM 236 or ART 236 or instructor approval. Topical Area: Journalism/Media Studies.

COM 339. Digital Media: Animation. 4 Hours.

Intermediate course covering the theory and practice of digital media as it applies to animation. Students cover basic terminology, concepts, and principles of animation. Course covers historical perspective, current technologies and applications, basic principles of 2D and 3D animation, and animation on the Web. Course Information: Same as ART 339. Prerequisite: ART 236 or COM 236 or permission of instructor. Topical Area: Journalism/Media Studies.

COM 341. Media and Social Change. 4 Hours.

An exploration of the use of innovative communication technologies in facilitating and enhancing social change across time and space. The economical, political, and societal impact of communication technologies are examined. Also explored is how media technologies shape the lives of citizens across the world. A survey of both scholarly and popular literature is used to examine the debate over the impact of these technologies on globalization.

COM 352. Visual Storytelling and Reporting. 4 Hours.

Students learn how to visually tell a story using video shooting and editing techniques. Students improve interviewing skills while working on broadcast script writing, and learn how to marry the video with a script and present stories visually. Course Information: Same as ART 372 Topical Area: Journalism/Media studies. This course fulfills a general education requirement at UIS in the area of Visual, Creative, and Performing Arts.

COM 362. Introduction to Public Relations. 4 Hours.

Introduction to the theories, functions, and applications of public relations. Analysis of the most effective methods of internal/external public relations in profit and nonprofit organizations. Course Information: Topical Areas: Journalism/Media Studies; Interpersonal Communication.

COM 373. Intermediate Acting. 4 Hours.

A more in-depth continuation of the concepts studied in "Principles of Acting," focusing on an approach to acting that is universally applicable to various genres and styles. Contemporary material, as well as other periods and styles, will be explored. Course Information: Same as THE 373. Prerequisite: THE 273 or COM 273 or equivalent. Topical Area: Interpersonal Communication.

COM 380. Special Topics in Communication. 1-4 Hours.

Study of a current communication topic. Description of topic for a given semester will be stated in the course schedule. Course Information: Topical Areas: Journalism/Media; Interpersonal Communication. May be repeated if topics vary.

COM 403. Feature Writing. 4 Hours.

Analysis and practice of feature writing style for newspaper and magazine. Regular feature article assignments help students build a professional portfolio of work. Publication encouraged but not required. Course Information: Topical Area: Journalism/Media Studies. Not intended for students with Freshman standing.

COM 404. Media Law And Ethics. 4 Hours.

Examination of media law and ethical decisionmaking from the standpoint of media producers, critics, and users. Case studies include obscenity and indecency, libel, privacy, advertising, conflict of interest, and rights of access. Lectures and discussions examine social and cultural contexts in which laws and ethical principles develop. Course Information: Same as PAR 404. Topical Area: Journalism/Media Studies. Not intended for students with Freshman or Sophomore standing.

COM 405. Editing. 4 Hours.

Examination of the editing process as it relates to newspapers, magazines, public relations work, and other publications. Study of journalistic style, grammar review, concise writing, legal and ethical issues of editing, and design fundamentals. Topical Area: Journalism/Media Studies. Not intended for students with Freshman standing.

COM 407. Photojournalism & Photo Documentary: Storytelling in Images. 4 Hours.

Course orients students to the rich traditions, contexts, goals and practices of photojournalism and photo documentary. Students critically examine social and cultural functions of photography and produce photo projects. Students seeking careers as photojournalists, freelance photographers, photo editors and digital media specialists in public relations, advertising, and a variety of fields will find course content beneficial. All skill levels welcome. Basic photography skills preferred. No prerequisite.

COM 411. Computer-Mediated Interpersonal Communication. 4 Hours.

Exploration of the ways in which our personal identity is mediated through electronic communication by providing students with an understanding of the human-computer interface. Intrapersonal, interpersonal, group, and organizational levels of computer-mediated communication are considered. Students will develop effective practices for using electronic communication across a variety of communication contexts. Course Information: Topical Areas: Journalism/Media Studies; Interpersonal Communication. Not intended for students with Freshman or Sophomore standing.

COM 421. Interpersonal Communication. 4 Hours.

Analysis of communication at the individual level including extended examination of informational, perceptual, and prediction processes that lead to successful communication. Includes role and relationships as factors that affect the communication process and techniques for improving communication ability. Interpersonal communication theories compared and evaluated. Course Information: Topical Area: Interpersonal Communication.

COM 422. Small Group Communication. 4 Hours.

Fundamental theories and concepts of small group communications are demonstrated through practical application and small group work. The course will focus on such aspects of small group communication as leadership, decision-making, and conflict management.

COM 423. Dating and Relating. 4 Hours.

An in-depth analysis of the complexities and challenges of initiating, escalating, and terminating romantic relationships and the communicative processes that help and/or hinder relational development. Topics addressed include attraction, understudied relationships, problematic interaction, and changes in the dating process. Course Information: Prerequisite: COM 302.

COM 424. Gender Communication. 4 Hours.

Examination of female and male communication in a variety of contexts including family, romance, education, and the workplace. Representations in the media critiqued and theories of gender differences compared and evaluated. Course Information: Same as WGS 424. Topical Area: Interpersonal Communication. Not intended for students with Freshman or Sophomore standing.

COM 425. ECCE: Intercultural Communication. 4 Hours.

Analysis of domestic and international cultures. Examines differing world views, nonverbal cues, beliefs, language, artifacts, sources of conflict, and methods for negotiating meaning across borders. Course Information: Topical Area: Interpersonal Communication. Not intended for students with Freshman standing. This course fulfills an Engaged Citizenship Common Experience requirement at UIS in the area of U.S. Communities.

COM 428. Nonverbal Communication. 4 Hours.

Examination of how personal symbols (clothes, gesture, etc.) and use of public contexts (space, time) convey meaning; problems arising from differing interpretations of these symbols in a culturally diverse society. Course Information: Topical Area: Interpersonal Communication.

COM 431. Interpersonal Communication: Practicum. 1-4 Hours.

Credit is available under this title only through the credit for prior learning program. Students with substantial work or life experience in areas covered by a course or combination of courses listed with the topical area of Interpersonal Communication may apply for credit by documenting their relevant theoretical and practical learning under the guidance of credit for prior learning faculty. Interested students should consult with a faculty member in communication. Course Information: Credit/No Credit grading only. May be repeated to a maximum of 4 hours. Topical Area: Interpersonal Communication.

COM 437. Digital Media: Typography. 4 Hours.

Advanced course covering the theory and practice of digital media as it applies to topography. Students will be introduced to the terminology, concepts, and history of typography, while completing typesetting projects in the contexts of drawn, digital, printed and web-based formats. Course Information: Same as ART 437. Prerequisites: ART 236 or COM 236 or permission of instructor.

COM 443. Electronic Media Management. 4 Hours.

Introduces electronic media management decision-making in operations, personnel, and content, promotions, finance, engineering, and government regulations. This course stresses communication and leadership via group learning. Explores how policies are formulated and implemented in electronic media operations. Course Information: Topical Area: Journalism/Media Studies.

COM 444. Advanced Media Writing. 4 Hours.

Practice in advanced journalism that is focused on writing features and columns for newspaper and magazine. Involves lecture and workshop. Students work independently on individual writing projects while meeting in a regular roundtable of discussion about their progress.

COM 445. ECCE: Children, Adolesents, and the Media. 4 Hours.

Examination of positive and negative impact of the media including television, movies, the recording industry, video games, and magazines on children and adolescents. Explores media link to violence and aggressive behavior, sexuality, drug use, and body image, and research on gender and racial differences in responding to the media. Course Information: Topical Area: Journalism/Media Studies. Not intended for students with Freshman or Sophomore standing. This course fulfills an Engaged Citizenship Common Experience requirement at UIS in the area of U.S. Communities.

COM 447. Media Criticism. 4 Hours.

Course examines theories and methods for the critical analysis of a variety of media texts, from newspaper to television to film. Media texts will be viewed from the overarching theoretical positions of cultural studies and political economy while examining issues of gender, race and politics. Methodological starting points include discourse and frame analysis; analytical starting points include semiotics, feminism, psychoanalysis and Marxism. Course Information: Topical Area: Journalism/Media Studies.

COM 448. Advertising. 4 Hours.

Theoretical and critical analysis of advertising with some emphasis on its historical context and its role in the transformation of society into a postmodern consumer culture. Students develop advertising campaigns as part of a full examination of advertising as message and function. Course Information: Topical Area: Journalism/Media Studies. Not intended for students with Freshman standing.

COM 451. Journalism/Media Studies: Practicum. 1-4 Hours.

Credit is available under this title only through the credit for prior learning program. Students with substantial work or life experience in areas covered by a course or combination of courses listed with the topical area of Journalism/Media Studies may apply for credit by documenting their relevant theoretical and practical learning under the guidance of credit for prior learning faculty. Interested students should consult with a faculty member in communication. Course Information: Credit/No Credit grading only. May be repeated to a maximum of 4 hours. Topical Area: Journalism/Media Studies.

COM 452. Entrepreneurial Journalism. 4 Hours.

This course introduces students to how changes in the media landscape affect traditional news media, resulting in new business models and job descriptions for journalists. By considering the far-reaching shifts in the media industry, this course guides students to explore alternative business models, entrepreneurial journalism, and the basics of running news organizations.

COM 453. Advanced Visual Field Reporting. 4 Hours.

Builds on broadcast news writing, interviewing, and editing skills learned in COM 352. Adds emphasis on story ideas, camera operations, editing and reporting. Students will learn how to tell stories effectively using voice-over, stand-ups, natural sound, and video. Course Information: Same ART 473. Prerequisite: COM 352 or ART 372. Topical Area: Journalism/Media Studies.

COM 458. Media from a Liberal Arts Perspective. 4 Hours.

Examination of popular media, with a focus on television, from a liberal arts perspective and particularly from the perspective of how television presents, distorts, and comments on each of the Ernest Boyer learning categories. Collectively, television and other mass media supply practically an unlimited range of resources across all Boyer categories. Course Information: Topical Area: Journalism/Media Studies.

COM 459. The Beatles: Popular Music and Society. 4 Hours.

The purpose of this course is to develop an understanding of not only the Beatles and their musical accomplishments, but also the impact they had and are having on popular music and society. Toward that end, we will listen to their music, watch videos of their work and hear their comments on that work, as well as read some of the best writing on the Beatles. Course Information: Same as LIS 431.

COM 462. Writing For Public Relations. 4 Hours.

Intensive study of the most effective methods for written public relations communication. Students write news releases, broadcast announcements, and newsletter copy, as well as work on grammar and journalistic style. Course Information: Prerequisite: COM 210 or COM 362, or instructor permission. Topical Areas: Journalism/Media Studies; Interpersonal Communication.

COM 463. Organizational Communication. 4 Hours.

Analysis of organizational communication approaches, managerial style, motivation, leadership, corporate cultures, conflict, public relations, and diversity. Course Information: Topical Area: Interpersonal Communication.

COM 464. Conflict Management. 4 Hours.

Examination of role and effect of conflict on interpersonal, group, and organizational relationships and social movements. Theoretical and practical applications are explored to foster success in conflict resolution. Course Information: Topical Area: Interpersonal Communication.

COM 465. Interviewing. 4 Hours.

Study of and practice in interviewing and its various purposes in communication settings. Practical and theoretical approaches. Course Information: Topical Areas: Journalism/Media Studies; Interpersonal Communication.

COM 466. Comm Research in Action. 4 Hours.

Garner hands-on research experience which is valuable for those wishing to demonstrate research skills to employers and/or those individuals considering graduate school. Students will identify a research problem, collect and analyze data, and draw conclusions from their research.

COM 468. Persuasion. 4 Hours.

Examination of theories and techniques involving attitudinal and behavioral change with the objective of students becoming better practitioners and more critical receivers/analysts of persuasive messages. Students analyze historical and current examples of propaganda and persuasion. Course Information: Topical Area: Interpersonal Communication.

COM 471. Communication Ethics. 4 Hours.

Introduction to ethics of communication practice including evaluation of ethical dilemmas in interpersonal, small group and organizational contexts. Students analyze and compare ethical frameworks and perspectives and develop personal and communal ethical standards, which they apply to ethical dilemmas. Course Information: Topical Area: Interpersonal Communication.

COM 472. Political Communication in the United States. 4 Hours.

Examination of the theories and practices of political communication in the United States. Topics include campaigning vs. governance, communication ethics, political advertising, political campaigns, political debates, the presidency, the role of the media, the role of unelected advisors, speechwriting, technology, etc. Course Information: Topical Area: Journalism/Media Studies.

COM 476. Directing for the Theatre. 4 Hours.

Examination of fundamentals of directing for the theatre and other directing concepts including script analysis, creation of promptbooks, blocking, working with various theatre artists and adapting to spaces. In-class and out-of-class work, including scheduled rehearsals. Course Information: Same as THE 476.

COM 477. ECCE: Global Media and Culture:China. 4 Hours.

This course examines media and culture in China from the perspective of what's happening today based on the traditions, culture and politics of the country. Theoretical perspectives from Communication are used as the basis to examine a variety of types of media, on topics from entertainment and news. Course Information: Not recommended for students with Freshman standing. This course fulfils an Engaged Citizenship Common Experience requirement in the UIS area of Global Awareness.

COM 478. ECCE:Communicating About Race. 4 Hours.

Examines how race is experienced in the U.S. by analyzing documentaries, current events, and several movies. Explores historical and current barriers to genuine dialogue about black/white race relations with some discussion of American Indians, Latinos/as, and Asian Americans (Interpersonal emphasis area) Course Information: This course fulfills an Engaged Citizenship Common Experience requirement at UIS in the area of U.S. Communities.

COM 480. Advanced Topics in Communication. 1-4 Hours.

Intensive study of a current communication topic. Description of topic for a given semester will be stated in the course schedule. Course Information: May be repeated if topics vary. Topical Area: Journalism/Media Studies; Interpersonal Communication.

COM 495. Exit Assessment. 0 Hours.

An exit assessment required of all bachelor's degree-seeking Communication majors prior to completion of the graduate application. Assessment includes 50 multiple choice questions in interpersonal and media communications. Course Information: For departmental assessment only; students are not graded. Taken in the final semester of expected graduation.

COM 499. Tutorial. 1-4 Hours.

Specialized instruction; students may arrange for special courses on otherwise unavailable topics, subject to availability. Course Information: May be repeated to a maximum of 8 hours if topics vary.

COM 501. Closure Experience. 1-4 Hours.

All graduate students must complete a closure experience. Communication students have three options. 1) Thesis: Research-based exploration of a topic approved by thesis committee. 2) Project: Production of a major project selected with approval of project committee. 3) Comprehensive examination: Comprehensive examinations in five topical areas over a two-day period. Students must have completed a minimum of 32 credit hours to be eligible for the comprehensive exam. Students should consult their advisers for program guidelines during their first semester. Successful completion of any of the three options fulfills the master's closure requirement. NOTE: If the thesis/project/exam is not completed by the time four hours are accrued in continuing enrollment, students must register for COM 502 for zero credit hours (one billable hour) in all subsequent semesters until the thesis/project/exam is completed. Course Information: Credit/No Credit grading only. May be repeated to a maximum of 4 hours.

COM 502. Closure Experience Continuing Enrollment. 0 Hours.

Refer to NOTE in course description for COM 501. Course Information: May be repeated.

COM 504. Introduction to Graduate Study in Communication. 4 Hours.

Examination of the literature with which graduate communication students should be familiar, especially that exploring the nature of theory, the functions of research, and the philosophy of communication. Restricted to Graduate - Springfield.

COM 506. Research Methods in Communication. 4 Hours.

Examination of qualitative and quantitative research methods used in communication. Methods examined include surveys, content analysis, discourse analysis, grounded theory, and ethnography. Focus is put on developing students' familiarity with various methodologies in order to design and complete a mini-research project and write a research proposal for future coursework in Communication. Course Information: Restricted to graduate.

COM 516. Communication Theory. 4 Hours.

Seminar studying the nature and functions of theory lays the foundation for more detailed examination of theories from different contexts of communication and with differing philosophical bases. Course Information: Topical Areas: Interpersonal Communication; Journalism/Media Studies.

COM 521. Family Communication. 4 Hours.

Seminar exploring family roles, rules, impact of family stories and secrets, stages of family development and approaches to family conflict. Examination of the communication challenges of single-parent, nuclear, blended and extended family structures. Course Information: Topical Area: Interpersonal Communication.

COM 524. Interracial Communication. 4 Hours.

Seminar examining origins and types of racism in the US. Exploration of how race and ethnicity affect education, housing, friendships and employment. Examination of ways to improve interracial communication. Course Information: Topical Area: Interpersonal Communication.

COM 528. Meaning And Social Structure. 4 Hours.

Seminar examining diversity and multiculturalism similarities and differences in individual interpretation of words, symbols, events, and interaction. Critical exploration of how individuals' language use affects the social structures they build and use, particularly their views of education and learning. Course Information: Topical Area: Interpersonal Communication.

COM 532. Social and Cultural Effects of Mass Media. 4 Hours.

Seminar featuring an overview of social, scientific, and critical theories regarding the effects of mass media on society. Examination of the ways in which these theories develop from particular social and historical contexts and how they reflect ideas and debates about media, politics, and culture. Course Information: Topical Area: Journalism/Media Studies. Restricted to Graduate - Springfield.

COM 541. New Technologies in Electronic Media. 4 Hours.

Seminar on new and emerging technologies and systems in electronic media: hardware, software, and societal impact. Course Information: Topical Area: Journalism/Media Studies.

COM 543. Media Aesthetics. 4 Hours.

Seminar in the basic aesthetic elements and principles of sight, sound, and motion in film/video and their uses for effective communication. Course Information: Topical Area: Journalism/Media Studies.

COM 545. Interactive/Multimedia Technologies. 4 Hours.

Seminar on current and emerging technologies used to provide training and enhance education. Topics include the theories, design concepts, and applications of such technologies as non-linear video, computer graphics and presentations, and interactive video. Course Information: Prerequisite: COM 455. Topical Area: Journalism/Media Studies.

COM 555. Women and Media. 4 Hours.

Seminar exploring the role of women in the media today. Examination of women as participants in the media business and as subjects of the media and the impact of both on society. Course Information: Same as WGS 555. Topical Area: Journalism/Media Studies.

COM 562. Public Relations in Organizations. 4 Hours.

Seminar on the advanced study of public relations in profit and nonprofit organizations. Examination of the threats and opportunities faced by organizations dealing with internal and external public. Hands-on research/participation in a public relations campaign for a local organization. Course Information: Topical Area: Interpersonal Communication.

COM 563. Organizational Communication Theory. 4 Hours.

Seminar featuring an in-depth look at organizational theory integrated with current communication theory. Discussion includes approaches to consulting and analyzing communication in organizations. Course Information: Topical Area: Interpersonal Communication.

COM 564. Film and Culture: A Global Perspective. 4 Hours.

Seminar examining film as cross-cultural practice in communication. Issues of gender, sexuality, class, race, and power will be explored through the theoretical perspectives of Barthes, Foucault, Althusser, Bourdieu and the like. Course Information: Topical Area: Journalism/Media Studies. Restricted to graduates.

COM 565. Communication, Culture, and Power. 4 Hours.

Seminar centered on the right of power as it applies to communication and culture. Specifically, students will attempt a critical evaluation of power as it pertains to the (co)construction of identity within their everyday lives. Topics will include race, gender, class, sexual orientation, religion, politics, and popular culture. Course Information: Topical Area: Interpersonal Communication. Restricted to Graduate - Springfield.

COM 570. Topics in Interpersonal Communication. 4 Hours.

Seminar with intensive study of an interpersonal communication topic. Description of topic for a given semester will be stated in the course schedule. Course Information: May be repeated if topics vary. Topical Area: Interpersonal Communication. Restricted to Graduate - Springfield.

COM 580. Topics in Journalism/Media Studies. 4 Hours.

Seminar with intensive study of a media topic. Description of a topic for a given semester will be stated in the course schedule. Course Information: May be repeated if topics vary. Topical Area: Journalism/Mass Media. Restricted to Graduate - Springfield.

COM 599. Tutorial. 1-4 Hours.

Specialized instruction; graduate students may arrange for special courses on otherwise unavailable topics, subject to availability. Course Information: May be repeated to a maximum of 6 hours if topics vary.